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Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan discography

Most of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan's early music was recorded with Rehmat Gramophone House later turned RGH Label. Throughout the ’70s and early ’80s Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan released hundreds of cassettes, most of them containing one or two lengthy songs. Chris Nickson, of Global Rhythm, argues that trying to make order of Khan's entire discography would be a nightmare.[1]

Nusrat Fateh recorded hundreds of albums around the globe. OSA, Birmingham released about 125 audio albums[2] and 30-35 concert films. His international labels included Real World Records, Virgin Music, Ocora, World Music Network, Shanachie, Nascente, American Records,[3] EMI Arabia & France.. He recorded 40-50 cassettes in Pakistan, many of which are available under the EMI Label. More than a decade after his death music companies around the world are releasing new albums every year.

Contents

AlbumsEdit

OSA ReleasesEdit

Major international releasesEdit

  • 1988. In Concert in Paris, VolNitin Sawhney, Musician,Thursday 17 June 2004, Observer.co.uk 1. Ocora.
  • 1988. Shahen-Shah. RealWorld/CEMA.
  • 1990. Mustt Mustt. RealWorld/CEMA. Collaboration with Michael Brook.[5]
  • 1991. Magic Touch OSA.
  • 1991. Shahbaaz. RealWorld/CEMA.
  • 1991. The Day, The Night, The Dawn, The Dusk. Shanachie Records.
  • 1992. Devotional Songs. Real World Records.
  • 1992. Love Songs. EMI.
  • 1993. Ilham. Audiorec.
  • 1993. Traditional Sufi Qawwalis: Live in London, Vol. 2. Navras Records.
  • 1994. Pakistan: Vocal Art of the Sufis, Vol 2 – Qawwali. JVC.
  • 1994. Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan & Party. Real World Records.
  • 1994. The Last Prophet. Real World Records.
  • 1994. Traditional Sufi Qawwalis: Live in London, Vol. 4. Navras Records.
  • 1995. Revelation. Interra/Intersound.
  • 1995. Back to Qawwali. Long Distance
  • 1996. In Concert in Paris, Vol. 3–5. Ocora.
  • 1996. Qawwali: The Art of the Sufis. JVC
  • 1996. Night Song. Real World Records.[6]
  • 1996. Dead Man Walking: The Score. Columbia/Sony[7]
  • 1996. Intoxicated Spirit. Shanachie Records.
  • 1996. Mega Star. Interra.
  • 1996. Bandit Queen. Milan.
  • 1996. The Prophet Speaks. M.I.L. Multimedia.
  • 1996. Sangam. EMI.
  • 1997. Live In India. RPG.
  • 1997. Akhian. M.I.L. Multimedia.
  • 1997. Live in New York City. M.I.L. Multimedia.
  • 1997. Farewell Song: Alwadah. M.I.L. Multimedia.
  • 1997. In Concert in Paris, Vol 2. Ocora.
  • 1997. Oriente/Occidente: Gregorian Chant & Qawwali Music. Materiali Sonori.
  • 1997. Dust to Gold, Realworld Recordings.[8]
  • 1998. Allah & The Prophet. Ex Works.
  • 1998. Star Rise: Remixes. EMI.[9]
  • 1998. Live at Royal Albert Hall. M.I.L. Multimedia.
  • 1998. Missives from Allah. BCD.
  • 1998. Imprint: In Concert. Hi Horse Records. (Selections from the 23 January 1993 concert at Meany Hall, University of Washington in Seattle, during Khan's residency at their Ethnomusicology program.)
  • 1999. Peace. Omni Parc.
  • 1999. Live at Islamabad, Vol 1–2. M.I.L. Multimedia.
  • 1999. Passion. NYC Music.
  • 1999. Visions of Allah. Ex Works.
  • 1999. Swan Song. Narada.
  • 2000. Jewel. MoviePlay.
  • 2000. Live in London, Vol 3. Navras Records.
  • 2001. Opus. Vanstory.
  • 2001. The Final Studio Recordings. Legacy/Sony.
  • 2001. Pukaar: The Echo. Navras Records.
  • 2001. The Final Moment. Birdman Records.
  • 2002. Body and Soul. RealWorld/CEMA.
  • 2002. Sufi Qawwalis. Arc Music.
  • 2004. Allah Hoo. Saregama.
  • 2004. Aur Pyar Ho Gaya. Saregama.
  • 2004. Ishq Da Rutba. Saregama.
  • 2004. Kartoos. Saregama.
  • 2004. Main Aur Meri Awargi. Saregama.
  • 2004. Ye Jo Halka. Saregama.
  • 2005. Nami Danam. JVC Compact Discs.
  • 2010. Mitter Pyare Nu. Nupur Audio

