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List of performances by Margot Fonteyn

Fonteyn performing in a colour broadcast of The Sleeping Beauty, Producers Showcase, 1956

Dame Margot Fonteyn, DBE (18 May 1919 – 21 February 1991), stage name of Margaret Evelyn de Arias, was an English ballerina. She spent her entire career as a dancer with the Royal Ballet, eventually being appointed Prima Ballerina Assoluta of the company by Queen Elizabeth. She joined the Vic-Wells Ballet School at the age of 14 and from 1935 was the prima ballerina of the company, which would later be called the Sadler's Wells Ballet and the Royal Ballet. In 1959, though still tied to the Royal Ballet, she was allowed to perform as a freelance dancer to enable her work as a guest dancer with various international companies. Though she officially retired in 1979, she occasionally appeared as a dancer through the late-1980s.[1]

StageEdit

Unless otherwise stated, performances occurred at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden, London. The list is incomplete.

1930sEdit

Year Title Version Role Notes
1934 The Nutcracker choreography by Marius Petipa, music by Tchaikovsky Snowflake debut performance with the Vic-Wells Ballet[2]
1934[2] The Haunted Ballroom choreography by Ninette de Valois, music by Geoffrey Toye Young Tregennis first solo role[2]
1934[2] Les Sylphides choreography Michel Fokine, music by Frédéric Chopin[3] Mazurka
1934[2] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky cignet
1934[2] The Lord of Burleigh choreography by Sir Frederick Ashton, music by Felix Mendelssohn Lolly Willowes
1934[2] Rio Grande choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Constant Lambert Creole Girl
1935[2] Les Rendezvous choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Daniel Auber / arranged by Constant Lambert female lead first leading role[2]
1935[2] The Haunted Ballroom choreography by Ninette de Valois, music by Geoffrey Toye Alicia
1935[4] Façade choreography Frederick Ashton, music by William Walton Polka dancer and Tango dancer
1935[4] Le Baiser de la Fée choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Igor Stravinsky Young Bride role created for her by Ashton[4]
1935[4] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette Odile was danced by Ruth French.[4]
1936[4] Apparitions choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt / arranged by Constant Lambert Woman in the ball gown
1936[4] Nocturne choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Frederick Delius Flower girl Fonteyn was the first to dance the role in the ballet's debut performance.[4]
1936[4] The Nutcracker by Tchaikovsky Sugar Plum Fairy
1937[4] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam[5] Giselle
1937[4] Les Patineurs choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Giacomo Meyerbeer female role, pas de deux (with Helpmann)
1937[4] A Wedding Bouquet choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Lord Berners Julia
1937[4] Carnaval choreography by Michel Fokine, music by Robert Schumann Columbine
1937[4] Pomona choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Constant Lambert Pomona
1938[4] Horoscope choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Constant Lambert
1938[6] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile First performance of the dual role of Odette and Odile[6]
1938[6] The Judgement of Paris choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Lennox Berkeley Venus
1939[6] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora 2 February performance was a gala to benefit the Housing Centre; 22 March performance was a command performance for the French president.[6] Sadler's Wells Ballet billed the performance as The Sleeping Princess.[7]

1940sEdit

Year Title Version Role Notes
1940[7] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora Sadler's Wells Ballet billed the performance as The Sleeping Princess.[7]
1940[6] Dante Sonata choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt leader of the Children of Light Fonteyn was the first to dance the role in the ballet's debut performance.[6]
1940[6] The Wise Virgins choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Johann Sebastian Bach Bride Fonteyn was the first to dance the role in the ballet's debut performance.[6]
1941[8] The Wanderer choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Schubert Success Fonteyn was the first to dance the role in the ballet's debut performance.[8]
1941[8] Orpheus and Eurydice choreography by Ninette de Valois, music by Christoph Willibald Gluck Love Fonteyn was the first to dance the role in the ballet's debut performance.[8]
1941[9] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora Sadler's Wells Ballet billed the performance as The Sleeping Princess.[9]
1942[8] Comus choreography by Robert Helpmann, music by Henry Purcell / arranged by Constant Lambert Lady Helpmann's first ballet and Fonteyn created the role of "Lady" in the ballet's debut.[8]
1942[8] Hamlet choreography by Robert Helpmann, music by Tchaikovsky Ophelia Helpmann's second ballet[8] in which Fonteyn created the role at its world premier.[10]
1942[8] The Rake's Progress choreography by Ninette de Valois, music by Gavin Gordon Betrayed Girl
1943[8] Coppélia choreography Marius Petipa (as revised by Enrico Cecchetti, Lev Ivanov, and Nicholas Sergeyev), music by Léo Delibes[11] Swanilda[8]
1943[8] The Quest choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by William Walton Una Fonteyn was the first to dance the role in the ballet's debut performance.[8]
1943[12] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile Sadler's Wells billed the ballet as Le Lac des cygnes.[12]
1944[8] Le Spectre de la rose choreography Michel Fokine, music by Carl Maria von Weber female role, pas de deux
1944[8] Carnaval choreography by Michel Fokine, music by Robert Schumann Columbine Following this performance, the company spent the next year traveling with the Entertainments National Service Association (ENSA) performing in Belgium and France.[8]
1946[13] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora Reopening performance of the Royal Opera House after the end of World War II.[13]
1946[13] Nocturne choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Frederick Delius Flower girl The ballet was performed on 18 March, 10 April, 15 May and 19 November 1946.[14]
1946[15] The Rake's Progress choreography by Ninette de Valois, music by Gavin Gordon Betrayed Girl
1946[16] Dante Sonata choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt leader of the Children of Light
1946[13] Symphonic Variations choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by César Franck female lead The ballet was performed on 24 April (world premier), 3 June and 30 October 1946.[17]
1946[18] Les Sylphides choreography Michel Fokine, music by Frédéric Chopin Mazurka, Nocturne and pas de deux with Alexis Rassine[18]
1946[10] Hamlet choreography by Robert Helpmann, music by Tchaikovsky Ophelia Performances occurred on 3 June, 29 October, 30 October and 12 November 1946[10]
1946[13] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam[5] Giselle The ballet was performed on 12 June, 7 November and 18 November 1946.[5]
1946[13] Coppélia choreography Marius Petipa (as revised by Enrico Cecchetti, Lev Ivanov, and Nicholas Sergeyev), music by Léo Delibes[11] Swanilda[11]
1946[13] Les Sirènes choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Lord Berners La Bolero Fonteyn was the first to dance the role in the ballet's debut performance.[19]
1946[13] The Fairy Queen choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Henry Purcell Spirit of the Air
1946[13] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile
1947[13] The Three-Cornered Hat choreography by Léonide Massine, music by Manuel de Falla Miller's Wife The ballet was performed on 6 February, 8 February, 20 December and 22 December 1947.[20]
1947[16] Dante Sonata choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt leader of the Children of Light Performances occurred on 8 February and 22 December 1947.[16]
1947[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam[5] Giselle
1947[12] Swan Lake, Act II by Tchaikovsky Odette
1947[10] Hamlet choreography by Robert Helpmann, music by Tchaikovsky Ophelia The ballet was performed on 27 February, 14 November, 15 November, and 18 November 1947.[10]
1947[21] Mam'zelle Angot choreography by Léonide Massine, music by Charles Lecocq / arranged by Gordon Jacob Mam'zelle Angot The Royal Opera House debut of the work premiered on 26 November, with a subsequent performance by Fonteyn on 8 December, 1947[22]
1947[23] Symphonic Variations choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by César Franck female lead
1948[21] Scènes de ballet choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Igor Stravinsky female lead
1948[12] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile
1948[21] Les Demoiselles de la Nuit choreography Roland Petit, music by Jean Françaix Agathe The role was created by Petit for Fonteyn[1]
1948[21] Don Juan choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Richard Strauss La Morte Amoureuse The premier performance of the ballet in which Fonteyn danced occurred on 25 November, but she injured herself during the performance and could not dance for several months afterward.[21]
1949[21] Cinderella choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Sergei Prokofiev Cinderella Fonteyn opened in Cinderella on 25 February and after completing touring, resumed the role for the 26 December 1949 performance.[21]
1949[23] Symphonic Variations choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by César Franck female lead Fonteyn played the role on 9 March and 1 August 1949[23]
1949[21] Symphonic Variations choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by César Franck female lead In May 1949, the company participated in the May Festival at the Teatro Communale in Florence, Italy. Among the repertoire presented were Checkmate, Cinderella, Hamlet, Symphonic Variations and The Rake's Progress.[24]
1949[21] Swan Lake[25] by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile After the performance in Italy, Fonteyn and Helpmann appeared in Copenhagen at a Gala event attended by Frederick IX of Denmark.[21]
1949[26] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora From October to December 1949 the company was touring the United States. After the premier on 9 October, the ballet toured Washington, D. C.; Richmond, Virginia; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Chicago, Illinois; East Lansing, Michigan; and Toronto, Ontario, Canada.[26]

