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Rice noodles

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Rice noodles, or simply rice noodle, are noodles made from rice. The principal ingredients are rice flour and water. Sometimes ingredients such as tapioca or corn starch are added in order to improve the transparency or increase the gelatinous and chewy texture of the noodles.

Rice noodles
Rice vermicelli.jpg
Thin rice noodles in dried form
Type Noodle
Main ingredients Rice flour, water
Variations Mí fěn, Shāhé fěn, Mi xian, Bánh canh, Bánh phở, Shavige, Idiyappam, Sevai, Khanom chin
Cookbook: Rice noodles  Media: Rice noodles
A rice noodle dish in a pan

Rice noodles are most common in the cuisines of East and Southeast Asia, and are available fresh, frozen, or dried, in various shapes, thicknesses and textures. Unfortunately, fresh noodles are highly perishable; their shelf life may be just several days. The shelf life may be extended by drying and removing its moisture content. Studies of drying rice noodles were conducted by the International Food Research Journal.[1]

In Tamil Nadu and parts of Kerala, Sri Lanka, Laos, Singapore, and Malaysia, a type of rice noodle known as idiyappam is usually made fresh at home and tends to be tender with a distinctive texture. A variation of idiappam, known as sevai in Tamil Nadu, is used as the base in savoury preparations; it is also called santhakai or sandhavai in the Coimbatore region of Tamil Nadu. A similar preparation, shyavige, is popular in Karnataka.

Pasta made from brown rice flour is also available (in health food stores in Western nations) as an alternative to wheat flour-based noodles for individuals who are allergic to wheat or gluten.

Contents

VarietiesEdit

Dishes made from rice noodlesEdit

 
Closeup of pad thai, a Thai dish made from rice noodles
 
Boiled rice noodles
Cambodian
Chinese
Burmese
Filipino
Indian
  • Rice noodles in coconut milk
Indonesian
Lao
Malaysian
Thai
Vietnamese

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Ismail, M.H. "Transparency phenomena of flat-rice noodles (kuew teow) at drying at soaking variation" (PDF). www.ifrj.upm.edu.my. Retrieved 26 June 2018.