List of Tennessee Volunteers bowl games

The Tennessee Volunteers college football team competes as part of the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), representing the University of Tennessee in the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). Since the establishment of the team in 1891, Tennessee has appeared in 53 bowl games.[1] Included in these games are 17 combined appearances in the traditional "big four" bowl games (the Rose, Sugar, Cotton and Orange) and two Bowl Championship Series (BCS) game appearances.[2][3]

Through the history of the program, eight separate coaches have led the Volunteers to bowl games with Phillip Fulmer having the most appearances with 15. Fulmer also led Tennessee to the Bowl Alliance national championship game in the 1998 Orange Bowl and the first BCS national championship game in the 1999 Fiesta Bowl. In January 2010, Derek Dooley was hired as head coach, and led the Volunteers to an appearance in the 2010 Music City Bowl.[4] A loss in that game brought Tennessee's overall bowl record to 25 wins and 24 losses, placing the Volunteers third among all FBS schools for bowl appearances. The Volunteers also appeared in the 2016 Music City Bowl vs Nebraska and won 38-24. The Volunteers final 2016 record was 9–4.

KeyEdit

Bowl gamesEdit

List of bowl games showing bowl played in, score, date, season, opponent, stadium, location, attendance and head coach[A 1]
# Bowl Score[A 2] Date Season[A 3] Opponent[A 4] Stadium Location Attendance[5] Head coach
0[A 5] New York Charity Game W 13–0 December 5, 1931 1931 New York University Yankee Stadium New York City 40,684[6]  Robert Neyland
1 Orange Bowl W 17–0 January 2, 1939 1938 Oklahoma Burdine Stadium[A 6] Miami 32,191  Robert Neyland
2 Rose Bowl L 0–14 January 1, 1940 1939 USC Rose Bowl Pasadena 92,200  Robert Neyland
3 Sugar Bowl L 13–19 January 1, 1941 1940 Boston College Tulane Stadium New Orleans 73,181  Robert Neyland
4 Sugar Bowl W 14–7 January 1, 1943 1942 Tulsa Tulane Stadium New Orleans 70,000 Robert Neyland
5 Rose Bowl L 0–25 January 1, 1945 1944 USC Rose Bowl Pasadena 68,000 Robert Neyland
6 Orange Bowl L 0–8 January 1, 1947 1946 Rice Burdine Stadium[A 6] Miami 36,152  Robert Neyland
7 Cotton Bowl Classic W 20–14 January 1, 1951 1950 Texas Cotton Bowl Dallas 75,349  Robert Neyland
8 Sugar Bowl L 13–28 January 1, 1952 1951 Maryland Tulane Stadium New Orleans 82,000 Robert Neyland
9 Cotton Bowl Classic L 0–16 January 1, 1953 1952 Texas Cotton Bowl Dallas 75,504  Robert Neyland
10 Sugar Bowl L 7–13 January 1, 1957 1956 Baylor Tulane Stadium New Orleans 81,000 Bowden Wyatt
11 Gator Bowl W 3–0 December 28, 1957 1957 Texas A&M Gator Bowl Stadium Jacksonville 41,160  Bowden Wyatt
12 Bluebonnet Bowl W 27–6 December 18, 1965 1965 Tulsa Rice Stadium Houston 40,000 Doug Dickey
13 Gator Bowl W 18–12 December 31, 1966 1966 Syracuse Gator Bowl Stadium Jacksonville 60,312  Doug Dickey
14 Orange Bowl L 24–26 January 1, 1968 1967 Oklahoma Miami Orange Bowl[A 6] Miami 77,993  Doug Dickey
15 Cotton Bowl Classic L 13–36 January 1, 1969 1968 Texas Cotton Bowl Dallas 72,000 Doug Dickey
16 Gator Bowl L 13–14 December 27, 1969 1969 Florida Gator Bowl Stadium Jacksonville 72,248  Doug Dickey
17 Sugar Bowl W 34–13 January 1, 1971 1970 Air Force Tulane Stadium New Orleans 78,655 Bill Battle
18 Liberty Bowl W 14–13 December 20, 1971 1971 Arkansas Memphis Memorial Stadium[A 7] Memphis 51,410  Bill Battle
19 Bluebonnet Bowl W 24–17 December 30, 1972 1972 LSU Houston Astrodome Houston 52,961 Bill Battle
20 Gator Bowl L 19–28 December 29, 1973 1973 Texas Tech Gator Bowl Stadium Jacksonville 62,109 Bill Battle
