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Gosport (UK Parliament constituency)

BoundariesEdit

1974-1983: The Municipal Borough of Gosport.

1983–present: The Borough of Gosport, and the Borough of Fareham wards of Hill Head and Stubbington.

The constituency centres on Peel Common, Chalk Common and the River Alver that run north-south — its largest settlement is arguably the eastern town of Gosport. Gosport post town comprises several distinct villages and neighbourhoods on the south coast of England in Hampshire whereas the constituency comprises the whole of Gosport Borough (including Lee-on-the-Solent and Alverstoke) and includes Stubbington and Hill Head from the neighbouring Fareham Borough.

Constituency profileEdit

Gosport has to date been a Conservative safe seat - although at the 2019 European Parliament Elections, the last occasion that opinion was tested at the ballot box, the Conservative vote collapsed to just 11%, whereas an insurgent Brexit Party took over 50% of the vote; an area with a majority of privately owned properties that has a minority of poor residents — two large housing estates in the south and east of Rowner for example are according to the 2001 census predominantly social housing and contain two of the most deprived output areas in terms of income and unemployment in the United Kingdom however is not of uniform characterisation.[2][3] Rowner has a central conservation area of expensive housing and touches immediately to the west the Lee on Solent Golf Club, Grange Farm Museum, the West of the Alder Nature Reserve and the Wild Grounds Nature reserve. Beside its bowling green, allotments and recreation ground lies Grade I-architecture St Mary's Church.[4] Unlike the generally expensive west of the borough,[3] Rowner resembles central Gosport and Bridgemary in presenting a diverse picture retaining scenic and generally more rural surroundings than the City of Portsmouth with some areas of deprivation.[5]

HistoryEdit

The constituency was created for the February 1974 general election. The area had previously been part of the constituency of Gosport and Fareham.

In December 2009, Gosport became the second constituency to vote in an open primary to select the Conservative PPC. All residents of the area were asked to take part via a postal vote. The result of the Gosport primary saw Caroline Dinenage publicly selected. At the general election on 6 May 2010, Caroline Dinenage was elected with 24,300 votes, a majority of 14,413 votes. Dinenage is currently Minister for Equalities. Since the turn of the century Labour, UKIP and the Liberal Democrats have also finished second.

Peter Viggers (later knighted) had represented the constituency from 1974 to 2010. David Cameron instructed Sir Peter not to stand for re-election after his nationally infamous attempt to claim for a duck house during the MPs' expenses scandal.

Gosport voted Leave at the 2016 United Kingdom European Union membership referendum, by 63.9%, while the local MP Caroline Dinenage campaigned to Remain. At the 2019 European Parliament election in the United Kingdom Gosport voted: Brexit Party (50%); Liberal Democrat Party (15%); Conservative Party (11%); Green Party (10%); Labour Party (6%); UK Independence Party (UKIP) (4%); Change UK (3%). The Gosport Brexit Party’s Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for the forthcoming General Election, John Kennedy, stood as a Candidate for the Brexit Party at the 2019 European Parliamentary Election, for this Seat, forming part of the South East England (European Parliament constituency), on the ticket headed by Brexit Party Leader, Nigel Farage MEP.

Members of ParliamentEdit

ElectionsEdit

Elections in the 2010s (General & European Parliamentary)Edit

Next General election 2019: Gosport[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Brexit Party John Kennedy 0 0 0
Conservative Caroline Dinenage 0 0 0
Green 0 0 0
Labour 0 0 0
Liberal Democrat 0 0 0
Independent 0 0 0
UKIP 0 0 0
Majority 0 0 0
Turnout 0 0 0
 
2019 results
 
2014 results


Elected candidates are shown in bold. Brackets indicate the order candidates were elected and the number of votes per seat won in their respective columns.

