List of hypothetical technologies

Hypothetical technologies are technologies that do not exist yet, but that could exist in the future.[1] They are distinct from emerging technologies, which have achieved some developmental success. Emerging technologies as of 2018 include 3-D metal printing and artificial embryos.[2] Many hypothetical technologies have been the subject of science fiction.

The criteria for this list are that the technology:

  1. Must not exist yet
  2. If the technology does not have an existing article (i.e. it is "redlinked"), a reference must be provided for it

BiologyEdit

Engineering and manufacturingEdit

Computing and roboticsEdit

MegastructuresEdit

NanotechnologyEdit

TransportEdit

Minds and psychologyEdit

PhysicsEdit

SpaceEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Andersen, David; Dawes, Sharon (1991). Government Information Management: A Primer and Casebook. Prentice Hall. p. 125.
  2. ^ "You'll want to keep an eye on these 10 breakthrough technologies this year". MIT Technology Review. Archived from the original on 2018-05-16. Retrieved 2018-05-17.
  3. ^ Unknown (August 29, 2018). "On the horizon: An acne vaccine". sciencedaily.com. Archived from the original on 2019-12-19. Retrieved 2019-09-11.
  4. ^ unknown (November 19, 2018). ""Anti-Evolution Drugs" Could Offer New Strategy against Antimicrobial Resistance Crisis". genengnews.com. Archived from the original on 2019-01-11. Retrieved 2019-04-29.
  5. ^ AJ Newson (January 1, 2005). "Artificial gametes: new paths to parenthood?". jme.bmj.com. Archived from the original on 2019-07-14. Retrieved 2019-07-13.
  6. ^ Andrés Caicedo (July 2, 2017). "Artificial Mitochondria Transfer: Current Challenges, Advances, and Future Applications". hindawi.com. Archived from the original on 2019-10-10. Retrieved 2019-10-09.
  7. ^ Tomasz P Jurkowski (March 4, 2015). "Synthetic epigenetics—towards intelligent control of epigenetic states and cell identity". Clinical Epigenetics. 7: 18. doi:10.1186/s13148-015-0044-x. PMC 4347971. PMID 25741388.
  8. ^ Unknown (May 28, 2014). "Universal antidote for snakebite: Experimental trial represents promising step toward". sciencedaily.com. Archived from the original on 2014-07-07. Retrieved 2019-09-11.
  9. ^ Yuriy Dmitriev (December 7, 2015). "Zero-energy Bio Refrigerator cools your food with future gel". inhabitat.com. Archived from the original on 2022-06-13. Retrieved 2019-11-07.
  10. ^ Natalie Parletta (July 26, 2018). "Can crab shells and trees replace plastics?". cosmosmagazine. Archived from the original on 2019-10-16. Retrieved 2019-10-15.
  11. ^ Ryszard Romaniuk (June 1, 2010). "Electronics and telecommunications in Poland, issues and perspectives Part II: Science, Research, Development, Higher Education". researchgate.net. Archived from the original on 2022-06-13. Retrieved 2019-09-24.
  12. ^ Bill Christensen (August 19, 2005). "Homeland Security Orders Modern Version of Jules Verne's Leyden Ball". livescience.com. Archived from the original on 2019-10-16. Retrieved 2019-10-15.
  13. ^ BuBa Arquitectos (February 15, 2015). "The Vertical Zoo: A wild greenery-wrapped tower that provides refuge for animalia". inhabitat.com. Archived from the original on 2022-06-13. Retrieved 2019-11-07.
  14. ^ Neetha J. Shetty (January 17, 2013). "Nanorobots: Future in dentistry". ncbi.nlm.nih.go. Vol. 25, no. 2. pp. 49–52. doi:10.1016/j.sdentj.2012.12.002. PMC 3723292. PMID 23960556.
  15. ^ Cambridge University (May 7, 2019). "S-money: Ultra-secure form of virtual money proposed". phys.org. Archived from the original on 2019-07-14. Retrieved 2019-09-24.
  16. ^ Kayla Matthews (December 2, 2018). "Vertical Cities: Can Mega-Skyscrapers Solve Urban Population Overload?". planetizen.com. Archived from the original on 2019-01-23. Retrieved 2019-03-05.
  17. ^ Shahar Polachek (September 22, 2017). "Nanomatrix Skyscraper". evolo.us. Archived from the original on 2019-10-10. Retrieved 2019-10-09.