1950sEdit

Year Title Version Role Notes
1950[26] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora
1950[26] Don Quixote choreography Ninette de Valois, music by Roberto Gerhard Lady Dulcinea-Aldonza Lorenzo Fonteyn was the first to dance the dual role in the ballet's debut performance on 20 February 1950. She subsequently danced the role on 4 March and 13 March 1950.[27]
1950[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam[5] Giselle
1950[26] Symphonic Variations choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by César Franck female lead Gala performance on 9 March in honor of French President Vincent Auriol.[26]
1950[26] The Sleeping Beauty, Act III by Tchaikovsky Aurora Gala performance on 9 March in honor of French President Vincent Auriol.[26]
1950[12] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile
1950[26] Ballet Imperial choreography by George Balanchine, music by Tchaikovsky lead female Premier performance of the ballet with the Royal Ballet Company was on 5 April 1950. Fonteyn subsequently performed the role on 25 May and 30 May 1950.[28]
1950[29] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora Partnered with Helpmann, the pair danced at La Scala in Milan, Italy on 24 April.[29]
1950[29] The Haunted Ballroom choreography by Ninette de Valois, music by Geoffrey Toye Young Tregennis Role reprised for the 20th anniversary of the company.[29]
1950[29] L'Ile des Sirènes choreography by Alfred Rodrigues, music by Claude Debussy female lead Fonteyn played this role in a provincial tour.[29]
1950[12] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile Second U.S. tour began in September 1950 and opened with a pax de deux by Fonteyn and Michael Somes in New York City.[30]
1950[31] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora Partnered with Helpmann the duo performed in San Francisco, California on 11 November.[31]
1951[23] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora Opened the season on 21 February. Besides the opening night, Fonteyn danced the role on 24 February, 1 March, 3 March, 6 March, 8 March and 10 March 1951.[23]
1951[32] Cinderella choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Sergei Prokofiev Cinderella Fonteyn danced the season opener on 12 March 1951 and subsequent performances on 14 March, 17 March and 21 March 1951.[32]
1951[12] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile Fonteyn first danced the dual role 26 March 1951 for the season and repeated the performance on 28 March, 31 March, 23 April, 25 April, and 12 May 1951.[12]
1951[29] Daphnis and Chloe choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Maurice Ravel Chloë Fonteyn danced in the world premier on 5 April 1951. She subsequently performed the role on 6 April, 7 April, 9 April, 10 April, 11 April, 16 April, 18 April, 28 April, 3 May, 8 May, 9 May, 4 July, 6 July, 12 July, 13 July, and 14 July 1951.[33]
1951[17] Symphonic Variations choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by César Franck female lead In the 1951 season, Fonteyn first danced the role on 28 April and also performed it on 2 May, 11 May, and 3 July 1951.[17]
1951[29] Tiresias choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Constant Lambert female Tiresias Fonteyn danced in the world premier on 9 July 1951. She subsequently performed the role on 10 July, 11 July and each day from 16-20 July 1951.[34] After this performance, she injured her foot and was unable to dance for several months.[35]
1952[36] Daphnis and Chloe choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Maurice Ravel Chloë Her first performance after the injury was on 9 February 1952.[36]
1952[37] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile Performed at the San Carlos Theatre in Lisbon, Portugal from 15 to 23 April 1952.[37] After the performance in Lisbon, the company performed in Oporto, Portugal.[38]
1952[39] Sylvia choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Léo Delibes Sylvia Fonteyn danced in the world premier on 3 September 1952.[40]
1952[41] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam[5] Giselle Danced with Somes in Berlin at the Berlin Festival on 29 September.[41] Beginning a provincial tour throughout England, after Berlin, she contracted diphtheria in Southampton and was unable to dance for five months.[38]
1953[38] Apparitions choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt / arranged by Constant Lambert Woman in the ball gown After her performance, Fonteyn, gave a rare curtain speech.[38] Because she had been ill, she performed one-act ballets through much of the first half of the 1953 season.[42]
1953[12] Swan Lake, Act II by Tchaikovsky Odette Fonteyn appeared on 30 March and 2 June 1953.[12]
1953[34] Tiresias choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Constant Lambert female Tiresias Fonteyn danced on 17 April and 1 September 1953.[34]
1953[38] Homage to the Queen choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Malcolm Arnold Queen of the Air World premier in honor of Queen Elizabeth II's coronation, danced 2 June 1953.[38]
1953[32] Cinderella choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Sergei Prokofiev Cinderella
1953[40] Sylvia, Act III choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Léo Delibes Sylvia
1953[43] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile Third U.S. tour began with a performance in New York City on 13 September.[43] The tour lasted 19 weeks and included 4 Canadian cities and 20 cities in the U.S.[44]
1953[43] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora Performed in New York City on 16 September.[43]
1954[45] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora
1954[33] Daphnis and Chloe choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Maurice Ravel Chloë For the 1954 season, Fonteyn danced the role on 9 March and 14 September.[33]
1954[46] Homage to the Queen choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Malcolm Arnold Queen of the Air Fonteyn danced the role on 9 March, 26 March, 21 April, and 3 September 1954.[46]
1954[12] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile
1954[40] Sylvia choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Léo Delibes Sylvia
1954[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam[5] Giselle
1954[17] Symphonic Variations choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by César Franck female lead
1954[47] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile Somes and Fonteyn danced in June at the Yugoslav National Ballet in Belgrade.[47]
1954[48] Entrada de Madame Butterfly choreography Frederick Ashton, music Arthur Sullivan / arranged by Robert Irving Madame Butterfly Costumes were designed by Christian Dior.[49] The ballet was debuted in Granada, Spain at the Jardines del Generalife.[48]
1954[50] The Firebird choreography by Michel Fokine, music by Igor Stravinsky The Firebird Fonteyn was taught the role by Tamara Karsavina and danced with Somes. The first performance was held in Edinburgh at the Empire Theatre on 23 August.[50] Fonteyn repeated the role on 28 August, 31 August, 14 September and 16 December 1954.[51]
