Minister of State for Care and Mental Health

The Minister of State for Care and Mental Health is a mid-level position in the Department of Health and Social Care in the British government.[1] It is currently held by Gillian Keegan MP who took the office on 16 September 2021. The minister often deputises for the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care alongside the Minister of State for Health. The minister is in charge of social care in England.[1]

Minister of State for Care and Mental Health
Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (HM Government).svg
Official portrait of Gillian Keegan MP.jpg
Incumbent
Gillian Keegan

since 16 September 2021
Department of Health and Social Care
StyleMinister
NominatorPrime Minister of the United Kingdom
AppointerThe Monarch
on advice of the Prime Minister
Term lengthAt Her Majesty's pleasure
Websitehttps://www.gov.uk/government/ministers/minister-of-state--60

HistoryEdit

The position was created in 2006, with Ivan Lewis being made Minister of State for Care Services.[2]

After the Conservative victory in the 2015 United Kingdom general election Alistair Burt returned to Government as Minister of State for Care and Support in the Department of Health. In July 2016, Burt announced that he would be resigning from his Ministerial position, "Twenty-four years and one month ago, I answered my first question as a junior minister in oral questions and I’ve just completed my last oral questions," Burt said. It was made clear that his resignation was not related to Brexit.[3]

The position was given to David Mowat and renamed as Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Care and Support. David Mowat lost his Warrington South seat in the snap 2017 general election.[4] He was not replaced until 2018 when Prime Minister Theresa May appointed Caroline Dinenage as the new Minister of Care.[5] Dinenage stayed in her role when Boris Johnson became Prime Minister and served in the First Johnson ministry and into the Second Johnson ministry.

As part of the 2020 British cabinet reshuffle, a number of junior ministers were moved around. Dinenage was made the new Minister of State for Digital and Culture.[6] Helen Whately was her replacement.[7][8] Helen Whatley has been in charge of government response to social care during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United Kingdom,[9] particularly in reference to vaccination deployment.[10]

On World Mental Health Day 2018, Prime Minister Theresa May appointed Jackie Doyle-Price as the UK's first suicide prevention minister. This occurred while the UK government hosted the first ever global mental health summit.[11] In July 2019, Backbench MP and former nurse Nadine Dorries was appointed as Minister of State for Mental Health, Suicide Prevention and Patient Safety by the incoming Johnson ministry.[12][13] In March 2020, the Department of Health revealed that Dorries had tested positive for COVID-19.[14] She has since recovered. As minister, Dorries has been in charge of mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United Kingdom. In October 2020, the minister addressed mental health concerns around the suicide risks of women with Anorexia.[15] In January 2021, the minister told Parliament the government's response to the Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review.[16] In February 2021, the minister committed to an increase in government spending on mental health as a result of the lockdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic.[17]

Gillian Keegan became the new minister, holding a combined portfolio of care and mental health, at the 2021 British cabinet reshuffle.[18]

ResponsibilitiesEdit

The Minister of State for Care and Mental Health leads on the following:[19]

  • adult social care
  • health and care integration
  • dementia, disabilities and long-term conditions
  • NHS Continuing Healthcare
  • mental health
  • suicide prevention and crisis prevention
  • offender health
  • vulnerable groups
  • women’s health strategy
  • bereavement

Ministerial historyEdit

Social care ministersEdit

Name Portrait Took office Left office Political party Prime Minister
Minister of State for Care Services
Ivan Lewis

MP for Bury South

  15 May 2006 3 October 2008 Labour Tony Blair (2006–2007)
Gordon Brown (2007–2008)
Phil Hope

MP for Corby

  5 October 2008 11 May 2010 Labour Gordon Brown
Paul Burstow

MP for Sutton and Cheam

  11 May 2010 4 September 2012 Liberal Democrat David Cameron
Minister of State for Care and Support
Norman Lamb

MP for North Norfolk

  4 September 2012 8 May 2015 Liberal Democrat David Cameron
Minister of State for Community and Social Care
Alistair Burt

MP for North East Bedfordshire

  11 May 2015 15 July 2016 Conservative David Cameron
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Care and Support
David Mowat

