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Dublin Pearse railway station

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Pearse railway station (Irish: Stáisiún na bPiarsach) or Dublin Pearse is a railway station on Westland Row on the Southside of Dublin, Ireland. It is Ireland's busiest commuter station and second busiest station overall (behind Dublin Connolly railway station) with 9 million passenger journeys through the station in 2016.[1]

Dublin Pearse

Baile Átha Cliath Stáisiún na bPiarsach
Iarnród Éireann
Pearse Station, Westland Row, Dublin - geograph.org.uk - 376253.jpg
LocationWestland Row, Dublin 2, D02 RV00
Republic of Ireland
Coordinates53°20′36″N 6°14′54″W / 53.3433°N 6.2483°W / 53.3433; -6.2483Coordinates: 53°20′36″N 6°14′54″W / 53.3433°N 6.2483°W / 53.3433; -6.2483
Owned byIarnród Éireann
Operated byIarnród Éireann
Platforms2
Construction
Structure typeElevated
Other information
Station codePERSE
Fare zoneSuburban 1
History
Original companyDublin and Kingstown Railway
Pre-groupingDublin and South Eastern Railway
Post-groupingGreat Southern Railways
Key dates
17 December 1834Opened, as Westland Row
1857Re-gauged to 5' 3"
1880sNew roof and enlargment
1891Dublin loop line opened
1937Services to West of Ireland
1966Renamed Pearse
1983Upgraded
2007Renovation commences
2013Renovation completed
2019New roof built
Services
Preceding station   Iarnrod Eireann simple logo 2013.png Iarnród Éireann   Following station
Tara Street   InterCity
Dublin-Rosslare
  Dún Laoghaire
Mallin
Tara Street   Commuter
Northern Commuter (Peak times only)
  Terminus or Grand Canal Dock
  Commuter
Western Commuter
(City Branch)
(Peak times only)
 
  Commuter
South Western Commuter
(City Branch)
(Peak times only)
 
Tara Street   Commuter
South Eastern Commuter
  Lansdowne Road
Tara Street   DART
Trans-Dublin
  Grand Canal Dock
Disused railways
Terminus   Dublin and Kingstown Railway   Sandymount
Pearse Station sign - (Irish: Stáisiún na bPiarsach)

Contents

ServicesEdit

All DART services serve the station, as do all South Eastern Commuter (Dublin Connolly to Gorey), South Western Commuter (Grand Canal Dock to Newbridge) and InterCity services from Dublin Connolly to Rosslare Europort.

Pearse station is also the terminus of the Northern Commuter to Balbriggan / Dundalk and Western Commuter to Maynooth / Longford services

FacilitiesEdit

The station has two through platforms, 1 and 2, the former on the Boyne Street side for northbound "up" services towards Connolly station, the other on the Pearse Street side for southbound "down" services towards Bray.[2]

The ticket office is open from 07:30 AM to 21:50 PM, Monday to Sunday.

The station also has a café and public toilets.

The southbound entrance (Pearse Street and Trinity Bio Science) is open 07:00 AM to 19:30 PM daily from Monday to Friday, and on Saturdays from 09:00 AM to 18:00 PM, in addition to the main entrance on Westland Row, which is open all during station opening hours.

The station is the headquarters of Iarnród Éireann's DART/Commuter sector.

HistoryEdit

The station opened for service traffic on 17 December 1834 as Westland Row Station,[3] the city terminus of the Dublin & Kingstown Railway (D&KR) , the first 'commuter' line in the world sserving stations to Kingstown.[citation needed] The covering for the passenger station was a simple roof and it was designed to facilitate the arrival and departure of trains every 15 minutes.[4]

In 1857 the gauge was changed from 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) to 5 ft 3 in (1,600 mm) to match the Irish standard.[citation needed] By then the forerunner of the Dublin Wicklow and Wexford Railway (DW&WR) had taken over operations from the D&KR and trains were able to run over the course of the old Dalkey Atmospheric Railway through to connecting at Shanganagh junction with the line from Harcourt Street to Bray.[5]

Patronage grew to 4.5 million passengers per annum in the late 1870s with powers and land obtained for the enlargement of the station.[6] A map of the station in 1878 shows a "departure local & arrival mail" platform of not more than 400 feet (120 m) on the Great Brunswick Street (Pearse Street) side where platform 2 is now, and a similar platform opposite for "departure mail & arrival local" purposes. A turntable existed at the end of the line which could enable a engine to draw away from its train, turn, and proceed up the other line if the station was empty.[7]

There ensured various alterations in 1880's including replacement of the roof and thereafter had four platforms and five tracks,[8] later becoming five platforms.[6] The main span covered the two long platforms where the tracks were later to be extended northbound and two southbound bay platforms one to each side of them. There was also a roof span to the south west which covers a smaller southbound bay platform.

