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Maryland Women's Hall of Fame

The Maryland Women's Hall of Fame (MWHF) recognizes significant achievements and statewide contributions made by women who are Maryland-natives or state residents. It was established in 1985 by the Maryland Commission for Women and the Women Legislators of Maryland. Honorees are selected by an independent committee each year and are inducted in March during Women's History Month.[1][2]

InducteesEdit

Maryland Women's Hall of Fame
Name Image Birth–Death Year Area of achievement Ref(s)
Marielsa A. Bernard 2019 Senior Judge of the Circuit Court for Montgomery County [3]
Augusta T. Chissell (1880–1973) 2019 Suffragist; Vice President of Baltimore NAACP [4]
Dominique Dawes   (b. 1976) 2019 Olympic champion gymnast [5]
Virginia Hall   (1906–1982) 2019 Intelligence officer in Vichy France during World War II [6]
Rosa Gumataotao Rios   (b. 1956) 2019 43rd Treasurer of the United States [7]
Evelyn Williams Townsend (1922–2008) 2019 Community activist; President of the Harriet Tubman Museum and Educational Center [8]
Phyllis B. Trickett (b. 1927) 2019 Community activist; equal rights [9]
Pauline Woo Tsui (1920–2018) 2019 Anti-discrimination activist; co-founder of the Organization of Chinese American Women [10]
Sandra I. Barnes 2018 Child welfare advocate; Assistant Attorney General, Maryland Department of Human Services [11]
Sandra Williams Ortega (b. 1937) 2018 Maryland’s first African American woman commissioned as a U.S. Air Force Officer, community service [12]
Emily Saunders Plummer (1815–1876) 2018 Former slave [13]
Rita L. Robinson (b. 1936) 2018 Professor at Bowie State University [14]
Hattie N. Washington 2018 Professor of Education at Coppin State University [15]
Marsha Coleman-Adebayo   2017 Founder of the No FEAR Institute, an organization devoted to educating the American public about federal sector discrimination and the implementation of the No FEAR Act. [16]
Carolyn Colvin   (b. 1942) 2017 Deputy Commissioner for Social Security [17]
Donna Edwards   (b. 1958) 2017 First African American woman to represent Maryland in the US House of Representatives [18]
Mary Garrett (1854–1915) 2017 Suffragist and philanthropist [19]
Katharine Blodgett Gebbie   (1932–2016) 2017 Astrophysicist [20]
Kathleen Ledecky (b. 1997) 2017 Olympic gold medalist for swimming [21]
Helen Maroulis   (b. 1991) 2017 Gold medalist 2015 World Wrestling Championships [22]
Lilian Welsh (1858–1938) 2017 Physician, educator, suffragist [23]
Sophia Arabatzis Balis 2016 Professor Emeritus of the University of Maryland Dental School [24]
Oretha Bridgwaters-Simms 2016 Educator [25]
Mary C. Goodwillie (1870–1949) 2016 Established the Junior League of Baltimore [26]
Elaine Danforth Harmon   (1919–2015) 2016 2009 Congressional Gold Medal for U.S. Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) during World War II [27]
Joanne Katz 2016 President of the Faculty Senate of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Institutional Review Board chair [28]
Lizette Woodworth Reese   (1856–1935) 2016 Poet [29]
Beverly B. Byron   (b. 1932) 2015 U.S. House of Representatives [30]
E. Gail de Planque (1945–2010) 2015 Physicist, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission [31]
Mary Feik   (1924–2016) 2015 Aviation, pilot, flight engineer, master mechanic [32]
Katherine O'Brien 2015 Physician, member of the World Health Organization’s Scientific Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization (SAGE) [33]
Linda L. Singh   (b. 1964) 2015 Adjutant General of the Maryland National Guard [34]
Sue Fryer Ward (1935–2014) 2015 Government service, advocate for human rights [35]
Dorothy F. Bailey 2014 Civic activist [36]
Agnes Kane Callum (1926–2015) 2014 Founding member of the Baltimore Afro American Historical Genealogic Society [37]
Renee E. Fox 2014 Executive director of the Institute for a Healthiest Maryland [38]
Susan K. Goering (b. 1952) 2014 Civil rights attorney [39]
Henrietta Lacks (1920–1951) 2014 HeLa the oldest and most commonly used human cell line came from cervical cancer cells taken from Lacks. [40]
