Kristoffer Berntsson

Johan Kristoffer Berntsson (born 13 July 1982) is a Swedish former competitive figure skater. He is an eight-time (2000–2001, 2004–2005, 2007–2010) Swedish national champion and the five-time (2002–2005, 2007) Nordic Champion. Berntsson was the first Swede to land a triple Axel.[1]

Kristoffer Berntsson
Kristoffer BERNTSSON European Championships 2009.jpg
Berntsson in 2009
Personal information
Full nameJohan Kristoffer Berntsson
Country represented Sweden
Born (1982-07-13) 13 July 1982 (age 40)
Gothenburg, Sweden
Height1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
CoachAndrea Dohany
ChoreographerAndrea Dohany
Zerjon Abebe
Skating clubLandvetter KK
RetiredMarch 2011
ISU personal best scores
Combined total206.29
2007 Worlds
Short program69.02
2008 Worlds
Free skate140.20
2007 Worlds

CareerEdit

Berntsson began skating at age 5. Though he started out doing both hockey and figure skating, he soon focused exclusively on the latter.[2] Berntsson won the Swedish junior national champion in 1996–1997, a title he would go on to win the next two season as well. He skated on the international junior circuit starting in 1998–1999. In the 1999–2000 season, still skating primarily as a junior, Berntsson won the national title and made his senior debut at the European Championships, finishing 21st. He finished in the same place for the next two seasons, and failed to qualify for the free skate at the 2001, 2002 and 2003 Worlds.

Berntsson had better results in 2003–2004, winning a medal at the Finlandia Trophy and moving up to 13th at the Europeans and 21st at Worlds. His results continued to improve the next season, when he moved into the top ten at Europeans for the first time in his career and was 14th at Worlds. In the 2005–2006 season, Berntsson finished 11th at both his Grand Prix events, and lost the national title to Adrian Schultheiss. He was 14th at the 2006 Europeans and 23rd at both the 2006 Winter Olympic Games and at Worlds.

The 2006–2007 season was Berntsson's best yet. Following a bronze medal at the 2006 Nebelhorn Trophy, he finished 6th at the Cup of Russia and 9th at the NHK Trophy, then regained his national title. At the 2007 Europeans, Berntsson finished 10th, and he was a career-best 9th at 2007 Worlds, where he received a standing ovation following his disco-themed long program.[3] His placement qualified two slots for Sweden for the next World Championships, which were to be held in Gothenburg.[4]

Berntsson tore muscles in his leg at the end of July 2007,[5] and struggled in his fall events. He then finished 7th at the 2008 Europeans and 14th at Worlds.

Berntsson had hip surgery in April 2008.[6] He finished 8th at the 2009 Europeans but 20th at Worlds, which, combined with Adrian Schultheiss's 18th place, meant that Sweden would have only one men's entry at the Olympics. Although Berntsson won Swedish Nationals, he was bypassed in favor of Schultheiss after finishing 15th at Europeans.

Berntsson won the silver medal at the 2010 Finlandia Trophy.

In March 2011, Berntsson said he would no longer compete at major events but would remain involved in skating.[7]

Personal lifeEdit

Berntsson has an undergraduate degree in electrical engineering and is currently (2010) working toward a Master's degree in this field at Chalmers University of Technology.[8]

He plays the guitar and used to play in a band when he was younger.[9]

ProgramsEdit

Season Short program Free skating
2010–2011
[10]
Michael Jackson medley:
  • Smooth Criminal
  • Dirty Diana
  • Beat It
  • Come Together
2009–2010
[11]
2008–2009
[12]
  • La Valse D'Amelie
    by Yann Tiersen
  • Belleville Rendez-Vous
    by Ben Charest
  • Axel F
    by Harold Faltermeyer
  • Moments in Love
    by Art of Noise
  • Take On Me
    by A-HA
2007–2008
[13]
  • La Valse D'Amelie
    by Yann Tiersen
  • Belleville Rendez-Vous
    by Ben Charest
  • Boogie Wonderland
    (from "Madagascar")
  • Studio 54
    by Dan Hartman
  • Disco Inferno
    (Saturday Night Fever)
    by The Trammps
2006–2007
[14]
  • Merecunde
    by Titanes de la Salsa
  • La Vida es un Carneval
    by Celia Cruz
  • Saturday Night Fever
    by Bee Gees
  • Studio 54
    by Dan Hartman
  • Boogie Wonderland
    by Earth, Wind and Fire
2005–2006
[15]
  • Merecunde
    by Titanes de la Salsa
  • La Vida es un Carneval
    by Celia Cruz
  • Bombay Dreams
    by A.R. Rahman
  • Between Heaven and Earth
    by A.R. Rahman
2004–2005
[16]
  • She Wants to Move
    by N.E.R.D.
  • Breathe
    by Prudigy
  • Prince Igor
    by Alexandr Borodin
2003–2004
[17]
  • Like I Love You
    (instrumental)
    by Justin Timberlake
  • Session
    by Linkin Park
  • Mona Lisa Overdrive
    by Juno Reactor, Don Davis
  • The Time Machine
    by Klaus Badelt
2001–2003
[18][19]
  • Fear is the Key
    by R. Budd and his Orchestra
  • Paper Tiger
    by R. Budd
    The National Philharmonic Orchestra
2000–2001
[1]
  • Smoke on the Water
    The Moscow Symphony Orchestra
  • But we Never Talk Love at Large
    by Mark Isham, Wamen Zevon
  • Legends Indigo Spirit
    by The Brave
  • Yeah "Color of Love"
    by Ronne Earl and Broadsters