European Election 2019: Gosport Constituency South East England[8]
List Candidates Votes % ±
Brexit Party Nigel Farage (1)
Alexandra Lesley Phillips (3)
Robert Andrew Rowland (6)
Belinda Claire De Camborne Lucy (8)
James Gilbert Bartholomew, Christopher Graham Ellis, John Kennedy, Matthew Peter Taylor, George Thomas Stahel Farmer, Peter David Wiltshire
10,666
50.4 N/A
Liberal Democrat Catherine Bearder (2)
Antony Hook (5)
Judith Bunting (9)
Martin Paul Niebuhr Tod, Elizabeth Pendrill Raphael Leffman, Christopher Alan Bowers, Giles Damian Goodall, Ruvi Ziegler, Nicholas David Stanford Perry, John William Vincent
3,240
15 N/A
Conservative Daniel Hannan (7)
Nirj Deva, Richard McDonald Robinson, Mike Whiting, Juliette Katherine Christie Ash, Anna Firth, Adrian Pepper, Clarence Mitchell, Neva Sadikoglu-Novaky, Caroline Anne Newton
2,247 11 N/A
Green Alexandra Phillips (4)
Elise Danielle Benjamin, Vix Lowthion, Leslie Christine Groves Williams, Phelim Mac Cafferty, Jan Hendrik Jamison Doerfel, Larry Sanders, Isabella Lina Marie Moir, Oliver Sykes, Jonathan Christopher St.Aubyn Essex
2,171 10 N/A
Labour John Howarth (10)
Cathy Shutt, Arran Richard Neathey, Emma Christina Turnbull, Rohit K. Dasgupta, Amy Lauren Fowler, Duncan Shaw Thomas Enright, Lubna Aiysha Arshad, Simon Guy Burgess, Rachael Eowyn Ward
1,236 6 N/A
UKIP Piers Wauchope, Elizabeth Fletcher Philips, Daryll James Pitcher, Martin Toby Brothers, Tony Gould, Clive Keith Egan, Troy De Leon, Alan Harvey Stone, Judy Moore, Patricia Ann Mountain 742 3 N/A
Change UK Richard Ashworth, Victoria Groulef, Warren Morgan, Eleanor Mary Fuller, Robin John Bextor, Nicholas Mazzei, Suzana Carp, Phil Murphy, Heather Marion Allen, Diane Helen Yeo 667 3 N/A
UK EU Pacelli Ndikumana, Clinton Powe 59 0 N/A
Independent Jason Guy Spencer McMahon 38 0 N/A
Socialist (GB) Mandy Bruce, Raymond Dennis Carr, David Stanley Chesham, Robert Alexander Cox, Michael Foster, Stephen Harper, Neil Kirk, Anton Charles Pruden, Andrew Brian Thomas-Emans, Darren James Williams 36 0 N/A
Independent David Victor Round 35 0 N/A
Independent Michael Jeffrey Turberville 11 0 N/A
Turnout 21,148 35 N/A
General election 2017: Gosport[9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Caroline Dinenage 30,647 61.9 +6.6
Labour Alan Durrant 13,436 27.2 +12.6
Liberal Democrat Bruce Tennent 2,328 4.7 -2.2
UKIP Chloe Palmer 1,790 3.6 -15.8
Green Monica Cassidy 1,024 2.1 -1.5
Independent Jeffrey Roberts 256 0.5 +0.3
Majority 17,211 34.8 -1.1
Turnout 49,481 67.0 +1.9
Conservative hold Swing -3.0
General election 2015: Gosport[10][11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Caroline Dinenage 26,364 55.3 +3.5
UKIP Christopher Wood 9,266 19.4 +16.3
Labour Alan Durrant 6,926 14.5 −2.4
Liberal Democrat Rob Hylands[12] 3,298 6.9 -14.1
Green Monica Cassidy 1,707 3.6 +2.4
Independent Jeffrey Roberts 104 0.2 N/A
Majority 17,098 35.9 +5.2
Turnout 47,662 65.1 +0.5
Conservative hold Swing -6.4
General election 2010: Gosport[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Caroline Dinenage 24,300 51.8 +7.0
Liberal Democrat Rob Hylands 9,887 21.1 +4.5
Labour Graham Giles 7,944 16.9 −14.5
UKIP Andrew Rice 1,496 3.2 −1.1
BNP Barry Bennett 1,004 2.1 +2.1
English Democrat Bob Shaw 622 1.3 +1.3
Green Claire Smith 573 1.2 -1.7
Independent Dave Smith 493 1.1 +1.1
Independent Charlie Read 331 0.7 +0.7
Independent Brian Hart 289 0.6 +0.6
Majority 14,413 30.7
Turnout 46,939 64.6 +3.3
Conservative hold Swing +1.3