Ann Cipriano Rees 2014 Philanthropist [41]
Helen Delich Bentley   (1923–2016) 2013 Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1985 to 1995 [42]
Jean B. Cryor (1938–2009) 2013 Member of the Maryland House of Delegates for District 15 [43]
Charlene Mickens Dukes 2013 President of Prince George's Community College [44]
Ellen R. Sauerbrey   (b. 1937) 2013 Former head of the United States Department of State's Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration [45]
Linda A. Shevitz 2013 Equity Office Director at the Maryland State Department of Education [46]
Beatrice P. Tignor 2013 Maryland House of Delegates [47]
Maureen Black 2012 Physician [48]
Margaret Dunkle (b. 1947) 2012 Equal opportunities for women in athletics [49]
Nancy K. Kopp   (b. 1943) 2012 Treasurer of Maryland [50]
Alice Manicur 2012 Educator [51]
Diana Gribbon Motz (b. 1943) 2012 United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit [52]
Gwendolyn Rooks 2012 Community service [53]
Carol W. Greider   (b. 1961) 2011 Molecular biologist [54]
Barbara Holdridge (b. 1929) 2011 Co-founder Caedmon Records, founder Stemmer House Publishers [55]
Ligia Peralta 2011 University of Maryland School of Medicine [56]
Gertrude Poe (1915–2017) 2011 Journalist [57]
Lucy Diggs Slowe   (1885–1937) 2011 Advocate for black women [58]
June A. Willenz (b. 1924) 2011 Author, military veterans advocate; Executive Director of the American Veterans Committee (AVC) [59]
Claire M. Fraser   (b. 1955) 2010 Microbiologist [60]
Anne Catharine Hoof Green   (c.1720–1775) 2010 Publisher The Maryland Gazette [61]
Irene Morgan Kirkaldy (1917–2007) 2010 Jailed in 1944 for refusing to give up her seat to a white person on a Greyhound bus; 1946 Irene Morgan v. Commonwealth of Virginia, United States Supreme Court overturned Virginia state law requiring segregation on interstate transportation. [62]
Almira Hart Lincoln Phelps   (1793–1884) 2010 Educator, publisher [63]
Bernice R. Sandler (1928–2019) 2010 Women's rights [64]
Lillie D. Shockney 2010 Leader in breast cancer treatment [65]
Ilia Fehrer (1927–2007) 2009 Environmentalist [66]
Diane Griffin (b. 1940) 2009 University Distinguished Professor, and a Professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, department chair from 1994–2015 [67]
Harriet Legum 2009 Advocate for research and treatment of women's breast cancer [68]
Allyson R. Solomon 2009 Brig. General, Maryland National Guard, Assistant Adjutant General, Air, Maryland National Guard [69]
Anne St. Clair Wright (1910–1993) 2009 Historic preservationist [70]
Ramona McCarthy Hawkins 2008 Pharmacist [71]
Ellen Moses Heller 2008 Judge [72]
Billie Holiday   (1915–1959) 2008 Jazz singer [73]
Pauline Menes (1924–2009) 2008 Maryland House of Delegates [74]
Toby Orenstein (b. 1937) 2008 Patron of the arts [75]
Emily Wilson Walker (1904–2007) 2008 Physician [76]
Annette M. Deener 2007 Brigadier General Maryland National Guard, Director MD Joint Staff Hdqt [77]
Sally T. Grant 2007 Volunteerism, women's right, co-founder of Maryland Women's Hall of Fame [78]
Prasanna Nair 2007 Primary Health Care physician, specifically with infants of mothers with HIV/AIDS or substance abuse issues [79]
Karen H. Rothenberg 2007 Dean, Marjorie Cook Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Law School [80]
Audrey E. Scott 2007 Community activist [81]
Susan P. Baker 2006 Doctor of Public Health [82]
Liebe Sokol Diamond (1931–2017) 2006 Orthopedics [83]
Bea Gaddy (1933–2001) 2006 City Council Woman, advocate for the poor and the homeless [84]
Marilyn Hughes Gaston (b. 1939) 2006 Physician [85]
Rebecca Alban Hoffberger (b. 1952) 2006 Founder American Visionary Art Museum [86]
Grace Snively 2006 Civil rights, community activism [87]
Shoshanna Shoubin Cardin (b. 1926) 2005 Philanthropist, volunteerism [88]
Bessie Olive Cole (1883–1971) 2005 "First Lady of Maryland Pharmacy" [89]
Susan R. Panny 2005 Physician [90]
Edyth H. Schoenrich 2005 Health care [91]
Emily Edmonson   (1835–1895) 2004 Freed black woman, abolitionist [92]
Nancy T. Grasmick 2004 Former Maryland state Superintendent of Schools [93]