1955[50] The Firebird choreography by Michel Fokine, music by Igor Stravinsky The Firebird Performed by Fonteyn on 20 January and 22 March 1955.[51]
1955[52] Daphnis and Chloe choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Maurice Ravel Chloë Performed in Paris with Somes the night before her wedding on 5 February 1955.[52]
1955[17] Symphonic Variations choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by César Franck female lead Fonteyn danced on 19 March and 31 August 1955.[17] The first performance was her first performance after her marriage to Roberto Arias.[52]
1955[40] Sylvia choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Léo Delibes Sylvia Fonteyn danced the role on 12 April and 23 August 1955.[40]
1955[18] Les Sylphides choreography Michel Fokine, music by Frédéric Chopin Mazurka, Nocturne and pas de deux with Alexis Rassine[18] Fonteyn's performances were on 3 June and 25 August 1955.[18]
1955[50] The Firebird choreography by Michel Fokine, music by Igor Stravinsky The Firebird Performed by Fonteyn and Somes on Christmas Day at La Scala in Milan.[53]
1955[53] Daphnis and Chloe choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Maurice Ravel Chloë New Year's Eve performance.[33]
1956[12] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile After the performance on 2 January 1956, Fonteyn received notification of her appointment a Dame in the Order of the British Empire.[53]
1956[32] Cinderella choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Sergei Prokofiev Cinderella Fonteyn performed the role on 7 January and 21 November 1956.[32]
1956[49] La Péri choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Paul Dukas female lead Fonteyn was the first to dance the role in the ballet's debut performance on 15 February 1956.[49]
1956[23] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora Fonteyn performed the role on 20 February and 21 December 1956.[23]
1956[51] The Firebird choreography by Michel Fokine, music by Igor Stravinsky The Firebird
1956[49] Entrée japonaise choreography Frederick Ashton, music Arthur Sullivan / arranged by Robert Irving Madame Butterfly Costumes were designed by Christian Dior. The ballet was previously known as Entrada de Madame Butterfly.[48]
1956[49] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile Performed by Fonteyn and Somes in Helsinki with the Finnish National Ballet on 15 April 1956.[49]
1956[49] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora Performed by Fonteyn in Helsinki with the Finnish National Ballet on 12 April 1956.[49]
1956[49] Swan Lake, Act II by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile Performed by Fonteyn and Somes as guest dancers at the wedding of Grace Kelly and Prince Rainier III in Monte Carlo, Monaco.[49]
1956[49] Façade choreography Frederick Ashton, music by William Walton Tango dancer Performed with Robert Helpmann in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Sadler's Wells Ballet Company, 5 May 1956.[49]
1956[49] Birthday Offering choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Alexander Glazunov / arranged by Robert Irving female lead Fonteyn danced in the world premier of the ballet written to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Sadler's Wells Ballet Company.[49] Subsequently, she danced the role on 7 September and 29 September 1956.[54]
1956[12] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile
1956[49] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile Performed in Johannesburg, South Africa at Zoo Lake.[49]
1956[40] Sylvia choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Léo Delibes Sylvia
1957[33] Daphnis and Chloe choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Maurice Ravel Chloë Fonteyn's first performance after the company receives a royal charter to become the Royal Ballet.[55] Fonteyn performs the role on 12 March and 10 April 1957.[33]
1957[55] Petrushka choreography by Michel Fokine, music by Igor Stravinsky Doll Ballerina Fonteyn dances in the company premier of the ballet on 26 March 1957 and repeats the performance two days later.[56]
1957[57] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile Performed at The Empire Theatre in Sydney, Australia in May 1957, where she danced for two weeks performing in every show.[55]
1957[58] La Péri choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Paul Dukas female lead After the August performance, Fonteyn embarked on a 5-month international tour.[55]
1958[40] Sylvia choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Léo Delibes Sylvia
1958[58] La Péri choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Paul Dukas female lead Fonteyn danced the role on 22 February, 6 March, and 27 March 1958.[58]
1958[33] Daphnis and Chloe choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Maurice Ravel Chloë Fonteyn's performances were on 6 March, 14 March, and 20 August 1958.[33]
1958[23] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora Fonteyn danced the role for the 1958 season on 10 March and subsequently performed it on 18 August 1958.[23]
1958[12] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile Fonteyn's performances occurred on 17 March and 15 December 1958.[12]
1958[59] The Nutcracker, Act III choreography by Marius Petipa, music by Tchaikovsky female lead Pax de duex performed with Michael Somes for the Royal Ballet Gala on 27 March 1958.[59]
1958[46] Homage to the Queen choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Malcolm Arnold Queen of the Air
1958[18] Les Sylphides choreography Michel Fokine, music by Frédéric Chopin Mazurka, Nocturne and pas de deux with David Blair[18] Blair and Fonteyn danced on 8 May and 3 June 1958.[18]
1958[54] Birthday Offering choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Alexander Glazunov / arranged by Robert Irving female lead
1958[60] Ondine choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Hans Werner Henze Ondine The world premier of the ballet occurred on 27 October 1958 with Fonteyn creating the title role. Subsequently, she performed it on 30 October, 1 November, 5 November, 7 November, 11 November, 25 November, 6 December, 9 December, 17 December, and 31 December 1958.[60]
1958[32] Cinderella choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Sergei Prokofiev Cinderella
1959[60] Ondine choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Hans Werner Henze Ondine Fonteyn performed the role on 24 January, 26 January, 3 February, 9 February, 11 February, 14 February, 4 September, 5 September, 10 September, 10 September, 7 November, 19 November, 30 November, 3 December, 12 December, and 18 December 1959.[60]
1959[17] Symphonic Variations choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by César Franck female lead Fonteyn danced the role on 5 June and 21 November 1959.[17]
1959[33] Daphnis and Chloe choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Maurice Ravel Chloë On 5 June and 21 November 1959 Fonteyn danced the role.[33]
1959[32] Cinderella choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Sergei Prokofiev Cinderella