  18. ^ Tiffany Trader (December 6, 2018). "Zettascale by 2035? China Thinks So". hpcwire.com. Archived from the original on 2022-06-13. Retrieved 2019-10-15.
  19. ^ a b c Frontiers in Neurosci (March 29, 2019). "Human Brain/Cloud Interface". ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Vol. 13. p. 112. doi:10.3389/fnins.2019.00112. PMC 6450227. PMID 30983948.
  20. ^ Sara Gates (July 10, 2014). "Could We One Day Learn A Language By Popping A Pill?". huffpost.com. Archived from the original on 2022-06-13. Retrieved 2019-05-25.
  21. ^ Rachel Riederer (February 20, 2017). "Memory Editing Technology Will Give Us Perfect Recall and Let Us Alter Memories at Will". vice.com. Archived from the original on 2019-09-24. Retrieved 2019-09-24.
  22. ^ Max Tegmark (August 29, 2017). "Superintelligence: a space odyssey". Financial Times. Archived from the original on 2019-07-10. Retrieved 2019-07-09.
  23. ^ David Adam (August 14, 2003). "US military pioneers death ray bomb". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2019-01-23. Retrieved 2019-05-22.
  24. ^ L.N. Epele (June 3, 2008). "Monopolium: the key to monopoles". The European Physical Journal C. 56 (1): 87–95. arXiv:hep-ph/0701133. Bibcode:2008EPJC...56...87E. doi:10.1140/epjc/s10052-008-0628-0. S2CID 17443696.
  25. ^ Andre Gsponer (February 2, 2008). "Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects". arXiv:physics/0510071.
  26. ^ Kristin Lewotsky (July 1, 2007). "The Promise of Plasmonics". spie.org. Archived from the original on 2022-06-13. Retrieved 2019-09-15.
  27. ^ Clay Dillow (November 16, 2010). "Metamaterial 'Space-Time Cloak' Conceals Not Just Objects, But Entire Events". Popsci.com. Archived from the original on 2020-12-16. Retrieved 2020-04-09.
  28. ^ Zeeya Merali (June 19, 2017). "Creating a Universe in the Lab? The Idea Is No Joke". blogs.discovermagazine.com. Archived from the original on 2019-09-20. Retrieved 2019-09-17.
  29. ^ a b c d Marc G. Millis (July 16, 1996). "The Challenge To Create The Space Drive" (PDF). ntrs.nasa.gov. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2019-09-28. Retrieved 2019-09-27.
  30. ^ Robert Zubrin (May 18, 2019). "Robert Zubrin has new propellantless space propulsion concept – Dipole Drive". nextbigfuture.com. Archived from the original on 2019-05-31. Retrieved 2019-05-30.
  31. ^ Jillian Scharr (June 26, 2013). "Why Warp Drives Aren't Just Science Fiction". Space.com. Archived from the original on 2019-04-02. Retrieved 2019-04-01.
  32. ^ David Kipping (March 11, 2019). "The Halo Drive: fuel-free relativistic propulsion of large masses via recycled boomerang photons". arXiv:1903.03423 [gr-qc].
  33. ^ Michio Kaku (March 15, 2011). "Physics of the Future". Doubleday.
  34. ^ Dattatreya Mandal (October 19, 2015). "MIT's conceptualized Mars habitat makes use of 'native' silica on the alien planet". hexapolis.com. Archived from the original on 2019-09-24. Retrieved 2019-09-24.
  35. ^ Young Bae (January 1, 2015). "The photonic railway". researchgate.net. Archived from the original on 2022-06-13. Retrieved 2019-07-19.
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  37. ^ David Kipping (July 10, 2019). "Transiting Quasites as a Possible Technosignature". iopscience.iop.org. Vol. 3, no. 7. p. 91. doi:10.3847/2515-5172/ab2fdb.
  38. ^ Mike Wall (March 25, 2011). "Water-Powered Spaceship Could Make Mars Trip on the Cheap". Space.com. Archived from the original on 2019-10-16. Retrieved 2019-10-15.
  39. ^ David Kipping (August 1, 2019). "The "Terrascope": On the Possibility of Using the Earth as an Atmospheric Lens". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. 131 (1005): 114503. arXiv:1908.00490. Bibcode:2019PASP..131k4503K. doi:10.1088/1538-3873/ab33c0. S2CID 199064594.
  40. ^ Brian Wang (March 19, 2013). "Thermonuclear Micro-Bomb Propulsion for Fast Interplanetary Missions by Friedwardt Winterberg". nextbigfuture.com. Archived from the original on 2019-09-25. Retrieved 2019-09-24.