Elections in the 2000sEdit

General election 2005: Gosport[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Viggers 19,268 44.8 +1.2
Labour Richard Williams 13,538 31.5 −5.6
Liberal Democrat Roger Roberts 7,145 16.6 +1.5
UKIP John Bowles 1,825 4.2 +1.3
Green Claire Smith 1,258 2.9 +2.9
Majority 5,730 13.3
Turnout 43,034 60.5 3.4
Conservative hold Swing +3.4
General election 2001: Gosport[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Viggers 17,364 43.6 ±
Labour Richard Williams 14,743 37.1 +6.4
Liberal Democrat Roger Roberts 6,011 15.1 −4.5
UKIP John Bowles 1,162 2.9 N/A
Socialist Labour Kevin Chetwynd 509 1.3 N/A
Majority 2,621 6.5
Turnout 39,789 57.1 -13.1
Conservative hold Swing -3.2

Elections in the 1990sEdit

General election 1997: Gosport[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Viggers 21,085 43.6 -14.5
Labour Ivan Gray 14,827 30.7 +17.1
Liberal Democrat Steve Hogg 9,479 19.6 -8.0
Referendum Andrew Blowers 2,538 5.3 N/A
Independent Patrick Ettie 426 0.9 N/A
Majority 6,258 12.9 -17.6
Turnout 48,355 70.3
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1992: Gosport[17][18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Viggers 31,094 58.1 −0.4
Liberal Democrat MG Russell 14,776 27.6 −3.9
Labour Mrs MF Angus 7,275 13.6 +3.7
Independent PFF Ettie 332 0.6 +0.6
Majority 16,318 30.5 +3.6
Turnout 53,477 76.6 +1.8
Conservative hold Swing +1.8

Elections in the 1980sEdit

General election 1987: Gosport[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Viggers 29,804 58.5
Liberal Peter John Chegwyn 16,081 31.57
Labour Alan Lloyd 5,053 9.92
Majority 13,723 26.94
Turnout 74.78
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1983: Gosport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Viggers 28,179 60.64
Liberal Peter John Chegwyn 13,728 29.54
Labour B.B. Bond 4,319 9.29
Independent R.A. MacMillan 241 0.52
Majority 14,451 31.10
Turnout 71.62
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1970sEdit

General election 1979: Gosport
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Viggers 24,553 61.76
Labour J.A. Slater 10,460 26.31
Liberal C. Lewis 4,741 11.93
Majority 14,093 35.45
Turnout 77.47
Conservative hold Swing
General election October 1974: Gosport
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Viggers 17,487 47.51
Labour Peter Marsh Tebutt 10,621 28.85
Liberal Peter Dane Clark 8,701 23.64
Majority 6,866 18.65
Turnout 75.32
Conservative hold Swing
General election February 1974: Gosport
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Viggers 19,563 49.7 N/A
Labour Graham John Hewitt 12,335 31.3 N/A
Liberal John George Rodway Rix 7,485 19.0 N/A
Majority 7,228 18.4 N/A
Turnout 81.36 N/A
Conservative win (new seat)

See alsoEdit

Notes and referencesEdit

Notes
  1. ^ A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
References
  1. ^ "Electorate Figures - Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Archived from the original on 6 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  2. ^ 2001 census statistics
  3. ^ a b Local House Price Map - Mouseprice.com
  4. ^ Historic England. "Details from listed building database (1276419)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 17 December 2012.
  5. ^ Ordnance survey website
  6. ^ ‹The template Rayment-hc is being considered for deletion.› Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "G" (part 2)
  7. ^ "Gosport parliamentary constituency". BBC News.
  8. ^ "Statement of Parties and Individual Candidates Nominated - Notice of Poll - 23 May 2019" (PDF). Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  9. ^ "Gosport parliamentary constituency". BBC News.
  10. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  11. ^ "County councillor stands against Tory MP". Portsmouth.co.uk. Retrieved 2014-02-14.
  12. ^ http://www.libdems.org.uk/general_election_candidates#South East
  13. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  14. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  15. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  16. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  17. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  18. ^ "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Retrieved 2010-12-06.
  19. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  20. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.

Coordinates: 50°48′N 1°10′W / 50.80°N 1.17°W / 50.80; -1.17