Esther McCready (b. 1931) 2004 Nurse, educator [94]
Margaret Byrd Rawson (1899–2001) 2004 Dyslexia research [95]
Vivian V. Simpson (1903–1987) 2004 Lawyer [96]
Virginia Walcott Beauchamp (1920–2019) 2003 Author, woman's advocate [97]
Edith Clarke (1883–1959) 2003 First woman employed as an electrical engineer in the United States, as well as the country's first female professor of electrical engineering [98]
Kathryn J. DuFour (1910–2005) 2003 Chief justice, Sixth Judicial Circuit Court of Maryland [99]
Ruth L. Kirschstein (1926–2009) 2003 Pathologist [100]
Etta H. Maddox (c1860–1933) 2003 Lawyer, suffragette [101]
Deborah A. Yow (b. 1950) 2003 Athletic Director for the University of Maryland [102]
Mabel Houze Hubbard (1936–2006) 2002 Judge, first African-American woman to serve as a judge of the District Court of Maryland [103]
Florence P Kendall (1910–2006) 2002 Physical therapist [104]
Mary Young Pickersgill   (1776–1857) 2002 Flag maker during the War of 1812; sewed the Star-Spangled Banner (flag) [105]
Lorraine Sheehan (1937–2009) 2002 Maryland General Assembly [106]
Kathleen Feeley (b. 1929) 2001 Former president College of Notre Dame of Maryland [107]
Misbah Khan, MD, MPH, FAAP 2001 Pediatrician, medical school teacher and researcher, health policy advisor, and medical director for numerous community health programs [108]
Charmaine Krohe 2001 Founder St. Ambrose Family Outreach Center [109]
Eunice Kennedy Shriver   (1921–2009) 2001 Special Olympics [110]
Sandra W. Tomlinson 2001 Educator [111]
Constance Uriolo Battle 2000 Pediatrician [112]
Lois Green Carr (1922–2015) 2000 Economic and social historian, specialist in the history of colonial Maryland[113] [114]
Sonia Pressman Fuentes (b. 1928) 2000 Co-founder National Organization for Women [115]
Josephine Jacobsen (1908–2003) 2000 Poet, short story writer, critic [116]
Rosetta Stith 2000 Director of the Laurence G. Paquin Middle/Secondary School for Expectant Teenage Mothers [117]
Florence Riefle Bahr (1909–1998) 1999 Artist [118]
Lillian C. Compton (1884–1973) 1999 Educator [119]
Edith Houghton Hooker   (1879–1948) 1999 Suffragette, first woman accepted into Johns Hopkins University Medical School [120]
Elizabeth Fran Johnson (b. 1928) 1999 Educator, volunteerism [121]
Bernice Smith White (b. 1924) 1999 Community activist, women's equality [122]
Constance Ross Beims (b. 1938) 1998 Educator [123]
Mary Katherine Goddard (1738–1816) 1998 Publisher, postmistress [124]
Elaine Ryan Hedges (1927–1997) 1998 Journalist with the Feminist Press [125]
Mary Carter Smith (1919–2007) 1998 Poet, story teller [126]
Diane L. Adams (b. 1948) 1997 Physician [127]
Sol del Ande Mendez Eaton (b. 1936) 1997 Research chemist, civil rights, women's rights, health care [128]
Catherine R. Gira (1932–2019) 1997 Educator [129]
Helen L. Koss (1922–2008) 1997 Maryland House of Delegates [130]
Rosa Ponselle   (1897–1981) 1997 Opera singer, honored on a U.S. postage stamp [131]
Madeleine L. Ellicott (1856–1945) 1996 Women's suffrage [132]
Ethel Llewellyn Ennis   (1932–2019) 1996 Jazz musician [133]
Mary Digges Lee (1745–1805) 1996 Provided aid to George Washington's troops [134]
Brigid G. Leventhal   (1935–1994) 1996 Physician [135]
Barbara A. Robinson   (b. 1938) 1996 Maryland House of Delegates [136]
Jill Moss Greenberg (b. 1943) 1995 Volunteerism, civil rights, women's rights [137]
Mary L. Nock (1903–1987) 1995 Maryland General Assembly [138]
Amanda Taylor Norris (1849–1944) 1995 First woman physician in Maryland [139]
Nettie Barcroft Taylor (1914–2016) 1995 Library services [140]
Euphemia Mary Goldsborough Willson (1836–1896) 1995 Nurse during the Civil War [141]
Rosalie Silber Abrams (1916–2009) 1994 Maryland House of Delegates, Maryland State Senate, first female and Jewish majority leader of the state Senate. [142]
Mary Elizabeth Banning (1822–1903) 1994 Mycologist, painter, naturalist [143]
Harriet Elizabeth Brown (1907–2009) 1994 1937 legal case against Calvert County; was one of the foundations for the Maryland Teachers Pay Equalization Law [144]