21 Liberty Bowl W 7–3 December 16, 1974 1974 Maryland Memphis Memorial Stadium[A 7] Memphis 51,284 Bill Battle
22 Bluebonnet Bowl L 22–27 December 31, 1979 1979 Purdue Houston Astrodome Houston 40,542 Johnny Majors
23 Garden State Bowl W 28–21 December 13, 1981 1981 Wisconsin Giants Stadium East Rutherford 38,782 Johnny Majors
24 Peach Bowl L 22–28 December 31, 1982 1982 Iowa Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium Atlanta 50,134 Johnny Majors
25 Florida Citrus Bowl W 30–23 December 17, 1983 1983 Maryland Citrus Bowl Orlando 50,183 Johnny Majors
26 Sun Bowl L 27–28 December 22, 1984 1984 Maryland Sun Bowl Stadium El Paso 50,126  Johnny Majors
27 Sugar Bowl W 35–7 January 1, 1986 1985 Miami Louisiana Superdome New Orleans 77,432 Johnny Majors
28 Liberty Bowl W 21–14 December 29, 1986 1986 Minnesota Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium[A 7] Memphis 51,327 Johnny Majors
29 Peach Bowl W 27–22 January 2, 1988 1987 Indiana Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium Atlanta 58,737  Johnny Majors
30 Cotton Bowl Classic W 31–27 January 1, 1990 1989 Arkansas Cotton Bowl Dallas 74,358 Johnny Majors
31 Sugar Bowl W 23–22 January 1, 1991 1990 Virginia Louisiana Superdome New Orleans 77,452 Johnny Majors
32 Fiesta Bowl L 17–42 January 1, 1992 1991 Penn State Sun Devil Stadium Tempe 71,133 Johnny Majors
33 Hall of Fame Bowl[A 8] W 38–23 January 1, 1993 1992 Boston College Tampa Stadium Tampa 52,056 Phillip Fulmer
34 Florida Citrus Bowl L 13–31 January 1, 1994 1993 Penn State Citrus Bowl Orlando 72,456  Phillip Fulmer
35 Gator Bowl W 45–23 December 30, 1994 1994 Virginia Tech Ben Hill Griffin Stadium Gainesville 62,200 Phillip Fulmer
36 Florida Citrus Bowl W 20–14 January 1, 1996 1995 Ohio State Citrus Bowl Orlando 70,797 Phillip Fulmer
37 Florida Citrus Bowl W 48–28 January 1, 1997 1996 Northwestern Citrus Bowl Orlando 63,467 Phillip Fulmer
38 Orange Bowl* L 42–17 January 2, 1998 1997 Nebraska Pro Player Stadium Miami Gardens 74,002 Phillip Fulmer
39 Fiesta Bowl* W 23–16 January 4, 1999 1998 Florida State Sun Devil Stadium Tempe 80,470  Phillip Fulmer
40 Fiesta Bowl L 21–31 January 2, 2000 1999 Nebraska Sun Devil Stadium Tempe 71,526 Phillip Fulmer
41 Cotton Bowl Classic L 21–35 January 1, 2001 2000 Kansas State Cotton Bowl Dallas 63,465 Phillip Fulmer
42 Florida Citrus Bowl W 45–17 January 1, 2002 2001 Michigan Citrus Bowl Orlando 59,653 Phillip Fulmer
43 Peach Bowl L 3–30 December 31, 2002 2002 Maryland Georgia Dome Atlanta 68,330 Phillip Fulmer
44 Peach Bowl L 14–27 January 2, 2004 2003 Clemson Georgia Dome Atlanta 75,125  Phillip Fulmer
45 Cotton Bowl Classic W 38–7 January 1, 2005 2004 Texas A&M Cotton Bowl Dallas 75,704 Phillip Fulmer
46 Outback Bowl[A 8] L 10–20 January 1, 2007 2006 Penn State Raymond James Stadium Tampa 65,601 Phillip Fulmer
47 Outback Bowl[A 8] W 21–17 January 1, 2008 2007 Wisconsin Raymond James Stadium Tampa 60,121 Phillip Fulmer
48 Chick-fil-A Bowl[A 9] L 14–37 December 31, 2009 2009 Virginia Tech Georgia Dome Atlanta 73,777 Lane Kiffin
49 Music City Bowl L 27–30 December 30, 2010 2010 North Carolina LP Field Nashville 69,143  Derek Dooley
50 TaxSlayer Bowl[A 10] W 45–28 January 2, 2015 2014 Iowa EverBank Field Jacksonville 56,310 Butch Jones
51 Outback Bowl[A 8] W 45–6 January 1, 2016 2015 Northwestern Raymond James Stadium Tampa 53,202 Butch Jones
52 Music City Bowl W 38–24 December 30, 2016 2016 Nebraska Nissan Stadium Nashville 68,496 Butch Jones
53 Gator Bowl W 23–22 January 2, 2020 2019 Indiana TIAA Bank Field Jacksonville 61,789 Jeremy Pruitt