Album featuresEdit

Film soundtracksEdit

Bollywood soundtracks
Western soundtracks

SinglesEdit

  • Sohna Mukhra Vol. 82 - OSA
  • Saqi Mere Saqi Vol. 29 - OSA
  • Jana Jogi De Nal Vol 42. - OSA
  • Jewel Vol 48. - OSA
  • Masoom Vol. 66 - OSA
  • Tauba - Hi-Tech Music
  • Mere Rashke Qamar - Hi-Tech Music
  • Mere Rashke Qamar (Complete Original Version) - Hi-Tech Music
  • Mere Rashke Qamar (Duet Version ft. Naseebo Lal) - Hi-Tech Music
  • Mere Rashke Qamar (ft. Rahat Fateh Ali Khan) - Hi-Tech Music
  • Mere Rashke Qamar (Remix) - Hi-Tech Music
  • Shikwa/Jawab-e-Shikwa Vol.72 - OSA
  • Rehmat Ka Jhoomer Vol. 108 - OSA
  • Haq Ali Ali Vol. 126 - OSA
  • Sochta Hoon - Hi-Tech Music
  • Dard-e-Gham - Venus Worldwide Entertainment
  • Main Khuda Ki Sanaa Gaon Ga - MRC
  • Mast Mast (Massive Attack Remix) - Real World Records/Virgin
  • Dama Dum Mast - OSA

FilmsEdit

DocumentariesEdit

  • Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan: le dernier prophète (1996). Directed by Jérôme de Missolz.
  • Nusrat has Left the Building... But When? (1997). Directed by Farjad Nabi. (This 20-minute docudrama focuses on Khan's early career.)
  • A Voice from Heaven (1999). Directed by Giuseppe Asaro. New York, NY: Winstar TV & Video. (This 75-minute documentary, available on VHS and DVD, provides an introduction to Khan's life and work.)
  • Samandar Main Samandar (2007). A documentary aired on Geo TV detailing Khan's career.
  • The King of Qawalli (2009). A short film aired on Dawn News about Khan's life and career.

Concert filmsEdit

  • The JVC Video Anthology of World Music and Dance (1990). Video 14 (of 30) (South Asia IV). Produced by Ichikawa Katsumori; directed by Nakagawa Kunikiko and Ichihashi Yuji; in collaboration with the National Museum of Ethnology, Osaka. [Tokyo]: JVC, Victor Company of Japan; Cambridge, Massachusetts: distributed by Rounder Records. Features a studio performance by Khan and Party (two Urdu-language songs: a Hamd, and a Manqabat for Khwaja Mu'inuddin Chishti. Filmed in Tokyo, Japan, 20 September 1987, for Asian Traditional Performing Arts).
  • Nusrat! Live at Meany (1998). Produced by the University of Washington. 87-minute recording of a concert of 23 January 1993 at Meany Hall, University of Washington in Seattle, during Khan's residency at the ethnomusicology program there.
  • Live in Concert in the UK, (DVD, vols. 1–17) [OSA]; recorded between 1983 and 1993
  • Akhiyan Udeek Diyan (DVD) [Nupur Audio]
  • Je Tun Rab Nu Manauna (DVD) [Nupur Audio]
  • Yaadan Vicchre Sajan Diyan Aayiyan (DVD) [Nupur Audio]
  • Rang-e-Nusrat (DVD, vols. 1–11) [Music Today]; recorded between 1983 and 1993 (same material as the OSA DVDs)
  • VHS videotapes, vols. 1–21 [OSA]; recorded between 1983 and 1993 (same material as the OSA DVDs)
    • Luxor Cinema Birmingham (VHS vol. 1, 1979)
    • Digbeth Birmingham (VHS vol. 2, 1983)
    • St. Francis Hall Birmingham (VHS vol. 3, 1983)
    • Royal Oak Birmingham (VHS vol. 4, 1983)
    • Private Mehfil (Wallace Lawley Centre, Lozells Birmingham, November 1983) (VHS vol. 5)
    • Private Mehfil (VHS vol. 6, 1983)
    • Natraj Cinema Leicester (VHS vol. 7, 1983)
    • Live in Southall (VHS vol. 8)
    • Live in Bradford (VHS vol. 9, 1983)
    • Live in Birmingham (VHS vol. 10, 1985)
    • Allah Ditta Hall (VHS vol. 11, 1985)
    • Harrow Leisure Centre (VHS vol. 12)
    • University of Aston (VHS vol. 13, 1988)
    • Aston University (VHS vol. 14, 1988)
    • WOMAD Festival Bracknell (VHS vol. 15, 1988)
    • Live in Paris (VHS vol. 16, 1988)
    • Poplar Civic Centre London (VHS vol. 17)
    • Imperial Hotel Birmingham (VHS vol. 18, 1985)
    • Slough Gurdawara (SHABADS) (VHS vol. 19)
    • Imran Khan Cancer Appeal (VHS vol. 20)
    • Town Hall Birmingham (VHS vol. 21, 1993)

