Kakizoe Tōru

Kakizoe Tōru (垣添 徹, Kakizoe Tōru) (born August 12, 1978 in Usa City, Ōita Prefecture, Japan), is a former sumo wrestler. A former amateur champion, he turned professional in 2001 and reached the top division in 2003. His highest rank was komusubi, which he held for just one tournament. He won one special prize, for Technique. After injury problems he fell to the third makushita division in 2011 and retired in April 2012, becoming a sumo coach. Since 2013, he is part of ex-yokozuna Musashimaru's new Musashigawa stable.

垣添 徹
Kakizoe Tōru
Kakizoe 08 Sep.jpg
Personal information
BornKakizoe Tōru
(1978-08-12) August 12, 1978 (age 41)
Ōita
Height1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Weight139 kg (306 lb; 21.9 st)
Career
StableFujishima
UniversityNippon Sport Science University
Record388-430-15
DebutSeptember 2001
Highest rankKomusubi (March 2004)
RetiredApril 2012
Elder nameIkazuchi
Championships1 (Jūryō)
Special PrizesTechnique (1)
* Up to date as of September 14, 2016.

CareerEdit

Kakizoe was an amateur sumo champion at Nippon Sport Science University, winning the Kokutai (Japan Games) and the All Japan University Championship in 2000, his final year, which earned him the amateur yokozuna title. He joined Musashigawa stable, which, at the time, was one of the strongest in sumo with yokozuna Musashimaru and other successful former collegiate competitors such as Dejima and Miyabiyama amongst its wrestlers. Because of his amateur success, Kakizoe was given makushita tsukedashi status, meaning he was able to debut at the makushita 15 ranking. He was the first makushita tsukedashi entrant to be put at #15 instead of the bottom of the makushita division.[1] He had initially hoped to debut in March 2001, but his entry was delayed because of a nagging injury.[1] Although his first appearance on the banzuke was in September 2001, he was still unable to compete and dropped to makushita #55. He fought his first professional bout in November 2001 instead, fighting under his real name. Unusually, he never adopted a traditional shikona. He rose to the jūryō division in March 2003 and the top makuuchi division in September 2003.

 
Kakizoe in May 2009

Kakizoe's rank peaked at komusubi after the January 2004 tournament when, ranked maegashira 5, he achieved a result of 11-4 and the technique prize. He failed to retain his san'yaku rank for more than a single tournament, but mostly remained amongst the top half of maegashira for the next few years. However, he suffered a big setback in May 2007, losing eleven bouts in a row before pulling out of the tournament citing a fracture to his right knee. He could manage only six wins on his return in July and slid to the lowest rung on the top division ladder for the September tournament. He produced a comfortable 9-6 score there to maintain his top division status, but remained near the bottom of makuuchi for the next two years.

In January 2010, he rose to maegashira 4 and fought his first bout against a yokozuna since his injury. Due to the absence of Chiyotaikai and Kotomitsuki, on the final day he took part in the san'yaku soroibumi ceremony. He finished the tournament with a respectable 6-9 record, but was unable to produce a kachi-koshi or winning score in the next four tournaments either.

Kakizoe's 3-12 performance in September 2010 saw him demoted to jūryō for the first time and he lost sekitori status after scoring only 4-11 at Juryo 9 in January 2011. Despite only scoring a make-koshi 3-4 in the May 2011 "technical examination" tournament, he was nonetheless promoted back to jūryō because of the large number of slots available after the forced retirements of many wrestlers following a match-fixing scandal. However, his return to jūryō was short-lived as he turned in a disastrous 1-14 score, his ninth consecutive make-koshi.

Retirement from sumoEdit

Troubled by a foot injury, Kakizoe fell to Makushita 56 for the May 2012 tournament, the sixth lowest rank ever held by a former san'yaku wrestler.[2] He announced his retirement before the tournament began, and stayed in sumo as a coach at his stable (now renamed Fujishima stable) under the elder name Oshiogawa Oyakata. In October 2012, he switched to the Ikazuchi name. In August 2013, when his former stablemate Musashimaru established his own Musashigawa stable, Kakizoe moved with him.

Fighting styleEdit

Kakizoe was an oshi-sumo specialist, preferring pushing and thrusting techniques. His most common winning move was oshi-dashi (push-out), which accounted for around 43 percent of his career victories.[3] He was vulnerable to defeat if his opponents grab hold of his mawashi.

FamilyEdit

Kakizoe is married, with two children.

Career recordEdit

Kakizoe Tōru[4]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2001 x x x x Makushita tsukedashi #15
Sat out due to injury
0–0–7
East Makushita #55
6–1
 
2002 West Makushita #26
4–3
 
East Makushita #23
6–1
 
West Makushita #8
1–1–5
 
West Makushita #28
4–3
 
West Makushita #20
4–3
 
East Makushita #14
6–1
 
2003 East Makushita #3
5–2
 
East Jūryō #11
9–6
 
East Jūryō #6
10–5
 
East Jūryō #2
11–4
Champion

 
East Maegashira #11
8–7
 
West Maegashira #8
8–7
 
2004 East Maegashira #5
11–4
T
East Komusubi #1
6–9
 
West Maegashira #2
6–9
 
West Maegashira #5
7–8
 
West Maegashira #6
10–5
 
East Maegashira #2
6–9
 
2005 West Maegashira #4
8–7
 
West Maegashira #2
6–9
 
West Maegashira #5
9–6
 
East Maegashira #1
7–8
 
East Maegashira #2
7–8
 
West Maegashira #2
4–11
 
2006 West Maegashira #7
8–7
 
East Maegashira #6
9–6
 
West Maegashira #1
6–9
 
West Maegashira #3
4–11
 
West Maegashira #8
9–6
 
West Maegashira #4
6–9
 
2007 East Maegashira #9
8–7
 
West Maegashira #6
8–7
 
East Maegashira #3
0–12–3
 
East Maegashira #16
6–9
 
West Maegashira #16
9–6
 
East Maegashira #14
9–6
 
2008 East Maegashira #11
6–9
 
West Maegashira #14
8–7
 
East Maegashira #13
6–9
 
West Maegashira #15
7–8
 
West Maegashira #16
10–5
 
East Maegashira #8
5–10
 
2009 West Maegashira #12
8–7
 
East Maegashira #12
7–8
 
West Maegashira #14
8–7
 
West Maegashira #8
6–9
 
East Maegashira #11
9–6
 
West Maegashira #5
8–7
 
2010 East Maegashira #4
6–9
 
West Maegashira #7
7–8
 
East Maegashira #8
7–8
 
West Maegashira #9
3–12
 
West Maegashira #15
3–12
 
East Jūryō #7
7–8
 
2011 West Jūryō #9
4–11
 
West Makushita #1
Tournament Cancelled
0–0–0
West Makushita #1
3–4
 
West Jūryō #11
1–14
 
East Makushita #9
4–3
 
West Makushita #6
1–6
 
2012 West Makushita #16
3–4
 
West Makushita #22
0–7
 
West Makushita #56
Retired
0–0
x x x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Musashigawa Beya Collegian Kakizoe Fails to Compete in Debut". Sumo World. November 2001: 6. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  2. ^ "2012 May Grand Sumo Tournament Banzuke Topics". Japan Sumo Association. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012.
  3. ^ "Kakizoe bouts by kimarite". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2 August 2009.
  4. ^ "Rikishi in Juryo and Makunouchi". szumo.hu. Retrieved 2007-07-24.

External linksEdit