In Guezzam Province

The Wilaya of In Guezzam (Arabic: ولاية عين قزّام) is a newly created province in far southern Algeria that was created on December 18, 2019, after the Cabinet of Algeria passed a bill that created 10 new provinces in a rare move. Prior to that there was no creation of provinces in Algeria for 35 years. In Guezzam is the southernmost and least populous province of Algeria, as it lies along the border with Niger, and has a population of 11,202 in the present boundaries during the 2008 census. The capital of the province is also called In Guezzam as all Algerian provinces are required to be named after their capitals.

In Guezzam Province
ولاية عين قزّام
DZ-58 (2019).svg
Coordinates: 19°34′20″N 5°46′10″E / 19.57222°N 5.76944°E / 19.57222; 5.76944Coordinates: 19°34′20″N 5°46′10″E / 19.57222°N 5.76944°E / 19.57222; 5.76944
CountryAlgeria
CapitalIn Guezzam
Area
 • Total88,126 km2 (34,026 sq mi)
Elevation
276 m (906 ft)
Population
 (2008)[1]
 • Total11,202
 • Density0.13/km2 (0.33/sq mi)

HistoryEdit

The province was approved on May 27, 2015. The province was confirmed on November 26, 2019, and implemented the following month. Prior to 2019 it was part of Tamanrasset Province.

Administrative divisionsEdit

The province consists of 2 daïra of which both are coextensive with the 2 communes which are In Guezzam with a population 7,045 in 2008,[2] and Tin Zaouatine with a population of 4,157 in 2008.[2] The boundaries of the province are exactly the same as the old In Guezzam District that was part of Tamanrasset Province.

District Commune Arabic
In Guezzam District In Guezzam عين قزام
Tin Zaouatine District Tin Zaouatine تين زاوتين

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Office National des Statistiques, Recensement General de la Population et de l’Habitat 2008 Archived July 24, 2008, at the Wayback Machine Preliminary results of the 2008 population census. Retrieved July 2, 2008.
  2. ^ a b "Population: Wilaya de Tamanrasset" (PDF) (in French). Office National des Statistiques Algérie. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 13, 2011. Retrieved May 30, 2013.

External linksEdit