Constance A. Morella   (b. 1931) 1994 United States Ambassador to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [145]
Mary Adelaide Nutting (1858–1948) 1994 Nursing educator [146]
Rosalyn Blake Bell (b. 1923) 1993 Judge [147]
Lucille Clifton (1936–2010) 1993 Poet Laureate of Maryland [148]
Elizabeth King Ellicott (1858–1914) 1993 Women's suffrage [149]
Jean Spencer (1933–1992) 1993 [150]
Martha Ellicott Tyson (1795–1873) 1993 Quaker elder, abolitionist, author [151]
Annie Armstrong   (1850–1938) 1992 Missionary [152]
Anna Ella Carroll   (1815–1894) 1992 Politician [153]
Rose Kushner (1929–1990) 1992 Journalist, author of Why Me? What Every Woman Should Know About Breast Cancer to Save Her Life [154]
Margaret Collins Schweinhaut (1904–1997) 1992 Maryland State Senate [155]
Carmen Delgado Votaw (1934–2017) 1992 Civil rights [156]
Rita Colwell   (b. 1934) 1991 Environmental microbiologist [157]
Mary Elizabeth Lange (1789–1882) 1991 Foundress of the Oblate Sisters of Providence [158]
Claire McCardell (1905–1958) 1991 Fashion designer [159]
Bessie Moses (1893–1965) 1991 Gynecologist and obstetrician who advocated birth control practices for women [160]
Alta Schrock (1911–2002) 1991 First Mennonite woman in the United States to receive her doctoral degree [161]
Lucille Maurer (1922–1996) 1990 Former Maryland Treasurer [162]
Enolia Pettigen McMillan (1904–2006) 1990 First female national president NAACP [163]
Pauli Murray   (1910–1985) 1990 Activist, civil rights, women's rights [164]
Adele Hagner Stamp (1893–1974) 1990 Dean of Women Emeritus from the University's Board of Regents [165]
Mary Lemist Titcomb (1857–1932) 1990 Library services [166]
Bertha Sheppard Adkins (1906–1983) 1989 Under Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare under Dwight D. Eisenhower [167]
Eugenie Clark   (1922–2015) 1989 Ichthyologist [168]
Lavinia Margaret Engle   (1892–1979) 1989 Maryland House of Delegates, Montgomery County Board of Commissioners, organizer, National American Women's Suffrage Association, director and co-founder Maryland League of Women Voters, various positions within the Social Security Administration and the Welfare Administration. [169]
Lena King Lee (1906–2006) 1989 Maryland House of Delegates [170]
Estelle R. Ramey (1917–2006) 1989 Professor George Washington University Medical School [171]
Barbara A. Mikulski   (b. 1936) 1988 United States Senate [172]
Sadie Kneller Miller   (1867–1920) 1988 Photojournalist [173]
Mary Risteau (1890–1978) 1988 Maryland House of Delegates [174]
Martha Carey Thomas   (1857–1935) 1988 Educator and feminist [175]
Verda Freeman Welcome (1907–1990) 1988 Maryland State Senate [176]
Clara Barton   (1821–1912) 1987 Founder American Red Cross [177]
Frances Ellen Watkins Harper   (1824–1911) 1987 Author, poet, abolitionist [178]
Juanita Jackson Mitchell (1913–1992) 1987 First African American woman to practice law in Maryland [179]
Mary Shaw Shorb (1907–1990) 1987 Research scientist [180]
Helen Brooke Taussig (1898–1986) 1987 Founded the field of pediatric cardiology [181]
Lillie Caroll Jackson (1889–1975) 1986 Civil rights advocate, organized Baltimore branch of NAACP [182]
Elizabeth Ann Seton   (1774–1821) 1986 Roman Catholic Saint [183]
Henrietta Szold   (1860–1945) 1986 Educator, first president of Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization of America [184]
Jeanette Rosner Wolman (1902–1999) 1986 Lawyer and woman's rights advocate [185]
Hiltgunt Zassenhaus (1916–2004) 1986 German philologist who worked as an interpreter in Hamburg, Germany during World War II, and later as a physician in the United States [186]
Margaret Brent   (c.1601–c.1671) 1985 Estate owner, lawyer [187]
Rachel Carson   (1907–1964) 1985 Author Silent Spring [188]
Rita C. Davidson (1928–1984) 1985 First woman on Maryland Court of Appeals [189]
Gladys Noon Spellman   (1918–1988) 1985 United States House of Representatives [190]
Harriet Ross Tubman   (1820–1913) 1985 Abolitionist; escaped slave and conductor on the Underground railroad, suffragette [191]

Further readingEdit

  • Evans, Elizabeth Marshall (1963). Annie Armstrong. Woman's Missionary Union. OCLC 2678646.
