Meziměstí

Meziměstí (German: Halbstadt) is a town in Náchod District in the Hradec Králové Region of the Czech Republic. It has about 2,400 inhabitants. It lies on the border with Poland.

Meziměstí
Centre with the town hall
Centre with the town hall
Flag of Meziměstí
Coat of arms of Meziměstí
Meziměstí is located in Czech Republic
Meziměstí
Meziměstí
Location in the Czech Republic
Coordinates: 50°37′29″N 16°14′32″E / 50.62472°N 16.24222°E / 50.62472; 16.24222Coordinates: 50°37′29″N 16°14′32″E / 50.62472°N 16.24222°E / 50.62472; 16.24222
Country Czech Republic
RegionHradec Králové
DistrictNáchod
First mentioned1408
Government
 • MayorPavel Hečko
Area
 • Total25.71 km2 (9.93 sq mi)
Elevation
432 m (1,417 ft)
Population
 (2021-01-01)[1]
 • Total2,360
 • Density92/km2 (240/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code
549 81
Websitewww.mezimesti.cz

Administrative partsEdit

 
Meziměstí Castle

Villages of Březová, Pomeznice, Ruprechtice, Starostín and Vižňov are administrative parts of Meziměstí.

HistoryEdit

The first written mention of Meziměstí is from 1408 under the name Dolní Vižňov. From 1434, it was called by its German name Halbstadt. In 1499, it became a property of Benedictine Broumov Monastery. The abbots of the monastery set up a summer residence here.[2]

In the late 19th century, Meziměstí was industrialized. In 1918, it received its Czech name.[2]

During the German occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1944–1945, the Germans operated a subcamp of the Gross-Rosen concentration camp, whose prisoners were Jewish women from Poland and Hungary, transported from the Auschwitz concentration camp.[3]

After the World War II, the German population was expelled and replaced by Czech settlers. During the 1960s and 1970s, intensive housing construction took place here. In 1992, Meziměstí received the town status.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Population of Municipalities – 1 January 2021". Czech Statistical Office. 2021-04-30.
  2. ^ a b c "Historie města" (in Czech). Město Meziměstí. Retrieved 2021-09-30.
  3. ^ "Subcamps of KL Gross- Rosen". Gross-Rosen Museum in Rogoźnica. Retrieved 14 June 2020.

External linksEdit