1960sEdit

Year Title Version Role Notes
1960[60] Ondine choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Hans Werner Henze Ondine Fonteyn performed the role on 5 January, 18 January, 26 January, 1 February, 14 March, 19 March, 2 April, 6 April, 25 April, 9 May 1960.[60]
1960[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam[5] Giselle
1960[61] Raymonda 'Scène d'amour' choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Alexander Glazunov Raymonda Fonteyn and Somes danced at the first performance of the ballet at the Royal Opera House on 1 March 1960.[61]
1960[18] Les Sylphides choreography Michel Fokine, music by Frédéric Chopin Mazurka, Nocturne and pas de deux with David Blair[18] Blair and Fonteyn danced on 15 August and 17 August 1960.[18]
1960[54] Birthday Offering choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Alexander Glazunov / arranged by Robert Irving female lead Fonteyn performed on 15 August and 17 August 1960.[54]
1960[32] Cinderella choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Sergei Prokofiev Cinderella
1961[60] Ondine choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Hans Werner Henze Ondine Fonteyn performed the role on 2 March, 10 March, 16 March, 24 March, 3 October 1961.[60]
1961[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam[5] Giselle On 4 April and 23 September 1961, Fonteyn danced the role.[5]
1961[17] Symphonic Variations choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by César Franck female lead
1961[33] Daphnis and Chloe choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Maurice Ravel Chloë
1961[23] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora Fonteyn danced the role for the 1958 season on 8 November and subsequently performed it on 27 November, 1 December, 9 December, 18 December 1961.[23]
1962[32] Cinderella choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Sergei Prokofiev Cinderella
1962[51] The Firebird choreography by Michel Fokine, music by Igor Stravinsky The Firebird Fonteyn's performances occurred on 1 February, 13 February, 26 February 1962.[51]
1962[12] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile
1962[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam[5] Giselle The debut of the legendary partnership with Rudolf Nureyev occurred on 21 February[62] and subsequently Fonteyn danced the role on 1 March, 6 March, 15 June, 29 June 1962.[5]
1962[23] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora After this 23 March 1962 performance,[23] Fonteyn went on tour in Australia.[63]
1962[63] Le Spectre de la rose choreography Michel Fokine, music by Carl Maria von Weber female role, pas de deux Fonteyn danced with Brian Shaw during the Australian tour. [63]
1962[63] Symphonic Variations choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by César Franck female lead Fonteyn performed in May during the Australian tour.[63]
1962[63] Birthday Offering choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Alexander Glazunov / arranged by Robert Irving female lead Fonteyn performed the dance during the May 1962 Australian tour.[63]
1962[63] Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky Odette-Odile Swan Lake pas de deux with David Blair in Australia.[63]
1962[63] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora Fonteyn was partnered with David Blair during the May Australian tour.[63]
1962[33] Daphnis and Chloe choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Maurice Ravel Chloë Fonteyn performed the role on 3 November, 5 November, 6 November, 16 November 1962.[33]
1962[64] Le Corsaire Pas de Deux choreography Marius Petipa, music by Adolphe Adam revised by Cesare Pugni, Léo Delibes, Riccardo Drigo and Petr Oldenbourg female dancer The dance was first performed at the Royal Opera House by Fonteyn and Nureyev on 3 November and subsequently performed by the duo on 5 November and 16 November 1962.[64]
1962[18] Les Sylphides choreography Michel Fokine, music by Frédéric Chopin Nocturne, Prelude and pas de deux with Nureyev[18]
1962[60] Ondine choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Hans Werner Henze Ondine
1963[64] Le Corsaire Pas de Deux choreography Marius Petipa, music by Adolphe Adam revised by Cesare Pugni, Léo Delibes, Riccardo Drigo and Petr Oldenbourg female dancer Fonteyn performed the female part on 31 January, 16 March, 22 March, 28 March, 3 April 1963.[64]
1963[18] Les Sylphides choreography Michel Fokine, music by Frédéric Chopin Nocturne, Prelude and pas de deux with Nureyev[18] Fonteyn danced the role on 31 January and subsequently repeated the performance on 16 March and 22 March 1963.[18]
1963[12] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile The original production was performed in the first part of the season. Nureyev's revised choreography was danced from 12 December 1963 to the end of the season. Fonteyn's performances occurred on 7 February, 12 February, 12 December, 14 December, 30 December 1963.[12]
1963[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam Giselle Fonteyn danced the role on 20 February, 26 February, 2 November, 15 November 1963.[5]
1963[65] Marguerite and Armand choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt Marguerite The world premier of the ballet, written for Fonteyn and Nureyev occurred on 12 March.[1][65] Subsequently, they performed it on 15 March, 19 March, 21 March, 20 November, 22 November, 25 November 1963.[65]
1963[17] Symphonic Variations choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by César Franck female lead Fonteyn danced the lead on 30 March and 1 April 1963.[17]
1963[66] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora Fonteyn danced the pax de deux with David Blair on opening night of the U.S. tour in April 1963 at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City.[66]
1963[66] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam Giselle Fonteyn and Nureyev premiered on 25 April 1963 at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City.[66]
1963[67] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile Fonteyn and Nureyev danced on 29 April 1963 at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City.[67]