  • Willenz, June A. (1983). Women Veterans : America's Forgotten Heroines. Continuum. ISBN 978-0-8264-0241-7. OCLC 9686639.
  • Lois Green, Carr; Philip D, Morgan; Jean Burrell; Institute of Early American History and Culture (Williamsburg, Va.), Russo (1988). Colonial Chesapeake Society. University of North Carolina Press. ISBN 978-0-8078-4343-7. OCLC 17549990.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  • Shady Side (1995). Doc, The Life of Emily Hammond Wilson. Shady Side Rural Heritage Society. ISBN 978-0-9653536-0-1. OCLC 35252169.
  • Fuentes, Sonia Pressman (1999). Eat First – You Don't Know What They'll Give You. Xlibris Corporation. ISBN 978-0-7388-0635-8. OCLC 48559448.
  • Holladay, Hilary (2004). Wild Blessings : The Poetry of Lucille Clifton. Louisiana State University Press. ISBN 978-0-8071-2987-6. OCLC 54806320.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Maryland Women's Hall of Fame". MWHF. Archived from the original on April 3, 2011. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  2. ^ "Maryland Women's Hall of Fame". Maryland Commission for Women. Maryland Department of Human Services. Retrieved 28 March 2019.
  3. ^ "Marielsa A. Bernard". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  4. ^ "Augusta T. Chissell". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  5. ^ "Dominique Dawes". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  6. ^ "Virginia Hall". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  7. ^ "Rosa Gumataotao Rios". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  8. ^ "Evelyn Williams Townsend". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  9. ^ "Phyllis B. Trickett". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  10. ^ "Pauline Woo Tsui". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  11. ^ "Sandra I. Barnes". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  12. ^ "Sandra Williams Ortega, Ph.D." Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  13. ^ "Emily Saunders Plummer". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  14. ^ "Rita L. Robinson, Ph.D." Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  15. ^ "Hattie N. Washington, Ph.D." Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  16. ^ "Marsha Coleman-Adebayo, Ph.D." Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  17. ^ "Carolyn W. Colvin". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  18. ^ "Donna F. Edwards". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  19. ^ "Mary Elizabeth Garrett". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  20. ^ "Katharine Blodgett Gebbie, Ph.D." Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  21. ^ "Kathleen Ledecky". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  22. ^ "Helen Maroulis". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  23. ^ "Lilian Welsh, M.D." Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  24. ^ "Sophia Arabatzis Balis, D.D.S." Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  25. ^ "Oretha Bridgwaters-Simms". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  26. ^ "Mary C. Goodwillie". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  27. ^ "Elaine Danforth Harmon". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  28. ^ "Joanne Katz, Sc.D". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  29. ^ "Lizette Woodworth Reese". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  30. ^ "Byron B. Byron". MWHF. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  31. ^ "E. Gail de Planque". MWHF. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  32. ^ "Mary S. Feik". MWHF. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  33. ^ "Katherine O'Brien". MWHF. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  34. ^ "Linda L. Singh". MWHF. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  35. ^ "Sue Fryer Ward". MWHF. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  36. ^ "Dorothy F. Bailey". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Maryland State Archives. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  37. ^ "Agnes Kane Callum". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Copyright Maryland State Archives. Retrieved January 15, 2016.
  38. ^ "Renee E. Fox, M.D." Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Maryland State Archives. Retrieved January 15, 2016.
  39. ^ "Susan K. Goering". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Maryland State Archives. Retrieved January 15, 2016.
  40. ^ Scherer WF, Syverton JT, Gey GO; Syverton; Gey (1953). "Studies on the propagation in vitro of poliomyelitis viruses. IV. Viral multiplication in a stable strain of human malignant epithelial cells (strain HeLa) derived from an epidermoid carcinoma of the cervix". J. Exp. Med. 97 (5): 695–710. doi:10.1084/jem.97.5.695. PMC 2136303. PMID 13052828.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  41. ^ "Ann Cipriano Rees". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Maryland State Archives. Retrieved January 15, 2016.
  42. ^ "Helen Delich Bentley". Maryland women's Hall of Fame. Maryland State Archives. Retrieved January 15, 2016.
  43. ^ "Jean B. Cryor". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Maryland State Archives. Retrieved January 15, 2016.
  44. ^ Joynt, Carol Ross (March 19, 2013). "Charlene Dukes to Be Inducted Into the Maryland Women's Hall of Fame". Washingtonian.
  45. ^ "Ellen R. Sauerbrey". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Maryland State Archives. Retrieved January 15, 2016.
  46. ^ "Linda A. Shevitz". Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Maryland State Archives. Retrieved January 15, 2016.
  47. ^ "Beatrice P. Tignor, Ed.D." Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Maryland State Archives. Retrieved January 15, 2016.
  48. ^ "Maureen Black". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  49. ^ "Margaret Dunkle". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  50. ^ "Nancy K. Kopp". State of Maryland. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  51. ^ "Alice Manicur". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  52. ^ "Diana Jane Gribbon Motz". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  53. ^ "Gwendolyn G. Rooks". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  54. ^ "Carol W. Greider". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  55. ^ "Barbara Holdridge". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2011.
  56. ^ "Ligia Peralta". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  57. ^ "Gertrude Poe". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  58. ^ "Lucy Diggs Slowe". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  59. ^ "June A. Willenz". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  60. ^ "Claire M. Fraser". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  61. ^ "Ann[e] Catharine Hoof Green". Princeton University Library. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  62. ^ 328 U.S. 373
  63. ^ "Almira Hart Lincoln Phelps". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  64. ^ "Bernice Sandler". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  65. ^ "Lillie D. Shockney". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  66. ^ "Ilia Fehrer". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012."Ilia J. Fehrer, 80". The Baltimore Sun. July 20, 2007. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  67. ^ "Diane E. Griffin". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  68. ^ "Harriet Legum". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  69. ^ "Brigadier General Allyson R. Solomon". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012."Brigadier General Allyson R. Solomon". Maryland National Guard. Archived from the original on 2012-08-31. Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  70. ^ "Anne St. Clair Wright". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  71. ^ "Ramona McCarthy Hawkins". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  72. ^ "Ellen Moses Heller". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  73. ^ "Billie Holiday". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  74. ^ "Pauline Menes". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  75. ^ "Toby Barbara Orenstein". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  76. ^ "Emily Wilson Walker". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  77. ^ "Annette Deener". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012."Brigadier General Annette M. Deener". National Guard Bureau. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  78. ^ "Sally T. Grant". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  79. ^ "Prasanna Nair". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  80. ^ "Karen Rothenberg". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  81. ^ "Audrey E. Scott". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  82. ^ "Susan P. Baker". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  83. ^ "Liebe Sokol Diamond". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  84. ^ "Bea Gaddy". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012."Bea Gaddy's Thanksgiving legacy lives on". The Baltimore Sun. November 18, 2008. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  85. ^ "Marilyn Hughes Gaston". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  86. ^ "Rebecca Hoffberger". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  87. ^ "Grace Snivley". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  88. ^ "Shoshanna Shoubin Cardin". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  89. ^ "Bessie Olive Cole". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  90. ^ "Susan R. Panny". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  91. ^ "Edyth H. Schoenrich". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  92. ^ "Emily Edmonson". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  93. ^ "Nancy Grasmick". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  94. ^ "Esther McCready". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  95. ^ "Margaret Byrd Rawson". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012."Margaret Byrd Rawson, Educator and Dyslexia Authority, Dead at 102". The New York Times. December 1, 2001. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  96. ^ "Vivian V. Simpson". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  97. ^ "Virginia Walcott Beauchamp". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  98. ^ "Edith Clarke". MWHF. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  99. ^ "Kathryn J. DuFour". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  100. ^ "Ruth L. Kirschstein". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  101. ^ "Etta H. Maddox". MWHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
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