1891 rebuild as a through stationEdit

The station was extensively rebuilt for the opening of the City of Dublin Junction Railway in 1891. During this process, the station was converted into a layout through station with three terminus platforms that was to remained unchanged unchanged until the early 2000s with the northeast bay filled in towards the end of that period.[6] The existing tracks at the Northern end of the station had to be raised by 18 inches (460 mm) to give the required clearance over Westland Row Road and the platforms had to be sloped upwards towards the platform edit to compensate.[5] Some Dublin Wicklow and Wexford Railway (DW&WR) suburban trains started working through to Amiens Street and boat trains and mail could subsequently be worked round to Broadstone and Kingsbridge.

A 1924 diagram shows the platforms numbered as follows:[6][a]

  1.  : A short bay southbound platform in the smaller canopy on the Merrion Square side
  2.  : A longer bay southbound platform in under the main canopy
  3.  : The 'down' though platform which is now platform 1 generally used for southbound trains
  4.  : The 'up' though platform which is now platform 2 generally used for northbound trains
  5.  : A bay southbound laform under the main canopy of a size similar to Platform 2

Former servicesEdit

Prior to 1936 the station handled commuter services and boat trains. In January 1937 the station took over services to Sligo, Westport and Galway over the Midland and Great Western Route via Mullingar, which were transferred to Pearse (then Westland Row) in 1934 with the closure of Broadstone Station on the north side of the Liffey. Great Southern Railways (GSR) facilitated this by installing colour light signalling in 1937 allowing reversible working for the main platforms. These express trains used platform 4 as the departure and arrivals platform which was convenient for the boat trains which generally ran into platform 5. On occasion the train for Galway train would be driven engine-first into platform 5 and the passengers loaded; it would then reverse out and pass through the station on platform 3.[9] Services running south of Bray on the ex-Dublin and South Eastern Railway route to Wicklow, Arklow, Wexford and Rosslare also operated out of Westland Row, though the principal terminus for that route was, for many years Harcourt Street station until 1959.

The upgrading of the Portarlington to Athlone branch in the mid-1970s saw Westport and Galway trains transferred to Heuston station, whilst Sligo and Rosslare trains were retimed to originate and terminate at Connolly station.[citation needed] A very small number of passenger services to Heuston or its main line continued to pass through Pearse station until the about the time of the closure of the Dún Laoghaire pier branch around 1989.[10]

Station renamingEdit

The station was renamed in 1966 after the Pearse Family, notably brothers Patrick and Willie as part of the Easter Rising 50th anniversary celebrations, when several Irish railway stations were renamed. Due to its proximity to Pearse Street, many Dubliners refer to the station incorrectly as Pearse Street Station.

Bay platform removalEdit

The bay platforms have been used as a set for movies including Michael Collins, Angela's Ashes, Nora and the 2005 remake Lassie. Until 2007 the former platform 2 was occasionally used for special services. The former platform 1 continued to exist but was unsuitable for modern passenger trains and was used as a siding before conversion to a car park. Platform 5 had also been unused for some time. By 2008 all the bay platforms had been removed or filled in.

Station renovationEdit

Major renovation commenced in 2007 with publicity erected in the station for this in March 2008. As part of phase 1, automatic ticket validation machines were installed on platforms 1 and 2. The front entrance of the station was changed. The former Spar shop was completely taken out of the station and the old ticket barriers were removed. Platforms 3, 4 and 5 were removed. New signage and CCTV cameras were added on both active platforms and, on Platform 2, a larger waiting area for passengers was provided.

Southbound entrance (Pearse Street and Trinity Bio Science) was opened 9 April 2013.[11]

City Centre Resignalling ProjectEdit

The completion of the Irish Rail City Centre re-signalling project[12] has seen an increase in the number of Northern and Maynooth line suburban trains stopping. Trains from Newbridge now also serve Pearse station.

This has been made possible by increasing the ability of the signalling system in the city centre to operate 20 trains per hour in both directions instead of 8.