1963[67] Le Corsaire Pas de Deux choreography Marius Petipa, music by Adolphe Adam revised by Cesare Pugni, Léo Delibes, Riccardo Drigo and Petr Oldenbourg female dancer Fonteyn and Nureyev danced in April 1963 during the U.S. tour in New York City at the Metropolitan Opera House.[67] After New York, they went on to play in Toronto.[68]
1963[68] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam Giselle Fonteyn danced with Nureyev in July 1963 in Los Angeles, California.[68]
1963[68] Marguerite and Armand choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt Marguerite The U.S. tour ended in Los Angeles with Fonteyn and Nureyev performing in July 1963.[68] After the U.S. tour the Fonteyn Follies, including Nureyev, Erik Bruhn and Carla Fracci, among others, toured Athens, Nice, Tele Aviv, Haifa, Jerusalem, Nagoya, Kyoto, Osaka and Honolulu, before returning to England.[69]
1963[70] La Bayadère choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Leon Minkus Nikiya The world premier of this version as revised by Nureyev was performed on 27 November and the duo repeated their dance on 30 November, 6 December, 7 December 1963.[70]
1964[12] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile Fonteyn performed the role on 3 January, 3 March, 6 March, 10 March, 12 March, 19 March, 5 November, 11 November 1964.[12]
1964[60] Ondine choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Hans Werner Henze Ondine Valentine's Day performance.[60]
1964[65] Marguerite and Armand choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt Marguerite Fonteyn and Nureyev performed the ballet on 14 March and 17 March 1964.[65] They also danced it several times in June, after she returned from Panama.[71]
1964[70] La Bayadère choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Leon Minkus Nikiya Fonteyn danced the role on 8 April[70] and subsequently performed it in June[71] and then on 3 December and 5 December 1964.[70]
1964[72] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam Giselle Fonteyn performed the role with Nureyev on tour Sydney with The Australian Ballet in April 1964[72] and they danced in Melbourne in May.[73]
1964[72] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile Fonteyn performed the role with Nureyev on tour in Sydney with The Australian Ballet in April 1964[72] and in Melbourne in May. From Australia, the tour continued in Stuttgart.[74]
1964[75] Divertimento choreography Sir Kenneth MacMillan, music by Béla Bartók female dancer MacMillian created the ballet for Fonteyn and Nureyev. They danced in the premier at the Bath Festival and then flew to Panama because her husband had been injured in an assassination attempt.[75]
1964[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam Giselle Fonteyn's performances in the role occurred in June[71] and she repeated the dance on 23 October, 28 October, 27 November 1964.[5]
1964[76] Raymonda choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Alexander Glazunov Raymonda Due to her husband's relapse, though Fonteyn had trained for the role, she missed all the July performances at the Festival dei Due Mondi except the final performance.[77]
1964[12] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile Fonteyn and Nureyev opened at the Vienna State Opera House on 15 October with his version of the ballet receiving a record-breaking eighty-nine curtain calls.[78]
1964[33] Daphnis and Chloe choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Maurice Ravel Chloë Fonteyn danced the role on 24 November, 25 November, 30 November, and 15 December 1964.[33]
1964[64] Le Corsaire Pas de Deux choreography Marius Petipa, music by Adolphe Adam revised by Cesare Pugni, Léo Delibes, Riccardo Drigo and Petr Oldenbourg female dancer Fonteyn's performances were on 24 November, 25 November, 30 November 1964.[64]
1964[23] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora
1965[23] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky Aurora
1965[65] Marguerite and Armand choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt Marguerite Fonteyn and Nureyev performed the ballet on 12 January, 14 January, 15 January, 20 March, 22 March 1965.[65]
1965[79] Le Corsaire Pas de Deux choreography Marius Petipa, music by Adolphe Adam revised by Cesare Pugni, Léo Delibes, Riccardo Drigo and Petr Oldenbourg female dancer Fonteyn and Nureyev performed on 20 January 1965 at the presidential inauguration of Lyndon B. Johnson at the National Mall in Washington, D. C.[79]
1965[12] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile
1965[70] La Bayadère choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Leon Minkus Nikiya Fonteyn danced the role on 4 February, 10 March, 12 March 1965.[70]
1965[80] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet Fonteyn and Nureyev danced in the world premier of the ballet on 9 February 1965[80] at the insistence of the Royal Opera management.[1] MacMillan had actually written the part with Lynn Seymour and Christopher Gable slated as the leads.[81] Fonteyn and Nureyev subsequently danced the roles on 9 February, 11 February, 25 February, 5 March 1965.[80]
1965[54] Birthday Offering choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Alexander Glazunov / arranged by Robert Irving female lead
1965[82] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet Fonteyn and Nureyev first performed the ballet in New York City on 21 April 1965.[82]
1965[83] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam Giselle During the three-month U.S. tour, Fonteyn and Nureyev danced the ballet in Washington, D. C. at the Coliseum.[83]
1965[40] Sylvia choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Léo Delibes Sylvia
1965[84] Raymonda choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Alexander Glazunov Raymonda In November 1965, Fonteyn and Nureyev toured with The Australian Ballet for eight weeks going from Birmingham to London, Paris, Copenhagen, Los Angeles and Honolulu.[84]