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Statistics correct as of 2019–20 NCAA football bowl games.
  2. ^ Results are sortable first by whether the result was a Tennessee win, loss or tie and then second by the margin of victory.
  3. ^ Links to the season article for the Tennessee team that competed in the bowl for that year.
  4. ^ Links to the season article for the opponent that Tennessee competed against in the bowl for that year when available or to their general page when unavailable.
  5. ^ Game is considered an unofficial exhibition game by the NCAA
  6. ^ a b c Originally called Burdine Stadium, in 1960 it was renamed as the Miami Orange Bowl.
  7. ^ a b c Originally called Memphis Memorial Stadium, in 1976 it was renamed Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium.[7]
  8. ^ a b c d The Outback Bowl was previously known as the Hall of Fame Bowl (1986–1995).[8]
  9. ^ The Chick-fil-A Bowl was previously known as the Peach (1968–1996) and as the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl (1997–2005).[9]
  10. ^ The TaxSlayer Bowl was previously known as the Gator Bowl (1948–2014). The Gator Bowl name returned in 2018.[9]

ReferencesEdit

General
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). "Bowl/All-Star Game Records" (PDF). 2016 NCAA Division I Football Records. NCAA.org. Retrieved December 14, 2016.
Specific
  1. ^ Bowl/All-Star Game Records, p. 18
  2. ^ Bowl/All-Star Game Records, p. 28
  3. ^ Dunnavant, Keith (2004). The Fifty-Year Seduction: How Television Manipulated College Football, from the Birth of the Modern NCAA to the Creation of the BCS. Macmillan. pp. 93–99. ISBN 9780312323455. Retrieved March 11, 2012.
  4. ^ "Dooley introduced as Vols coach". ESPN.com. Associated Press. January 16, 2010. Retrieved March 11, 2012.
  5. ^ Bowl/All-Star Game Records, pp. 33
  6. ^ "Tennessee Invades East to Show Class in Trouncing N.Y.U 13-0".
  7. ^ Brown, Gary; Mike Morrison; Michael Morrison (2008). ESPN Sports Almanac 2008. ESPN. p. 187. ISBN 1933060387.
  8. ^ Bowl/All-Star Game Records, pp. 10–11
  9. ^ a b Bowl/All-Star Game Records, p. 8