Northwestern University Dance Marathon

The Northwestern University Dance Marathon, commonly known as NUDM, is a philanthropic dance marathon held every March at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Founded in 1975,[1] NUDM is one of the nation's most established and largest entirely student-run philanthropies.[citation needed] NUDM is one of the only annual Dance Marathons in the country to continually change its primary beneficiary. NUDM has raised over $1 million for its beneficiaries each year since 2011,[1] and involves over 1,000 students participating as dancers and committee members. Since 1997, the Evanston Community Foundation has been NUDM's secondary beneficiary.

Northwestern University
Dance Marathon
AbbreviationNUDM
Formation1975 (1975)
PurposePhilanthropy
Location
Volunteers
1,500
WebsiteOfficial website

Recent marathonsEdit

2020Edit

In 2020, NUDM supported Children's Home and Aid and the Evanston Community Foundation (ECF). NUDM focused its efforts on supporting Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Child & Family Center, located in Evanston, via both fundraising and service. The 30-hour dance marathon was unexpectedly and unprecedentedly canceled in 2020 by the Northwestern Administration on March 4th, two days before it was set to kick-off, due to health concerns with “uncertainty surrounding COVID-19” (i.e. novel coronavirus). The NUDM Executive Board ultimately implemented a "virtual" NUDM, posting videos, quotes and thank you's via social media, which raised over $1 million - $1,029,366 exactly.

2019Edit

For its 45th year, NUDM supported Communities in Schools of Chicago (CIS) and the Evanston Community Foundation, raising $1,114,514.62.[2] CIS is a nonprofit organization that works to ensure that each and every public school student in Chicago graduates high school prepared for success. CIS believes that dropping out of school is a continuous process, not a single event— and so they strive to connect students to mentors and resources to end that process. [3]

2018Edit

In 2018, NUDM raised $1,175,709.82 for Cradles to Crayons and the Evanston Community Foundation.[4] Cradles to Crayons provides children from birth through age 12, living in homeless or low-income situations, with the essential items they need to thrive – at home, at school and at play. To further Cradles to Crayons’ cause, NUDM celebrated a yearlong philanthropic effort to connect communities and enable childhood dreams.

2017Edit

In May 2016, GiGi's Playhouse was announced as the primary beneficiary for NUDM 2017.[5] GiGi's Playhouse is a nationwide network of Down syndrome achievement centers that impacts the lives of children and adults with Down syndrome through free educational and therapeutic programs.[6] Through its partnership with GiGi's, NUDM hopes to improve the lives of individuals with Down syndrome and simultaneously share a message of global acceptance for people of all abilities.

For the 20th consecutive year,[7] the Evanston Community Foundation was announced as NUDM 2017's secondary beneficiary to honor the close relationship between Northwestern University and the city of Evanston.

2016Edit

NUDM 2016 raised $1,201,216.24[8] for Blessings in a Backpack, a leading childhood hunger organization that mobilizes communities, individuals and resources to provide food on the weekends for elementary school children across America. NUDM fed more than 9,400 elementary schoolers that come from food insecure homes and made a direct impact on hunger in the Evanston and Chicago area, through both the expansion of programs at existing schools and the initiation of programs at new schools.

2015Edit

In 2015, NUDM raised $1,130,979 for Starlight Children's Foundation, a global organization that supports critically and chronically ill children and their families from hospital to home. This money supported the creation of 11 "Starlight Sites," beautifully designed pediatric treatment rooms and playrooms reaching nearly 477,865 children in just one year.

2014Edit

For its 40th year, NUDM supported Team Joseph, raising a record-breaking $1,385,273[9] to fund research to find a cure for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. This remains the highest total ever raised for the event.

HistoryEdit

Forty-seven years ago, Dance Marathon, the philanthropic child of Alpha Tau Omega fraternity and the Associated Student Government, was born on the Northwestern University campus.[1]

 
NUDM in 1988

The Dance Marathon was inspired by NU's participation in the University of Illinois dance marathon in 1974. After representing NU at UI, Jan Jacobowitz approached Tim Rivelli, Associated Student Government Vice President, with the idea of starting a dance marathon at Northwestern. Tim and Jan met with representatives of the American Epilepsy Foundation and the Dance Marathon was born. Tim's fraternity, ATO, took charge of the operation and ran the dance marathon.