SalesEdit

The following are known sales of records with songs credited to Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, either as a vocalist, composer, or special thanks.

Credited
Year Title Sales Ref Region(s)
1996 Sangam 1,000,000 [14] India
1997 Only One 6,000,000 [10] Worldwide
Vande Mataram 2,000,000 [15]
Aur Pyaar Ho Gaya 1,500,000 [16] India
"Afreen Afreen" 500,000 [17]
1999 Kachche Dhaage 3,000,000 [16] India
2000 Dhadkan 4,500,000 [18]
2007 Guru 1,150,000
Total known sales 19,650,000 Worldwide

The following are known Indian sales of Bollywood soundtrack albums featuring copied versions of songs originally composed by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, without crediting him.

Uncredited
Year Title Sales Ref
1994 Mohra 8,000,000 [19][20]
1995 Yaraana 2,000,000 [16][21]
1996 Raja Hindustani 11,000,000 [16][21]
Auzaar 2,200,000 [16][22]
1997 Judaai 2,000,000 [16][21]
Koyla 1,800,000 [16][23]
Total known sales 27,000,000

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 'Chris Nickson '-GlobalRhythm, "Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan "
  2. ^ "Ustad Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan - Daily Times Cover"
  3. ^ "Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan Dead at 48". Rolling Stone, August 18, 1997
  4. ^ "Sorrows, Vol. 69 by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan". iTunes. Retrieved 20 December 2018.
  5. ^ "Nitin Sawhney". Guardian Observer, 17 June 2004 Observer.co.uk
  6. ^ "Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan Chart History". Billboard
  7. ^ Peter Steven (9 January 2010). The No-nonsense Guide to Global Media. New Internationalist. pp. 91–. ISBN 978-1-906523-40-4.
  8. ^ "Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan and Party Dust To Gold - RealWorld". Roots World Dave Dalle
  9. ^ "Album Review: Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan & Michael Brook’s Star Rise ". MTV News, by Kembrew McLeod 1/13/1998
  10. ^ a b "Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan's 'lost tape recordings' found". The News International. 5 July 2017.
  11. ^ Iyengar, Shriram (3 October 2016). "The guru of peace: Ustad Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan". Cinestaan.
  12. ^ "Simmba song Tere Bin: Check out the recreated version of the classic Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan track ft. Ranveer Singh and Sara Ali Khan". Times Now. 14 December 2018.
  13. ^ Dudrah, Rajinder Kumar (2006). Bollywood: Sociology Goes To the Movies. SAGE Publishing. p. 161. ISBN 9789352805365.
  14. ^ Kumar, Keval J. (2000). Mass Communication in India (4th Edition). Jaico Publishing House. p. 320. ISBN 9788172243739.
  15. ^ Mathai, Kamini (2009). A. R. Rahman: The Musical Storm. Penguin Group. p. 160. ISBN 9788184758238.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g "Music Hits 1990-1999 (Figures in Units)". Box Office India. Retrieved 1 January 2010.
  17. ^ "Music-video pioneer Ken Ghosh defies his critics to remain industry's best bet". India Today. 4 August 1997.
  18. ^ "Music Hits 2000–2009 (Figures in Units)". Box Office India. Archived from the original on 24 June 2010.
  19. ^ "Top 25 films between the years 1985-1994". Filmfare. 18 February 2018.
  20. ^ Amit Baruah, R. Padmanabhan (6 September 1997). "The stilled voice". The Hindu, Frontline.
  21. ^ a b c "Five Songs That Bollywood Blatantly Copied From Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan". News18. 13 October 2016.
  22. ^ Chaudhuri, Diptakirti (2018). Bioscope: A Frivolous History of Bollywood in Ten Chapters. Hachette. p. 93. ISBN 9789351952299.
  23. ^ "42 hit songs that Bollywood copied from Pakistani films". Daily Pakistan. 7 September 2017. Retrieved 8 September 2017.

External linksEdit