Kommersant (Russian: Коммерсантъ, IPA: [kəmʲɪrˈsant], The Businessman or Commerce Man, often shortened to Ъ) is a nationally distributed daily newspaper published in Russia mostly devoted to politics and business. The TNS Media and NRS Russia certified July 2013 circulation of the daily was 120,000–130,000.[1] It is owned by Alisher Usmanov.[2]

Kommersant
Logo Kommersant.svg
Kommersant.png
Front page on 27 December 2010
TypeDaily newspaper
Owner(s)Alisher Usmanov
Founded1989; 33 years ago (1989)
LanguageRussian
HeadquartersMoscow
Circulation120,000–130,000 (July 2013)
Websitewww.kommersant.ru

HistoryEdit

In 1989, with the onset of press freedom in Russia, Kommersant was founded under the ownership of businessman and publicist Vladimir Yakovlev.[3][4] The first issue was released in January 1990.[5] It was modeled after Western business journalism.[4]

The newspaper's title is spelled in Russian with a terminal hard sign (ъ) – a letter that is silent at the end of a word in modern Russian, and was thus largely abolished by the post-revolution Russian spelling reform, in reference to a pre-Soviet newspaper of the same name active between 1909 and 1917.[5] This is played up in the Kommersant logo, which features a script hard sign at the end of somewhat more formal font. The newspaper also refers to itself or its redaction as "Ъ".

Founded as a weekly newspaper, it became popular among business and political elites.[5] It then became a daily newspaper in 1992.[5][6] It was owned by the businessman Boris Berezovsky from 1999 until 2006, when he sold it to Badri Patarkatsishvili.[4][6] In September 2006, it was sold to Alisher Usmanov.[6]

In January 2005, Kommersant published a protest at a court ruling ordering it to publish a denial of a story about a crisis at Alfa-Bank.[7]

In 2008, BBC News said Kommersant was one of Russia's leading liberal business broadsheets.[8]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Kommersant Website; (Russian)". 2013. Retrieved 1 September 2015.
  2. ^ Poberezhskaya, Marianna (1 January 2015). "Media coverage of climate change in Russia: Governmental bias and climate silence". Public Understanding of Science. 24 (1): 96–111. doi:10.1177/0963662513517848. ISSN 0963-6625.
  3. ^ "Kommersant; Presseurop (English)". Presseurop. 2012. Retrieved 13 April 2012.
  4. ^ a b c "Media Map". Index on Censorship. 37 (1): 183–189. 1 February 2008. doi:10.1080/03064220701882780. ISSN 0306-4220.
  5. ^ a b c d Arrese, Ángel (1 March 2017). "The role of economic journalism in political transitions". Journalism. 18 (3): 368–383. doi:10.1177/1464884915623172. ISSN 1464-8849.
  6. ^ a b c Koikkalainen, Katja (1 December 2007). "The local and the International in Russian business journalism: Structures and practices". Europe-Asia Studies. 59 (8): 1315–1329. doi:10.1080/09668130701655176. ISSN 0966-8136.
  7. ^ "Alfa-d Up". Kommersant. Moscow. 31 January 2005. Archived from the original on 6 June 2011. Retrieved 28 August 2009.
  8. ^ "The press in Russia". BBC News. 16 May 2008. Retrieved 29 November 2014.

External linksEdit