1965[32] Cinderella choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Sergei Prokofiev Cinderella
1966[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam Giselle Fonteyn performed the role on 13 January, 18 January, 27 January, 28 February, 3 March, and 23 December 1966.[5]
1966[12] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile Fonteyn danced the role on 3 February and subsequently performed it on 8 February, 14 February, 16 March, and 18 March 1966.[12]
1966[80] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet The role was performed by Fonteyn on 22 February, 9 March, 12 March, 6 June, 7 June 1966.[80]
1966[76] Raymonda, Act III choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Alexander Glazunov Raymonda
1966[33] Daphnis and Chloe choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Maurice Ravel Chloë Fonteyn performed the role on 25 June, 28 June, 29 June, 1 July 1966.[33]
1966[85] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet During the summer break at the Royal Opera House, Fonteyn and Nureyev performed in Monaco at the Royal Palace, afterward dining with the royal couple, Princess Grace and Prince Rainier. The company moved on from Monaco to performances in Greece.[85]
1966[60] Ondine choreography Frederick Ashton, with music by Hans Werner Henze Ondine
1966[32] Cinderella choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Sergei Prokofiev Cinderella
1967[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam Giselle Fonteyn performed the role on 10 January and 17 January 1967.[5]
1967[70] La Bayadère choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Leon Minkus Nikiya Fonteyn danced on 25 January and 26 January 1967.[70]
1967[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam Giselle
1967[80] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet Performed by Fonteyn on 11 February and 14 February 1967.[80]
1967[86] Paradise Lost choreography by Roland Petit, music by Marius Constant The Woman (Eve) Fonteyn and Nureyev danced as leads in the world premier of the avant-garde ballet on 23 February 1967.[86] The ballet, about the fall of man, was based on a work by French poet, Jean Cau and featured modern dance, pop art and neon lighting.[87] The duo subsequently performed the roles on 7 March, 10 March, 16 March, 21 March, and 8 April 1967.[86]
1967[12] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile Fonteyn's performances were on 4 March and 15 March 1967.[12]
1967[65] Marguerite and Armand choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt Marguerite Fonteyn and Nureyev performed on 25 March, 27 March, 29 March, and 30 March 1967.[65]
1967[88] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet Danced by Fonteyn and Nureyev in May 1967 at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City.[88]
1967[88] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam Giselle Fonteyn and Nureyev performed the dance during the US tour in May 1967 in New York City.[88]
1967[89] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile Fonteyn and Nureyev ended the New York City performance on Fonteyn's 48th birthday with the ballet, which received an ovation that lasted over forty minutes.[89]
1967[90] Paradise Lost choreography by Roland Petit, music by Marius Constant The Woman (Eve) In July 1967, Fonteyn and Nureyev performed the ballet in San Francisco during their U.S. tour.[90] They also subsequently danced the ballet in Los Angeles at the Hollywood Bowl.[88]
1967[88] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet Performed by Fonteyn and Nureyev at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles in July 1967.[88]
1967[91] Paradise Lost choreography by Roland Petit, music by Marius Constant The Woman (Eve) Fonteyn and Nureyev danced the ballet at the Paris Opera in October 1967.[91]
1968[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam Giselle
1968[12] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Fonteyn's appearances occurred on 12 February, 14 February, 25 March, and 8 April 1968.[12]
1968[80] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet Fonteyn danced the role on 20 February and 22 February 1968.[80]
1968[65] Marguerite and Armand choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt Marguerite Fonteyn and Nureyev danced the roles on 15 March, 19 March, and 29 March 1968.[65]
1968[18] Les Sylphides choreography Michel Fokine, music by Frédéric Chopin Nocturne, Prelude and pas de deux with Nureyev[18] Fonteyn's performances occurred on 15 March, 19 March, 3 April, and 9 April 1968.[18]
1968[54] Birthday Offering choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Alexander Glazunov / arranged by Robert Irving female lead Dances by Fonteyn were performed on 29 March, 3 April, and 9 April 1968.[54]
1968[92] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet Fonteyn and Nureyev opened the spring season 1968 in New York City with the ballet.[92]
1968[70] La Bayadère choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Leon Minkus Nikiya
1969[80] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet Performed by Fonteyn on 29 January, 5 February, 7 February, 15 February, 20 February, 21 November, 25 November 1969.[80]
1969[12] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile Fonteyn danced on 10 February and subsequently presented the role on 26 February, 27 November, 3 December 1969.[12]
1969[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam Giselle Fonteyn appeared in the role on 7 March, 10 March, and 15 March 1969.[5]
1969[93] Pelléas and Mélisande choreography Roland Petit, music by Arnold Schoenberg Mélisande Fonteyn and Nureyev performed in the world premier of the ballet on 26 March 1969. The duo subsequently performed the ballet on 27 March and 29 March 1969.[93]
1969[23] The Sleeping Beauty choreography revised by Frederick Ashton, music by Tchaikovsky Aurora Performed by Fonteyn on 25 September, 29 September, and 23 October 1969.[23]
1969[70] La Bayadère choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Leon Minkus Nikiya Fonteyn danced in performances on 24 October and 25 October 1969.[70]