MP for Warrington South

  14 July 2016 9 June 2017 Conservative Theresa May
Minister of State for Social Care
Caroline Dinenage

MP for Gosport

  9 January 2018 13 February 2020 Conservative Theresa May (2018–2019)
Boris Johnson (2019–2020)
Helen Whately

MP for Faversham and Mid Kent

  13 February 2020 16 September 2021 Conservative Boris Johnson

Mental health ministersEdit

Name Portrait Took office Left office Political party Prime Minister
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Mental Health, Suicide Prevention and Patient Safety
Jackie Doyle-Price

MP for Thurrock

  14 June 2017 27 July 2019 Conservative Theresa May
Nadine Dorries

MP for Mid Bedfordshire

  27 July 2019 11 May 2020 Boris Johnson
Minister of State for Mental Health, Suicide Prevention and Patient Safety
Nadine Dorries

MP for Mid Bedfordshire

  11 May 2020 15 September 2021 Conservative Boris Johnson

Minister of State for Care and Mental HealthEdit

Name Portrait Took office Left office Political party Prime Minister
Minister of State for Care and Mental Health
Gillian Keegan

MP for Chichester

  16 September 2021 Incumbent Conservative Boris Johnson

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Minister of State (Minister for Care)". GOV.UK. Retrieved 23 October 2020.
  2. ^ Samuel, Mithran (29 July 2008). "Ivan Lewis challenges adult care sector to deliver". Community Care. Retrieved 20 November 2020.
  3. ^ May, Josh (5 July 2016). "Alistair Burt announces resignation as Health Minister". PoliticsHome.com. Retrieved 8 December 2018.
  4. ^ Coles, Amy (9 June 2017). "Warrington South won by Labour as Faisal Rashid snatches Tory seat". Liverpool Echo. Retrieved 1 November 2020.
  5. ^ "Hft welcomes new Minister of State for Care". Politics Home. 25 February 2020. Retrieved 1 November 2020.
  6. ^ Douglas, Alex (17 February 2020). "New Minister of Care appointed following cabinet reshuffle". Access and Mobility Professional. Retrieved 1 November 2020.
  7. ^ "New jobs for Kent MPs in government reshuffle". Kent Online. 14 February 2020. Retrieved 1 November 2020.
  8. ^ "New Minister of State for Care". Care Management Matters. 14 February 2020. Retrieved 28 October 2020.
  9. ^ "Too soon for families of vaccinated care home residents to visit loved ones, says Helen Whately". inews.co.uk. 1 February 2021. Retrieved 17 February 2021.
  10. ^ "One in three care home workers turned down vaccine, JCVI boss tells MPs". LBC. Retrieved 24 February 2021.
  11. ^ "World Mental Health Day: PM appoints suicide prevention minister". BBC News. 10 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2020.
  12. ^ "Minister of State (Minister for Patient Safety, Suicide Prevention and Mental Health) - GOV.UK". www.gov.uk. Retrieved 31 October 2020.
  13. ^ Shepherd, James (29 July 2019). "New health ministers appointed by incoming prime minister". Nursing Times. Retrieved 31 October 2020.
  14. ^ "Coronavirus: Health minister Nadine Dorries tests positive". BBC News. 11 March 2020. Retrieved 31 October 2020.
  15. ^ "Anorexia deaths: Health minister says government 'committed to learning'". BBC News. 2 December 2020. Retrieved 17 February 2021.
  16. ^ "Update on the government's response to the Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review". GOV.UK. Retrieved 17 February 2021.
  17. ^ Wallace, William (26 February 2021). "The UK mental health crisis coming in Covid's wake". Financial times. Retrieved 9 March 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  18. ^ Channel, FE News: The Future of Education News. "Gillian Keegan moves on from Apprenticeships and Skills Minister to Department of Health and Social Care in Gov #reshuffle". FE News. Retrieved 16 September 2021.
  19. ^ "Gillian Keegan MP". GOV.UK. Retrieved 23 September 2021.

See alsoEdit