Twenty-one couples danced for NUDM in 1975. It was called the "Dance to Give Them a Chance" marathon then, and it benefited the American Epilepsy Foundation and the National Association for Retarded Citizens. Fifteen couples made it through the fifty-two-hour marathon, raising $9,105 at Blomquist Memorial Gymnasium. The winning couple, Donna Miller and Tony Krileff, was sponsored by Bobb Hall and a local liquor store.[1]

NUDM 1976 saw a new venue as the dancing was moved to Patten Gym and the dancing time was lessened to twenty-six hours. When the sponsor decided to discontinue the event after two years, Triangle Fraternity picked up the mantle and looked for a venue where other fund-raising events were possible. In 1977, NUDM found its current home: the Norris University Center, where students have been dancing for thirty hours at a time ever since. To institutionalize the event for the long haul and ensure a continuing flow of good ideas from students, organizers turned it into a campus-wide charitable event.[1]

Special events to raise extra money for the cause were added over the years, like the NUDM Spa, where manicures and haircuts are given in Norris during the weekend of NUDM. Other events take place to keep the rest of the campus involved while the dancers are busy, such as a DDR tournament and performances by on-campus groups.

Chicago's The Second City comedy troupe paid a visit in 1984. Since that time, popular bands and performers have been a highlight of the weekend of, including Northwestern alumnus Jay Sims, who has been DJing a portion of the event every year since 1996. NUDM has attracted the attention of celebrities such Barack Obama, George and Barbara Bush, Frank Sinatra, Jr., Adam Sandler, the cast of Modern Family,[10] and NU alumni David Schwimmer, Seth Meyers, Stephen Colbert and Mike Greenberg. Chicago celebrities, like former mayor Jane Byrne and Chicago Bears players Mike Tomczak, Keith Van Horne and Trace Armstrong, have also danced.[1]

In 2011, NUDM was named The Most Influential College Organization at the 2011 Stay Classy Awards after its record-breaking year.[11]

List of NUDM Primary BeneficiariesEdit

Year Beneficiary Total Raised (USD) Primary Beneficiary Check (USD)
2021 Compass to Care TBD TBD
2020 Children's Home & Aid[12] $1,029,366 $903,787
2019 Communities In Schools of Chicago $1,144,515 $911,861[13]
2018 Cradles to Crayons $1,175,709[14] $942,793[15]
2017 GiGi's Playhouse[16] $1,253,596 $983,833[17]
2016 Blessings in a Backpack[18] $1,201,216 $965,057[19]
2015 Starlight Children’s Foundation[20] $1,130,979 $863,490[21]
2014 Team Joseph[22] $1,385,273 $931,289[23]
2013 The Danny Did Foundation[24] $1,214,632 $741,394[25]
2012 The Andrew McDonough B+ (Be Positive) Foundation[26] $1,107,670 $717,770[27]
2011 Children's Heart Foundation $1,019,130 $632,689[28]
2010 StandUp for Kids[29] $854,396 $461,547[30]
2009 Project Kindle[31] $917,834 $576,470[32]
2008 Bear Necessities[33] $933,855 $590,000[34]
2007 Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy[35] $708,711 $423,028[36][37]
2006 Pediatric AIDS Chicago Prevention Initiative (PACPI)[38] $686,377 $400,048[39]
2005 Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation $625,131 $374,004[40]
2004 Have Dreams[41] $461,294 $319,997[42][43]
2003 Chicago Urban Youth Scholarship Fund $462,613 $300,723[44]
2002 Little Heroes Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation (formerly known as Friends for Steven) $492,000 $380,000[45]
2001 Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation[46] $540,257 $393,172[47]
2000 Gilda's Club Chicago[48] $537,645
1999 Children's Heart Foundation $450,833[49]
1998 La Rabida Children's Hospital and Research Center $431,524
1997 Hope for Gus Foundation[50] $405,563
1996 Make-A-Wish Foundation of Northern Illinois[51] $315,143
1995 Pediatrics AIDS Ward of Children's Memorial Hospital (now Lurie Children's Hospital) $301,023
1994 Leukemia Research Foundation[52] $250,258
1993 American Heart Association $200,438
1992 American Diabetes Association $273,000
1990 The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society $136,300
1989 The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (formerly The Leukemia Society of America) $112,628
1988 Howard Brown Health Center $112,734
1987 Cystic Fibrosis Foundation $112,628
1986 Easter Seals $90,021
1985 United Cerebral Palsy[53] $86,242
1984 Easter Seals $76,663
1983 Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation $66,089
1982 National Multiple Sclerosis Society $60,428
1981 Arthritis Foundation $42,000
1980 Respiratory Health Association of Metropolitan Chicago (formerly the Chicago Lung Association) $33,100
1979 United Cerebral Palsy[53] $30,000
1978 United Way of Metropolitan Chicago $26,507
1977 American Epilepsy Foundation $22,000[54]
1976 American Epilepsy Foundation and the National Association for Retarded Citizens $9,573[55]
1975 American Epilepsy Foundation and the National Association for Retarded Citizens $9,105[56]
Total $22,535,999