The project began in March 2015 and was commissioned on 17 July 2016.[13]

Roof renovationsEdit

The roof structure comprises two main sections - the main station area roof has 40 barrelled roof trusses, each spanning 28 metres, over 38 bays, with additional gable end structures at both ends. Adjacent to the main station roof there is a second similar roof, which covers a car park and station infrastructure area. This is smaller, and comprises 19 trusses over 18 bays.[2]

A €10m roof replacement project started in August 2018 and projected to finish in June 2020.[14]

Pearse Station was projected to be closed for 13 weekends over the two years to facilitate the replacement project.[15] During these weekends, northside DART, Maynooth and Drogheda services would operate to and from Connolly Station, with southside DART and Rosslare services operating from Grand Canal Dock.[14]

Proposed underground stationEdit

The National Transport Authority planned an DART Underground connecting Heuston Station to the northern DART network via the new Docklands railway station in Spencer Dock. As part of this project, an underground station with two additional platforms would have been constructed beneath the present Pearse station as a stop on the DART Underground route. This would have made Pearse station the key exchange point between the new (underground) and old (overground) DART lines. As of 2018, the DART Underground project was not funded or scheduled.[16]

Road transportEdit

The station is served by a number of Dublin Bus routes, stops for which are located just outside the station on Westland Row and around the corner on Pearse Street.

GalleryEdit

See alsoEdit

Notes and referencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ The platform numbering here is evidenced by Shepherds book "The Dublin & South Eastern Railway" in a diagram dated 1924 and by photographs in the early 1960s by O'Dea in the National Library of Ireland and others taken in 1993. Images from film scene sets show different numbering. O.S. Nosk in his book Irish Steam in a passage referring to 1937 labels the platforms 1 to 5 in the opposite direction with the small bay as 5. It it possible the bay platforms may have been renumbered when the through platforms were renumbered 1 and 2

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "National Heavy Rail Census Report 2016" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 14 November 2017. Retrieved 20 April 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Pearse Station Roof Replacement". IrishRail. 11 March 2019. Archived from the original on 28 May 2019.
  3. ^ "Dublin Westland Row station" (PDF). Railscot - Irish Railways. Archived (PDF) from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved 31 August 2007.
  4. ^ "Locomotive Engines on the Dublin and Kingstown Railway". The Dublin Penny Journal. 3: 65–68. 30 August 1834. JSTOR 30004368.
  5. ^ a b Ahrons, E. L. (1954). L. L. Asher (ed.). Locomotive and train working in the latter part of the nineteenth century". six. W Heffer & Sons Ltd. p. 38–39,43.
  6. ^ a b c d Shepherd, Ernie (1988). The Dublin & South Eastern Railway (1988 ed.). Midland Publishing Ltd. p. 135–137. ISBN 1 85780 082 6.
  7. ^ Hutchinson, C. S. Major General (1878). "Dublin and Kingstown railway : high rate of charges". GB Board of Trade Railway Department. Plates 2–3. Retrieved 17 July 2019.
  8. ^ Kullman, Kurt (28 May 2018). The First Irish Railway: Westland Row to Kingtown. THP Ireland. ISBN 978-0750987646.
  9. ^ Nock, O.S. (1983). Irish Steam. David & Charles. pp. 153–155. ISBN 0715379615.
  10. ^ Richard Maund et al. (February 2017). "Passenger services through the Phoenix Park Tunnel" (PDF). Irish Railway Record Society. 27 (192): 227–230. Archived from the original on 16 July 2019. Retrieved 16 July 2019.CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)
  11. ^ "New entrance to Dublin Pearse Station opens - access to Pearse St & Trinity Bio-Science".
  12. ^ "City Centre Resignalling Project". Archived from the original on 17 December 2014. Retrieved 17 December 2014.
  13. ^ "Linking Heuston with city centre 'a priority' - Independent.ie".
  14. ^ a b "One of the country's busiest train stations to shut for 13 weekends 'for new roof' - Independent.ie".
  15. ^ "Explainer: Pearse Station roof replacement- Irish Rail on youtube.com".
  16. ^ "Office plan scrapped to facilitate shelved Dart Underground". irishtimes.com. Irish Times. 5 June 2018. Retrieved 8 August 2018. the [DART Underground] project having been shelved by the Government [in 2011, does] not have government funding [and] was not included in the 10-year National Development Plan published earlier [in 2018]

External linksEdit