Portal:Michigan highways/Did you know

The following facts or hooks have been chosen to appear as in the "Did you know" section of the Michigan Highways portal.

May and June 2011Edit

July 2011Edit

August 2011Edit

September 2011Edit

  • ... that the Pierce Stocking Scenic Drive (covered bridge pictured) was originally a route called the Sleeping Bear Dunes Park?
  • ...that Henry Ford helped stop construction of M-35 in the Upper Peninsula in order to gain admission to the exclusive Huron Mountain Club?
  • ... that M-97 was simultaneously named both Reid Highway and Groesbeck Highway by different levels of government from 1927 until 1949, the year it was dedicated to Alex Groesbeck?
  • ... that M-69 was truncated in 1960 to one-fifth of its length for 33 years?
  • ... that M-212 is the shortest signed highway in Michigan, connecting to Aloha State Park?

October 2011Edit

November 2011Edit

December 2011Edit

January 2012Edit

  • ... that in Midland, M-20 passes The Tridge (pictured), a three-legged bridge?
  • ... that Industrial Drive in Adrian is officially a connector route for M-34?
  • ... that county road H-63 runs along Mackinac Trail, a former Indian path in the Upper Peninsula?
  • ... that a section of M-42 in Wexford County that was transferred to local control was classified as "flexible pavements"?
  • ... that M-154 is one of three state highways on an island?

February 2012Edit

March 2012Edit

April 2012Edit

May 2012Edit

June 2012Edit

July 2012Edit

August 2012Edit

September 2012Edit

  • ...that M-209, serving as a connection to the former Coast Guard station in Glen Haven (general store pictured), was the shortest state highway in the state at a half-mile (0.8 km) until 1996?
  • ... that the first M-65 was replaced by US 23, and the current M-65 replaced two different sections of US 23?
  • ... that a section of M-15 has been nicknamed "Death Alley" over the number of accidents there?
  • ... that M-168 in Elberta previously connected to a car ferry dock?
  • ... that only two of the 280 miles (3.2 of the 450 km) of US 8 lie in Michigan?

October 2012Edit

  • ... that when the Mackinac Bridge (pictured) opened, US 27 was extended north across it?
  • ... that M-201 runs through Northport to connect to Leelanau State Park, but ends well before meeting the park gate?
  • ... that until it was renumbered in the 1930s, M-99 used to be M-9?
  • ... that M-155 is no longer signed, but it is a still a state highway?
  • ... that during the "Southbelt Shuffle" event on M-6 south of Grand Rapids, horses were ridden on the partially completed freeway?

November 2012Edit

December 2012Edit

  • ... that the state highway department moved a bridge from Pennsylvania in the 1920s so that M-35 could cross the Dead River?
  • ... that the eastern and western ends of M-21 were replaced by different Interstate Highways?
  • ... that M-114 was set up as a beltline around Grand Rapids following what are now Wilson Avenue, 28th Street and East Beltline Avenue?
  • ... that US 102 was the first US Highway designation to be decommissioned?
  • ... that M-99 used to be numbered M-9?

January 2013Edit

February 2013Edit

  • ... that Woodward Avenue (pictured in 1942) was planned to be the most important of the five major avenues planned by Judge Augustus Woodward that extend from downtown Detroit in differing directions?
  • ... that in 1966, the freeway conversion of US 131 forced the former Grand Rapids Speedrome, a race track, to close?
  • ... that US 41 is officially the Copper Country Trail National Scenic Byway north of Houghton?
  • ... that M-6 is officially named for Paul B. Henry, a Congressman from the Grand Rapids area who died in office?
  • ... that I-375 was the shortest signed Interstate Highway in the country at 1.06 miles (1.71 km) until I-110 in Texas was signed?

March 2013Edit

April 2013Edit

May and June 2013Edit

  • ... that on May 13, 1913, the legislation creating the State Trunkline Highway System went into effect?
  • ... that the first rural highway centerline in the US was painted on M-15 (currently CR 492) between Negaunee and Marquette in 1917?
  • ... that some of the original highway numbers assigned by the time the system was signposted in 1919 like M-12 or M-41 were decommissioned in 1926 and never used since?
  • ... that M-131 was assigned as an extension of US 131 in 1926 before it was progressively replaced by US 131 and later M-119?
  • ... that Michigan is home to the first roadside table in the country, which was installed next to US 16?
  • ... that Michigan is also home to the first welcome center in the nation, which opened in 1935 near New Buffalo?
  • ... that I-94 was the first Interstate Highway completed border-to-border in any state in the country when it was completed between New Buffalo and Detroit in 1960?

July 2013Edit

  • ... that M-134 is one of three state highways in Michigan on an island, and one of two to use a ferry (pictured)?
  • ... that US 127 was tripled in length by extending the highway to replace its parent route, US 27, in 2002?
  • ... that M-67, a state highway in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, has remained essentially unchanged but the highways connecting to it have changed three times since 1919?
  • ... that M-97 was simultaneously named both Reid Highway and Groesbeck Highway by different levels of government from 1927 until 1949, the year it was dedicated to Alex Groesbeck?
  • ... that the local nickname for I-194 is "the Penetrator"?

August 2013Edit

September 2013Edit

October 2013Edit

November 2013Edit

December 2013Edit

January and February 2014Edit

  • ... that the Pierce Stocking Scenic Drive (covered bridge pictured) was originally a route called the Sleeping Bear Dunes Park?
  • ... that M-67, a state highway in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, has remained essentially unchanged but the highways connecting to it have changed three times since 1919?
  • ... that Westnedge Avenue and Park Street south of downtown Kalamazoo are part of M-331, an unsigned highway?
  • ... that M-38 was previously a part of M-35 that was 65 miles (105 km) away from the rest of the highway?
  • ... that M-78 used to extend south to the Indiana state line and northeast to Flint, but now only runs for about 11 miles (18 km) near Battle Creek?

March 2014Edit

April 2014Edit

May 2014Edit

June 2014Edit

July 2014Edit

  • ... that when the Mackinac Bridge (pictured) opened, US 27 was extended north across it?
  • ... that M-114 was set up as a beltline around Grand Rapids following what are now Wilson Avenue, 28th Street and East Beltline Avenue?
  • ... that US 2 and US 141 each have separate segments in Michigan because the highways cross back into Wisconsin for about 15 miles (24 km)?
  • ... that M-168 in Elberta previously connected to a car ferry dock?
  • ... that US 41 is officially the Copper Country Trail National Scenic Byway north of Houghton?

August 2014Edit

September 2014Edit

October 2014Edit

November and December 2014Edit

January 2015Edit

February 2015Edit

March 2015Edit

April 2015Edit

May 2015Edit

  • ... that US 41 (pictured) was the state's first Michigan Heritage Route in 1995?
  • ... that county road F-41 was previously M-171?
  • ... that the former M-122 connected US 2 in St. Ignace to the state car ferry docks?
  • ... that the route of M-47 was previously part of US 10?
  • ... that the M-64 highway designation was moved twice in two years by exchanging the number with different roads?

June 2015Edit

July 2015Edit

August and September 2015Edit

October 2015Edit

November 2015Edit

December 2015Edit

  • ... that Woodward Avenue (pictured in 1942) was planned to be the most important of the five major avenues planned by Judge Augustus Woodward that extend from downtown Detroit in differing directions?
  • ... that M-38 was previously a part of M-35 that was 65 miles (105 km) away from the rest of the highway?
  • ... that the centerline was invented in Wayne County in 1911?
  • ... that M-95 has been named for Leif Ericson, the Norse explorer?
  • ...that prior to the opening of M-231, a "M23.1k Run" was held with participation limited to 231 runners?

January 2016Edit

  • ... that Broneah Kiteboarding of Traverse City uses the M-22 marker (pictured) as their corporate logo?
  • ... that US 2 and US 141 each have separate segments in Michigan because the highways cross back into Wisconsin for about 15 miles (24 km)?
  • ... that in 1966, the freeway conversion of US 131 forced the former Grand Rapids Speedrome, a race track, to close?
  • ... that the longest state highway outside of the Interstate or US Highway systems in Michigan is M-28?
  • ... that M-6 is officially named for Paul B. Henry, a Congressman from the Grand Rapids area who died in office?

February 2016Edit

March 2016Edit

April 2016Edit

May 2016Edit

June 2016Edit

July 2016Edit

  • ... that the local nickname for I-194 (pictured) is "the Penetrator"?
  • ... that the loop of M-123 north of M-28 has been the Tahquamenon Scenic Heritage Route since 2007?
  • ... that M-212 is the shortest signed highway in Michigan, connecting to Aloha State Park?
  • ... that M-94 in Manistique crosses the Siphon Bridge, a structure once described in the pages of the Ripley's Believe It or Not! column?
  • ... that until it was renumbered in the 1930s, M-99 used to be M-9?

August 2016Edit

September 2016Edit

October 2016Edit

November 2016Edit

  • ... that M-57 passes Rosie's Diner (pictured) near Rockford, a restaurant that served as the filming location in Little Ferry, New Jersey for a series of Bounty paper towel commercials starring Rosie the Waitress?
  • ... that M-69 was truncated in 1960 to one-fifth of its length for 33 years?
  • ... that county road F-41 was previously M-171?
  • ... that only two of the 280 miles (3.2 of the 450 km) of US 8 lie in Michigan?
  • ... that Telegraph Road is named for the telegraph lines that used to run along it?

December 2016Edit

January 2017Edit

February 2017Edit

March and April 2017Edit

May and June 2017Edit

  • ... that M-10 (Lodge Freeway, pictured) in the Detroit area is named for John C. Lodge, a former Detroit mayor?
  • ... that the Seney Stretch (pictured) along M-28 is 25 miles (40 km) of "straight as an arrow highway" commonly called the most boring highway in the state?
  • ... that US 127 and US 223 were going to be upgraded to become part of I-73?
  • ... that the last eight miles (13 km) of US 45 in the country to be paved were in the Military Hills area of eastern Ontonagon County, connecting the Gulf of Mexico and Lake Superior with a hard-surfaced road in 1959?
  • ... that the first M-65 was replaced by US 23, and the current M-65 replaced two different sections of US 23?

July 2017Edit

August 2017Edit

September 2017Edit

October and November 2017Edit

also

December 2017Edit

January 2018Edit

  • ... that M-39 (River Rouge crossing pictured) is better known as the Southfield Freeway?
  • ... that there has never been a highway numbered M-2, but all other numbers less than M-126 have been used?
  • ... that until it was renumbered in the 1930s, M-99 used to be M-9?
  • ... that both M-30 and M-129, on the Lower and Upper peninsulas respectively, follow the Michigan Meridian, an important landmark for how Michigan was surveyed?
  • ...that I-75 carries sections of each of the four Great Lakes Circle Tours in the state?

February 2018Edit

March 2018Edit

April and May 2018Edit

June and July 2018Edit

August 2018Edit