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f "About NUDM - Northwestern University Dance Marathon". Retrieved 2016-09-29.
  2. ^ "2019 Annual Report". Northwestern University Dance Marathon. Retrieved 2019-06-03.
  3. ^ marketing (2019-01-16). "NUDM Explained: 2019 Beneficiaries". Northwestern University Dance Marathon. Retrieved 2019-06-03.
  4. ^ Kuta, Sofia (2018-04-04). "NUDM 2018 Wrap Up". Northwestern University Dance Marathon. Retrieved 2019-06-03.
  5. ^ McKeon, Shane (2016-05-25). "GiGi's Playhouse named Dance Marathon's 2017 beneficiary". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2016-09-29.
  6. ^ "About Us". 2012-04-16. Retrieved 2016-09-29.
  7. ^ UGC, Chicago Tribune. "THE EVANSTON COMMUNITY FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES MORE THAN $800,000 AT 2016 GRANT AWARDS CELEBRATION". Retrieved 2016-09-29.
  8. ^ "NUDM 2016 raises $1.2 million for beneficiaries". www.northbynorthwestern.com. Retrieved 2016-09-29.
  9. ^ "40th Dance Marathon Raises Record $1.3 Million: Northwestern University News". www.northwestern.edu. Retrieved 2016-09-29.
  10. ^ "NUDM 2013: Modern Family". Vimeo. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  11. ^ "Northwestern University Dance Marathon Raises Over $1 Million For Charity (PHOTOS)". The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, Inc. 2012-03-05.
  12. ^ Bonifant, Josiah (2019-05-23). "Foster care nonprofit Children's Home & Aid selected as NUDM primary beneficiary". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  13. ^ Karisch, Kristina (2019-03-10). "Dance Marathon 2019 raises over $1.1 million for CIS Chicago, Evanston Community Foundation NU Dance Marathon 2019 raises over $1.1 million for CIS Chicago". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  14. ^ Marathon, NU Dance (10:36 PM - 10 Mar 2018). "#NUDM 2018 has raised $1,175,709.82 to #GrowTogether for @C2CChicago and @EvanstonForever!". @nudm. Retrieved 2018-03-11. Check date values in: |date= (help)
  15. ^ White, Alexis (2018-03-11). "Dance Marathon 2018 raises over $1.1 million for Cradles to Crayons, Evanston Community Foundation". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  16. ^ "GiGis Playhouse - Down Syndrome Achievement Centers". GiGis Playhouse - Down Syndrome Achievement Centers.
  17. ^ Karisch, Kristina (2017-03-05). "Dance Marathon 2017 raises over $1.2 million to support GiGi's Playhouse, Evanston Community Foundation". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  18. ^ "Homepage - Blessings in a Backpack". Blessings in a Backpack.
  19. ^ Dugyala, Rishika (2016-03-06). "Dance Marathon raises more than $1.2 million to fight childhood hunger". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  20. ^ Starlight Children’s Foundation Midwest "starlight - STARLIGHT" Check |url= value (help). STARLIGHT.
  21. ^ McCarthy, Ciara (2015-03-08). "Dance Marathon raises more than $1.1 million in 2015". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  22. ^ "Team Joseph". www.teamjoseph.org.
  23. ^ McCarthy, Ciara (2015-03-08). "Dance Marathon raises more than $1.1 million in 2015". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  24. ^ "Advancing Awareness of Epilepsy & SUDEP | Danny Did Foundation". www.dannydid.org.
  25. ^ Diebold, Joseph (2013-03-11). "Tears, memories as Dance Marathon tops $1.2 million in fight against epilepsy". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  26. ^ "B+ Foundation". B+.
