Pennsylvania Senate, District 2

Pennsylvania State Senate District 2 includes parts of Philadelphia County. It includes the following areas:[1]

  • Ward 07
  • Ward 19
  • Ward 23
  • Ward 31 [PART, Divisions 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19]
  • Ward 33
  • Ward 35
  • Ward 53
  • Ward 54 [PART, Divisions 01 and 02]
  • Ward 55
  • Ward 62
  • Ward 63
  • Ward 64 [PART, Divisions 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17 and 18]

SenatorsEdit

Representative[2] Party Years District home Note
Lindsay Coats Federalist 1795 – 1797
Maskell Ewing Federalist 1813 – 1819
Joel Barlow Sutherland Democratic 1815 – 1816 U.S. Representative for Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district from 1827 to 1833[3]
Abraham Bailey Federalist 1815 – 1817
Samuel Cochran Federalist 1817 – 1819
Daniel Groves Democratic-Republican 1821 – 1825
James Kelton Jr. Federalist 1821 – 1825
Stephen Duncan Federalist 1821 – 1829
Peter Hay Old School Jefferson 1827 – 1829
Samuel Breck National Republican 1831 – 1833 U.S. Representative for Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district from 1823 to 1825[4]
Joseph Taylor Democratic 1831 – 1833
George N. Baker Democratic 1833 – 1835
Francis Jacob Harper Democratic 1833 – 1835 U.S. Representative-elect for Pennsylvania's 3rd congressional district in 1836 but died before taking office[5]
James McConkey Whig 1837 – 1837
James Hanna Whig 1837 – 1838
Alexander M. Peltz Democratic 1837 – 1838
Charles Brown Democratic 1837 – 1839 U.S. Representative for Pennsylvania's 1st district from 1841 to 1843. U.S. Representative for Pennsylvania's 3rd district from 1847-1849[6]
Michael Snyder Democratic 1837 – 1839
Samuel Stevenson Democratic 1837 – 1839
John Benton Sterigere Buchanan Democratic 1839 – 1845 U.S. Representative for Pennsylvania's 5th congressional district from 1827 to 1831[7]
Thomas McCully Democratic 1841 – 1842
Benjamin Crispin Democratic 1841 – 1843
James Enue Jr. Democratic 1843 – 1844
Edward A. Penniman Democratic 1843 – 1844
John Foulkrod Democratic 1843 – 1845
Oliver Perry Cornman Democratic 1845 – 1846
Henry Lewis Benner Democratic 1845 – 1847
William Franklin Small Democratic 1847 – 1848
Thomas H. Forsythe Democratic 1847 – 1851
Thomas Sargent Fernon Democratic 1849 – 1851
Peleg Bahrows Savery Democratic 1849 – 1851
Levi Foulkrod Whig 1853 – 1854
Samuel G. Hamilton Native American 1853 – 1854
William Goodwin Democratic 1853 – 1855
Henry Charles Pratt II Republican 1855 – 1856
Thomas S. Bell Democratic 1857 – 1859
Jacob S. Serrill Republican 1861 – 1862
Jacob Elwood Ridgway Republican 1865 – 1867
Alexander Wilson Henszey Republican 1869 – 1871
David A. Nagle Democratic 1875 – 1877
John Cochran Democratic 1879 – 1881
Joseph P. Kennedy Democratic 1881 – 1885
William McAleer Democratic 1887 – 1889 U.S. Representative for Pennsylvania's 3rd congressional district from 1891 to 1895 and from 1897 to 1901[8]
Elwood Becker Republican 1891 – 1897
Israel Wilson Durham Republican 1897 – 1899 Pennsylvania State Senator for the 6th district from 1897 to 1898.[9] President of the Philadelphia Phillies in 1909[10]
George W. Holzwarth Republican 1899 – 1900
Harry Gransback Republican 1901 – 1905
John Morin Scott Republican 1907 – 1909 Pennsylvania State Senator for the 6th district from 1899 to 1906[11]
Samuel W. Salus Republican 1911 – 1937
A. Evans Kephart Republican 1939 – 1953
Benjamin R. Donolow Democratic 1955 – 1972 Senate minority leader from 1965 to 1970[12]
Francis J. Lynch Democratic 1973 – 1993 Pennsylvania Representative for the 195th district from 1967 to 1973[13]
William G. Stinson Democratic 1993 – 1994 Removed from office by order of the U.S. District Court on February 18, 1994[14] due to election fraud[15]
Bruce Marks Republican 1994 Seated April 28, 1994[16]
Christine M. Tartaglione Democratic 1995 – present

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Composite Listing of State Senate Districts" (PDF). Pennsylvania Department of State. Retrieved 2015-02-19.
  2. ^ "Senate Historical Biographies". www.legis.state.pa.us. Retrieved 21 January 2019.
  3. ^ "SUTHERLAND, Joel Barlow (1792-1861)". www.bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  4. ^ "BRECK, Samuel, (1771-1862)". www.bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  5. ^ "HARPER, Francis Jacob, (1800-1837)". www.bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  6. ^ "BROWN, Charles, (1797-1883)". www.bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  7. ^ "STERIGERE, John Benton, (1793-1852)". www.bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  8. ^ "McALEER, William, (1838-1912)". www.bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  9. ^ "Israel Wilson Durham". www.legis.state.pa.us. Retrieved 2 October 2019.
  10. ^ Sporting Life Magazine, Vol. 52, No. 26, March 6, 1909, Philadelphia.
  11. ^ "Pennsylvania State Senate - John Morin Scott Biography". www.legis.state.pa.us. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  12. ^ "Benjamin Donolow". www.legis.state.pa.us. Retrieved 2 October 2019.
  13. ^ "FRANCIS J. LYNCH". www.legis.state.pa.us. Retrieved 2 October 2019.
  14. ^ Cox, Harold (2004). "Pennsylvania Senate - 1993-1994" (PDF). Wilkes University Election Statistics Project. Wilkes University.
  15. ^ "William G. Stinson". www.legis.state.pa.us. Retrieved 2 October 2019.
  16. ^ Cox, Harold (2004). "Pennsylvania Senate - 1993-1994" (PDF). Wilkes University Election Statistics Project. Wilkes University.