1970s and 1980sEdit

Year Title Version Role Notes
1970[5] Giselle choreography Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, as revised by Marius Petipa; music by Adolphe Adam Giselle Fonteyn performed the role on 8 January, 12 January, 28 February, and 20 June 1970.[5]
1970[76] Raymonda, Act III choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Alexander Glazunov Raymonda Fonteyn danced on 16 January and repeated the role on 19 January and 29 January, 1970.[76]
1970[65] Marguerite and Armand choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt Marguerite Fonteyn and Nureyev performed the ballet on 9 February, 17 February, 18 February, 25 February, 22 June, 23 June, 23 July, and 24 July 1970.[65]
1970[12] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile Fonteyn's performances occurred on 14 February, 6 July, and 13 July 1970.[12]
1970[64] Le Corsaire Pas de Deux choreography Marius Petipa, music by Adolphe Adam revised by Cesare Pugni, Léo Delibes, Riccardo Drigo and Petr Oldenbourg female dancer Fonteyn danced on 17 February, 18 February, and 25 February 1970.[64]
1970[94] Tribute to Sir Frederick Ashton varied ballets various Fonteyn danced excerpts of The Wise Virgins, Nocturne, Apparitions and Daphnis and Chloe in the tribute held on 24 July 1970.[94]
1970[80] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet Fonteyn performed on 10 December and 12 December 1970.[80]
1970[70] La Bayadère choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Leon Minkus Nikiya
1971[70] La Bayadère choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Leon Minkus Nikiya Fonteyn performed the role on 13 January and 21 January 1971.[70]
1971[12] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile Fonteyn danced on 1 June and 5 June 1971.[12]
1971[65] Marguerite and Armand choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt Marguerite Fonteyn and Nureyev danced the role on 23 June and repeated their performance on 25 June, 6 July, 14 July, 16 December, 18 December 1971.[65]
1971[80] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet Fonteyn and Nureyev performed an excerpt of the balcony scene on 14 December 1971.[80]
1972[12] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile Fonteyn danced on 6 January and 10 January 1972.[12]
1972[65] Marguerite and Armand choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt Marguerite
1972[80] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet Fonteyn performed the role on 10 February and subsequently danced on 12 February, 19 July, and 20 July 1972.[80]
1972[95] Poème de l'extase choreography by John Cranko, music by Alexander Scriabin The Diva Fonteyn appeared in the Royal Opera House debut of the ballet on 15 February 1972 and repeated the performance on 18 February, 21 February, 24 February, 8 April, and 17 April 1972.[95]
1972[23] The Sleeping Beauty choreography revised by Frederick Ashton, music by Tchaikovsky Aurora Fonteyn's performances occurred on 16 March, 18 March, 22 July, and 24 July 1972.[23]
1972[76] Raymonda, Act III choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Alexander Glazunov Raymonda Fonteyn danced the role on 8 April, 17 April, and 9 November 1972.[76]
1972[54] Birthday Offering choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Alexander Glazunov / arranged by Robert Irving female lead After the performance on 15 November 1972,[54] Fonteyn went into semi-retirement primarily performing only excerpts of ballets or one-act ballets.[96]
1973[12] Swan Lake choreography Rudolph Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky, arranged by John Lanchbery Odette-Odile Fonteyn performed the dual role on 11 January and 17 January 1973.[12]
1973[70] La Bayadère choreography Marius Petipa, revised by Rudolf Nureyev; music by Leon Minkus Nikiya Fonteyn danced the ballet on 20 January and 23 January 1973.[70]
1973[80] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet Fonteyn and Nureyev performed the ballet on 12 December and 15 December 1973.[80]
1973[65] Marguerite and Armand choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt Marguerite Danced by Fonteyn and Nureyev on 20 December and 21 December 1973.[65]
1974[23] The Sleeping Beauty, Pas de deux choreography revised by Frederick Ashton, music by Tchaikovsky female dancer Fonteyn and Nureyev danced the pas de deux on 17 July 1974.[23]
1975[94] Don Juan, Pas de deux choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Richard Strauss female dancer Fonteyn and Nureyev danced the pas de deux on 4 March 1975.[94]
1975[97] The Moor's Pavane choreography José Limón, music by Henry Purcell Desdemona Fonteyn danced the role in June with the Chicago Ballet and repeated the role with Nureyev at The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., in July 1975.[97]
1975[96] Marguerite and Armand choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt Marguerite Performed in New York City at the Uris Theatre in an engagement Fonteyn & Nureyev on Broadway which ran from 18-29 November 1975.[96][98]
1975[96] Floresta Amazonica choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Heitor Villa-Lobos[98] female dancer The pas de deux was created for Fonteyn by Ashton and performed by her and Nureyev in its US debut during November 1975 in Fonteyn & Nureyev on Broadway.[96]
1975[96] Le Corsaire Pas de Deux choreography Marius Petipa, music by Adolphe Adam revised by Cesare Pugni, Léo Delibes, Riccardo Drigo and Petr Oldenbourg female dancer Performed by Fonteyn and Nureyev in Fonteyn & Nureyev on Broadway in November 1975.[96]
1976[80] Romeo and Juliet choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, music by Sergei Prokofiev Juliet Performed by Fonteyn and Nureyev on 5 January, 6 January, and 10 January 1976.[80]
1976[99] Amazon Forest pas de deux choreography Frederick Ashton, music by Heitor Villa-Lobos female dancer Fonteyn danced with David Wall in the Royal Opera House Premier on 23 November 1976. The ballet had originally been titled Floresta Amazonica.[99]
1977[10] Hamlet, prelude choreography by Robert Helpmann, music by Tchaikovsky Ophelia Danced by Fonteyn on 30 May 1977.[10]
1979[100] Salut d'amour à Margot Fonteyn choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Edward Elgar female dancer Tribute written for Fonteyn by Ashton, the two who danced the roles, for her 60th birthday celebration.[100]
1979[1] Façade choreography Frederick Ashton, music by William Walton Tango dancer Performed with Robert Helpmann at her 60th birthday tribute.[1]
1979[1] Le Spectre de la rose choreography Michel Fokine, music by Carl Maria von Weber Girl Performed in the summer 1979 with Nureyev.[1]
1979[1] L'après-midi d'un faune choreography Vaslav Nijinsky, music by Claude Debussy lead nymph In June 1979, Nureyev persuaded Fonteyn to perform the role with the Festival Ballet in London with him.[101]
1984[102] Acte de présence choreography by Frederick Ashton, music by Tchaikovsky female dancer Dance written for Fonteyn and himself to perform in honor of Ashton's 80th birthday and the centennial celebrations for New York City's Metropolitan Opera House. The work debuted in New York City on 13 May 1984 and was presented at the Royal Opera House on 18 October 1984.[102]
1986[1] The Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky The Queen Fonteyn performed the role in Miami, Florida, with the Birmingham Royal Ballet in February 1986.[1]
1988[103][104] Baroque Pas de Trois female dancer Fonteyn's last performance which was danced with Nureyev and Carla Fracci on 16 September 1988 at the Maratona-Festa a Corte, in Mantua, Italy.[103][104]

