Quba Khanate

Quba Khanate (Azerbaijani: Quba xanlığı, Persian: قوُبا خانلیغی‎) was one of the most significant semi-independent khanate that existed from 1726 to 1806, under Iranian suzerainty.[4][5] It was established in 1726 by Huseyn Ali Khan. Khanate's initial capital was Khudat until 1735 when it was changed to the city of Quba. It bordered Caspian sea to the east, Derbent Khanate to the north, Shaki Khanate to the west, and Baku and Shirvan Khanates to the south.[6]

Quba Khanate

Quba xanlığı
قوُبا خانلیغی
1726–1806
Map of Quba Khanate in 1806 (according to a 1902 Russian map)
Map of Quba Khanate in 1806 (according to a 1902 Russian map)
StatusKhanate
Under Iranian suzerainty[1]
Capital
Common languagesPersian (official)[2][3] Azerbaijani
Tat
Lezgian
History 
• Established
1726
• Disestablished
1806
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Safavid dynasty
Russian Empire

The khanate achieved its greatest prominence under Fatali Khan.

After Fath Ali Khan's death, the Khanate's influence declined. As a result of Mohammad Khan Qajar's conquests and the devastation it had brought, the Alliance of Northern khanates disintegrated. The Khanate was conquered by Russia in 1806, and was fully incorporated into newly created Shamakha Governorate by 1846.[7]

KhansEdit

  • 1680 – 1721 - Huseyn Ali Khan
  • 1721 - Ahmad Khan
  • 1721 – 1722 - Chulaq Surkhay Khan
  • 1722 – 1758 - Husayn Ali Khan
  • 1758 – 1789 - Fatali Khan
  • 1789 – 1791 - Ahmad Khan
  • 1791 – 1806 - Shaykh Ali Agha
  • 1806 – 1816 - Husayn Khan

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Bournoutian, George A. (2016). The 1820 Russian Survey of the Khanate of Shirvan: A Primary Source on the Demography and Economy of an Iranian Province prior to its Annexation by Russia. Gibb Memorial Trust. p. xvii. ISBN 978-1909724808. Serious historians and geographers agree that after the fall of the Safavids, and especially from the mid-eighteenth century, the territory of the South Caucasus was composed of the khanates of Ganja, Kuba, Shirvan, Baku, Talesh, Sheki, Karabagh, Nakhichivan and Yerevan, all of which were under Iranian suzerainty.
  2. ^ Swietochowski, Tadeusz (2004). Russian Azerbaijan, 1905-1920: The Shaping of a National Identity in a Muslim Community. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 12. ISBN 978-0521522458. (...) and Persian continued to be the official language of the judiciary and the local administration [even after the abolishment of the khanates].
  3. ^ Pavlovich, Petrushevsky Ilya (1949). Essays on the history of feudal relations in Armenia and Azerbaijan in XVI - the beginning of XIX centuries. LSU them. Zhdanov. p. 7. (...) The language of official acts not only in Iran proper and its fully dependant Khanates, but also in those Caucasian khanates that were semi-independent until the time of their accession to the Russian Empire, and even for some time after, was New Persian. It played the role of the literary language of class feudal lords as well.
  4. ^ "...khanates of Sheki, Karabagh, and Kuba became the most powerful" Russian Azerbaijan, 1905–1920 – The Shaping of a National Identity in a Muslim Community, p. 17. Cambridge University Press
  5. ^ Bournoutian, George A. (2016). The 1820 Russian Survey of the Khanate of Shirvan: A Primary Source on the Demography and Economy of an Iranian Province prior to its Annexation by Russia. Gibb Memorial Trust. p. xvii. ISBN 978-1909724808. Serious historians and geographers agree that after the fall of the Safavids, and especially from the mid-eighteenth century, the territory of the South Caucasus was composed of the khanates of Ganja, Kuba, Shirvan, Baku, Talesh, Sheki, Karabagh, Nakhichevan and Yerevan, all of which were under Iranian suzerainty.
  6. ^ "Quba xanlığı" (in Azerbaijani). azerbaijans.com]. Archived from the original on 12 January 2019. Retrieved 12 January 2019.
  7. ^ Literature: Samuel Gottlieb Gmelin. Travels through Northern Persia 1770-1774 translated and annotated by Willem Floor (Washington DC, MAGE, 2007); Bakikhanov, The Heavenly Rose-Garden. A History of Shirvan & Daghestan translated and annotated by Willem Floor & Hasan Javadi(Washington DC: MAGE, 2010); Willem Floor, “Who are the Shamkhal and the Usmi?” ZDMG 160/2 (2010), pp. 341-81

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit