March 1932

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The following events occurred in March 1932:

March 1, 1932 (Tuesday)Edit

March 2, 1932 (Wednesday)Edit

March 3, 1932 (Thursday)Edit

March 4, 1932 (Friday)Edit

March 5, 1932 (Saturday)Edit

March 6, 1932 (Sunday)Edit

March 7, 1932 (Monday)Edit

March 8, 1932 (Tuesday)Edit

  • Franklin D. Roosevelt won the New Hampshire presidential primary.[11]
  • Charles Lindbergh's attorney received a third ransom note, informing that an intermediary appointed by the Lindberghs would not be accepted. That same day, a retired school principal in the Bronx named John F. Condon published an offer to act as a go-between and to pay an additional $1,000.[1]

March 9, 1932 (Wednesday)Edit

March 10, 1932 (Thursday)Edit

March 11, 1932 (Friday)Edit

  • The new Irish president Éamon de Valera cut his own salary and that of his cabinet ministers as part of an economy drive.[17]
  • Adolf Hitler issued a statement denying rumors that the Nazis were planning to stage a putsch after Sunday's presidential election. "The National Socialist Movement today has less reason than ever before to abandon the legal path it has taken and on which the system will be forced to its knees", Hitler's statement read. "All of the rumors circulating to the effect that the NSDAP is planning a putsch are false and to be seen as typical signs of our opponents' election campaign."[18]
  • Died: Dora Carrington, 38, British artist (suicide by gunshot); Hermann Gunkel, 69, German biblical scholar

March 12, 1932 (Saturday)Edit

  • Upon the news of Ivar Kreuger's suicide, Sweden's state council rushed to introduce a bill granting a moratorium on the country's debt payments in the event of the suicide creating a business panic.[19]
  • John F. Condon received a fifth ransom note, directing him to a sixth one near a subway station. The note led him to an unidentified man in a cemetery known as "John" with whom payment of the ransom money was discussed.[1]
  • Born: Andrew Young, politician and diplomat, in New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Died: Ivar Kreuger, 52, Swedish civil engineer and industrialist (suicide)

March 13, 1932 (Sunday)Edit

  • The German presidential election was held. Although Paul von Hindenburg beat runner-up Adolf Hitler by more than 7 million votes, he fell less than 1% short of the 50% majority required to win outright, so a run-off election had to be held on April 10.[20]
  • Sweden ordered its stock exchange closed until further notice.[21]

March 14, 1932 (Monday)Edit

March 15, 1932 (Tuesday)Edit

March 16, 1932 (Wednesday)Edit

March 17, 1932 (Thursday)Edit

  • Nazi headquarters throughout Prussia were raided by police looking for evidence of a Nazi plot to plunge the country into civil war. Hitler issued a statement calling the raids "a political maneuver inspired by anxiety over the intended rescue from defeat of the Socialist Party at the forthcoming diet elections", stating further, "I have long known that the raids were planned. Minister Severing knows that the seizure of power by the National Socialists is only a question of time, but this maneuver will not save his party from coming to ruin."[26]
  • The German government declared an "Easter truce" from March 18 to April 3 forbidding open air political meetings, political speeches and distribution of political posters and leaflets.[26]
  • The United States refused to recognize Manchukuo.[27]
  • The film The Wet Parade premiered at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood.[28]
  • Born: Donald N. Langenberg, physicist and professor, in Devils Lake, North Dakota

March 18, 1932 (Friday)Edit

March 19, 1932 (Saturday)Edit

March 20, 1932 (Sunday)Edit

March 21, 1932 (Monday)Edit

March 22, 1932 (Tuesday)Edit

  • The Deep South tornado outbreak ended. A total death toll of 334 was recorded over two days.[34]
  • The Irish government released an official statement declaring that the Irish Free State had the right to modify the constitution by removing the Oath of Allegiance to the king, and that the results of the recent election constituted a mandate to do so.[35]
  • Born: Els Borst, politician, in Amsterdam, Netherlands (d. 2014)

March 23, 1932 (Wednesday)Edit

March 24, 1932 (Thursday)Edit

March 25, 1932 (Friday)Edit

March 26, 1932 (Saturday)Edit

  • A Japanese government spokesman said that Japan would quit the League of Nations if it asserted undue pressure over the situation in Manchuria and Shanghai and that the dispute could only be settled through direct talks with China.[40]

March 27, 1932 (Sunday)Edit

March 28, 1932 (Monday)Edit

March 29, 1932 (Tuesday)Edit

  • British pastor Harold Davidson was brought before court to answer charges that he had pursued and molested young girls. The case became a notorious tabloid sensation.[43][44]
  • Died: Filippo Turati, 74, Italian sociologist, criminologist and Socialist politician

March 30, 1932 (Wednesday)Edit

March 31, 1932 (Thursday)Edit

  • Ford Motor Company announced its V8 engine. Although the V8 was not new, the affordable price made it a true landmark in automotive history.[47]
  • Born: Nagisa Oshima film director and screenwriter, in Tamano, Japan (d. 2013)
  • Died: Eben Byers, 51, American socialite, athlete and industrialist

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "The Lindbergh Kidnapping". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Archived from the original on May 3, 2015. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "1932". Music And History. Archived from the original on April 1, 2015. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  3. ^ "U. S. Orders Out Secret Agents in Lindbergh Hunt". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 3, 1932. p. 2.
  4. ^ Cashman, Sena Dennis (1998). America Ascendant: From Theodore Roosevelt to FDR in the Century of American Power, 1901–1945. New York University Press. p. 278. ISBN 978-0-8147-1566-6.
  5. ^ Powell, John (March 5, 1932). "China Refuses Parley to End War With Japs". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  6. ^ Allen, Jay (March 5, 1932). "League Demans Japan Take Her Troops from Shanghai". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 8.
  7. ^ "Diplomat Wounded By Young Assassin". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 6, 1932. p. 13.
  8. ^ "Tageseinträge für 6. März 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  9. ^ "Peru President Shot at Church by Political Foe". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 7, 1932. p. 1.
  10. ^ "4 Die, 30 Hurt in Jobless Riot at Ford Plant". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 8, 1932. p. 1.
  11. ^ "Smith Beaten by Roosevelt in New Hampshire". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 9, 1932. p. 1.
  12. ^ "Dail Chooses De Valera as Irish President". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 9, 1932. p. 1.
  13. ^ a b Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 412. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  14. ^ "Tageseinträge für 9. März 1932". chronkinet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  15. ^ "Camden, New Jersey – Explosion at the Gas Plant". DVRBS. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  16. ^ "Unite as in War! Germans Urged by Hindenburg". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 11, 1932. p. 1.
  17. ^ Curran, Hugh (March 12, 1932). "De Valera Cuts Own Salary in Economy Drive". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 13.
  18. ^ Domarus, Max (1990). The Complete Hitler: Speeches and Proclamations. Wauconda, Illinois: Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers. p. 121.
  19. ^ Martelius, Martin (March 13, 1932). "Sweden Plans Moratorium in Case of a Panic". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2.
  20. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (March 14, 1932). "Hitler Beaten in Germany". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  21. ^ "Sweden Grants Kreuger Firms a Moratorium". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 14, 1932. p. 8.
  22. ^ "Kreuger Stock Crashes Here After Suicide". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 14, 1932. p. 1.
  23. ^ Giroux, Gary (2013). Business Scandals, Corruption, and Reform: An Encyclopedia. Greenwood Publishing. p. 328. ISBN 978-1-4408-0068-9.
  24. ^ "Bullets Strike Hitler's Train in Mystery Attack". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 16, 1932. p. 5.
  25. ^ "Britain Again Sends Wife of Gandhi to Prison". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 16, 1932. p. 5.
  26. ^ a b Schultz, Sigrid (March 18, 1932). "Politicial Truce is Ordered to Calm Germany". Chicago Daily Tribune. pp. 1, 10.
  27. ^ "Tageseinträge für 17. März 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  28. ^ "1932". Grauman's Chinese. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  29. ^ "Sydney Harbour Bridge". Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  30. ^ "Hohenzollerns' Allies Quit Race for President". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 20, 1932. p. 3.
  31. ^ "March 19, 1932". Plane Crash Info. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  32. ^ "Tageseinträge für 19. März 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  33. ^ "Mexican Bandits Ditch Train; Fail in Attack; 3 Dead". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 21, 1932. p. 3.
  34. ^ a b "Famous Large Tornado Outbreaks in the United States". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  35. ^ Steele, John (March 23, 1932). "Ireland Defies Great Britain on Oath to King". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  36. ^ Shaffer, George (March 24, 1932). "Film Couple Plan Divorce to Save Love". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  37. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (March 24, 1932). "Germany Bans Thirty Hitlerite News Organs". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 8.
  38. ^ "March 24, 1932: The First Broadcast on Moving Train By Belle Baker". Old Radio. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  39. ^ "Tageseinträge für 24. März 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  40. ^ "Stop Interfering or We Will Quit! Japan to League". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 27, 1932. p. 11.
  41. ^ "Tageseinträge für 27. März 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  42. ^ "Tageseinträge für 28. März 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  43. ^ Steele, John (March 30, 1932). "British Church Tries Pastor as Philanderer". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  44. ^ Parry, James (November 5, 2012). "The sad story of the Vicar of Stiffkey". Daily Express. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  45. ^ "Chief of Poland Assumes Power of Dictatorship". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 31, 1932. p. 14.
  46. ^ "Frank Lloyd Wright Tells Life and Love". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 26, 1932. p. 1.
  47. ^ Gunnell, John (2003). Standard Catalog of Light-Duty Ford Trucks 1905–2002. Krause Publications. p. 55. ISBN 978-0-87349-411-3.