  27. ^ Yang, Stephanie (2012-03-03). "Dance Marathon beneficiaries express gratitude for Northwestern's contribution". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  28. ^ Driessen, Katherine (2011-03-05). "DM breaks $1 million for first time, raises record $1,019,130". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  29. ^ "StandUp For Kids | Helping homeless and street kids every day in cities across America". www.standupforkids.org.
  30. ^ Hargis, Lilia (2010-03-29). "Dance Marathon beneficiary StandUp for Kids helps raise awareness of homeless youth". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  31. ^ Inc., Project Kindle. "PROJECT KINDLE - Project Kindle, Inc". Project Kindle, Inc.
  32. ^ Rosenthal, Matt Spector and Brian (2009-03-13). "Dance Marathon Fights Recession, Raises $917K". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  33. ^ "Bear Necessities - Non-profit Pediatric Cancer Foundation". Bear Necessities Pediatric Cancer Foundation.
  34. ^ Truong, Paul Takahashi & Alice (2008-03-12). "Update: DM raises record funds". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  35. ^ "CURE Epilepsy: Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy". www.cureepilepsy.org.
  36. ^ Foley, Elise (2007-03-26). "Leading Couple Raises $5,500". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  37. ^ "You searched for citizens united for research epilepsy - Page 3 of 4". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  38. ^ "PACPI – Pediatric AIDS Chicago Prevention Initiative". PACPI – Pediatric AIDS Chicago Prevention Initiative.
  39. ^ "M is for money". The Daily Northwestern. 2006-03-28. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  40. ^ Hill, Evan (2005-03-29). "DM grooves way to new fund-raising high". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  41. ^ "Home - Have Dreams". Have Dreams.
  42. ^ Hill, Evan (2005-03-29). "DM grooves way to new fund-raising high". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  43. ^ Pandell, Jerome C. (2004-03-29). "Charity easier to connect with this year (Dance Marathon 2004)". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  44. ^ Pandell, Jerome C. (2004-03-29). "Charity easier to connect with this year (Dance Marathon 2004)". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  45. ^ Ward, Erin (2002-10-28). "DM swaps beneficiaries". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  46. ^ "Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation". Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation.
  47. ^ Gupta, Rani (2001-03-29). "Participants, beneficiaries savor the last dance at first ever DM post-party". The Daily Northwestern. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  48. ^ "Gilda's Club Chicago |". www.gildasclubchicago.org.
  49. ^ "Dance Marathon". www.northwestern.edu. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  50. ^ "Hope For Gus Foundation | Funding Research for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy". hopeforgus.org.
  51. ^ "Make-A-Wish® Illinois". Make-A-Wish® Illinois.
  52. ^ "Home | Leukemia Research Foundation". www.allbloodcancers.org.
  53. ^ a b "United Cerebral Palsy". ucp.org.
  54. ^ "Northwestern University Sesquicentennial". www.nu150.northwestern.edu. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  55. ^ "Upsilon | Kappapedia". wiki.kappakappagamma.org. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  56. ^ "Dance Marathon". www.northwestern.edu. Retrieved March 24, 2017.

External linksEdit