Television and filmEdit

Date Title broadcaster/producer Role Notes
1937[105] test transmission[106] BBC as herself Fonteyn performed in Giselle with Robert Helpmann and Nocturne[105]
3 May 1937[107] The Vic-Wells Ballet Company: Les Patineurs BBC "white female" Fonteyn appeared in the company and in pas de deux with Helpmann in Les Patineurs.[107]
13 December 1937[108] The Vic-Wells Ballet Company: Le Lac des Cygnes, Act II BBC "Odette"
25 March 1939[109][110] The Sleeping Princess BBC "Aurora"
7 June 1946[13] Reopening of the Alexandra Palace BBC as herself
2 October 1947[21] The Little Ballerina General Film Distributors as herself
10 May 1949[21] Ballet Recital BBC as herself recital featuring pieces by Sir Frederick Ashton, performed by Fonteyn, Michael Somes and Harold Turner[111]
4 February 1951[112] Toast of the Town, The Ed Sullivan Show CBS as herself
24 January 1954 Toast of the Town, The Ed Sullivan Show CBS as herself Les Patineurs was performed in an abbreviated version, followed by Somes and Fonteyn dancing the pas de deux from Homage to the Queen.[44]
12 December 1955[113][114] Producers' Showcase NBC "Aurora" Live US television colour production of The Sleeping Beauty.[113][114] This production has been preserved on black-and-white kinescope, and released on DVD.[115]
26 May 1962[116] Margot Fonteyn Souvenier Program TCN Channel 9 various Fonteyn and David Blair danced the pas de deux from Sylvia and she danced in Birthday Offering and Tarantella.[117]
1963[118] An Evening with the Royal Ballet British Home Entertainment female lead Fonteyn and Nureyev were partnered in Le Corsaire Pas de Deux and the pas de deux from Les Sylphides. The documentary was released in the United States on 1 December 1965.[85]
16 May 1965[119] The Ed Sullivan Show CBS "Odette-Odile" Fonteyn and Nureyev danced excerpts from Swan Lake.[119]
23 May 1965[120] The Ed Sullivan Show CBS "Odette-Odile" Encore performance of Fonteyn and Nureyev dancing excerpts from Swan Lake.[120]

ReferencesEdit

CitationsEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Percival 2008.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Monahan 1957, p. 100.
  3. ^ Royal Opera House 1932.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Monahan 1957, p. 101.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af Royal Opera House 2001.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i Monahan 1957, p. 102.
  7. ^ a b c Royal Opera House 1940.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Monahan 1957, p. 103.
  9. ^ a b Royal Opera House 1941.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g Royal Opera House 1942.
  11. ^ a b c Royal Opera House 2009.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al Royal Opera House 1943.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Monahan 1957, p. 104.
  14. ^ Royal Opera House 1946c.
  15. ^ Royal Opera House 1946a.
  16. ^ a b c Royal Opera House 1946b.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Royal Opera House 1946d.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Royal Opera House 1946e.
  19. ^ Royal Opera House 1946f.
  20. ^ Royal Opera House 1947a.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Monahan 1957, p. 105.
  22. ^ Royal Opera House 1947b.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Royal Opera House 1947c.
  24. ^ Clarke 1955, p. 234.
  25. ^ Robert Helpmann Papers 1986.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i Monahan 1957, p. 106.
  27. ^ Royal Opera House 1950a.
  28. ^ Royal Opera House 1950b.
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  30. ^ Clarke 1955, p. 255.
  31. ^ a b Clarke 1955, p. 258.
  32. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Royal Opera House 1951a.
  33. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Royal Opera House 1951b.
  34. ^ a b c Royal Opera House 1951c.
  35. ^ Clarke 1955, p. 265.
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  37. ^ a b Clarke 1955, p. 270.
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  42. ^ Clarke 1955, p. 280.
  43. ^ a b c d Clarke 1955, p. 283.
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  45. ^ Clarke 1955, p. 286.
  46. ^ a b c Royal Opera House 1953.
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  49. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Monahan 1957, p. 110.
  50. ^ a b c d Monahan 1957, pp. 108-109.
  51. ^ a b c d e Royal Opera House 1954.
  52. ^ a b c Clarke 1955, p. 297.
  53. ^ a b c Monahan 1957, p. 109.
  54. ^ a b c d e f g h i Royal Opera House 1956b.
  55. ^ a b c d Monahan 1957, p. 111.
  56. ^ Royal Opera House 1957.
  57. ^ The Australian Women's Weekly 1957, p. 3.
  58. ^ a b c Royal Opera House 1956c.
  59. ^ a b Royal Opera House 1958a.
  60. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Royal Opera House 1958b.
  61. ^ a b Royal Opera House 1960.
  62. ^ The Hartford Courant 1962, p. 10.
  63. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Best 1962, p. 5.
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  66. ^ a b c d Solway 1998, p. 272.
  67. ^ a b c d Solway 1998, p. 273.
  68. ^ a b c d e Solway 1998, p. 276.
  69. ^ Solway 1998, p. 277.
  70. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Royal Opera House 1963b.
  71. ^ a b c Solway 1998, p. 306.
  72. ^ a b c d Solway 1998, p. 302.
  73. ^ Solway 1998, pp. 302-303.
  74. ^ Solway 1998, p. 303.
  75. ^ a b Solway 1998, p. 305.
  76. ^ a b c d e f Royal Opera House 1964.
  77. ^ Solway 1998, pp. 307-308.
  78. ^ Solway 1998, p. 314.
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  98. ^ a b The Asbury Park Press 1975, p. 9.
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  100. ^ a b Royal Opera House 1979.
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  103. ^ a b Ondaatje 2010.
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BibliographyEdit