Competitive highlightsEdit

GP: Grand Prix; JGP: Junior Grand Prix

International[20]
Event 96–97 97–98 98–99 99–00 00–01 01–02 02–03 03–04 04–05 05–06 06–07 07–08 08–09 09–10 10–11
Olympics 23rd
Worlds 31st 29th 31st 21st 14th 23rd 9th 14th 20th
Europeans 21st 21st 21st 15th 13th 10th 14th 10th 7th 8th 15th 14th
GP Cup of China 8th
GP Cup of Russia 11th 6th 10th 8th
GP NHK Trophy 9th 12th
GP Skate America 11th 11th
GP Skate Canada 11th
Bofrost Cup 4th
Crystal Skate 1st
Finlandia Trophy 10th 3rd 6th 2nd
Golden Spin 7th 12th 9th
Schäfer Memorial 4th 3rd
Merano Cup 3rd
Nebelhorn Trophy 9th 14th 16th
Nordics 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 3rd
Universiade 11th
International: Junior[20]
Junior Worlds 22nd
JGP Bulgaria 15th
JGP China 12th
JGP Germany 14th
JGP Netherlands 9th 12th
JGP Norway 7th
JGP Sweden 6th
EYOF 3rd
Nordics 1st J 2nd J
National[20]
Swedish Champ. 1st J 1st J 1st J 1st 1st 1st 1st 2nd 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st
J = Junior level; WD = Withdrew

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Kristoffer BERNTSSON: 2000/2001". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 17 April 2001.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  2. ^ Mittan, Barry (13 April 2004). "Sweden's Berntsson Learns It's Different Near the Top". GoldenSkate. Archived from the original on 4 February 2011. Retrieved 22 December 2010.
  3. ^ Kaye, Rosaleen (23 March 2007). "2007 World Figure Skating Championships - Men's Free Skate Highlights". GoldenSkate. Archived from the original on 12 January 2010. Retrieved 22 December 2010.
  4. ^ Osborne, Magdalena (2008). "Kristoffer Berntsson: –"It'll be a once in a lifetime experience"". Absolute Skating. Retrieved 22 December 2010.
  5. ^ Flade, Tatjana (24 September 2007). "Kristoffer Berntsson: Looking forward to rocking the home crowd". GoldenSkate. Archived from the original on 22 January 2010. Retrieved 22 December 2010.
  6. ^ Osborne, Magdalena (2008). "Camp Malmö, Sweden". Absolute Skating. Archived from the original on 23 November 2008. Retrieved 23 December 2010.
  7. ^ Jangbro, Eva Maria (12 March 2011). "Kristoffer Berntsson: "I will continue to skate!"". Absolute Skating. Retrieved 14 April 2011.
  8. ^ Klintland, Natalia (2010). "Kristoffer Berntsson: "No retirement for me yet."". Absolute Skating. Retrieved 22 December 2010.
  9. ^ Shinkarenko, Olga (2009). "The Mystery - Kristoffer Berntsson". Absolute Skating. Archived from the original on 29 March 2009. Retrieved 22 December 2010.
  10. ^ "Kristoffer BERNTSSON: 2010/2011". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 13 November 2011.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  11. ^ "Kristoffer BERNTSSON: 2009/2010". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 24 January 2010.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  12. ^ "Kristoffer BERNTSSON: 2008/2009". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 3 June 2009.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  13. ^ "Kristoffer BERNTSSON: 2007/2008". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 29 May 2008.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  14. ^ "Kristoffer BERNTSSON: 2006/2007". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 24 May 2007.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  15. ^ "Kristoffer BERNTSSON: 2005/2006". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 15 June 2006.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  16. ^ "Kristoffer BERNTSSON: 2004/2005". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 30 July 2005.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  17. ^ "Kristoffer BERNTSSON: 2003/2004". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 4 June 2004.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  18. ^ "Kristoffer BERNTSSON: 2002/2003". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 18 June 2003.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  19. ^ "Kristoffer BERNTSSON: 2001/2002". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 11 February 2002.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  20. ^ a b c "Competition Results: Kristoffer BERNTSSON". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017.

External linksEdit