Hurricane Blas (2022)

Hurricane Blas was a Category 1 hurricane that brought winds and flooding to several Mexican states in June 2022. The second named storm and second hurricane of the 2022 Pacific hurricane season, Blas developed from a low-pressure area off the coast of southwestern Mexico. It became a tropical depression on June 14. and strengthened into a tropical storm later that same day. Blas became a hurricane the next day, while paralleling the coast. The system reached its peak intensity on June 17, at 15:00 UTC, with maximum sustained winds of 80 knots (90 mph; 150 km/h) and a central pressure of 976 mbar (28.82 inHg). Later, Blas turned to the west and weakened, becoming a tropical depression on June 20, before transitioning into a post-tropical cyclone on that same day.

Hurricane Blas
Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS/NWS)
Blas 2022-06-16 1745Z.jpg
Hurricane Blas displaying an eye while intensifying off the Mexican coast on June 16
FormedJune 14, 2022
DissipatedJune 23, 2022
(Post-tropical after June 19)
Highest winds1-minute sustained: 85 mph (140 km/h)
Lowest pressure978 mbar (hPa); 28.88 inHg
Fatalities4 total
DamageMinimal
Areas affectedSouthwestern Mexico, Revillagigedo Islands
Part of the 2022 Pacific hurricane season

Damage from the hurricane was minor as it remained offshore.[1] All totaled, Blas was responsible for the deaths of four people in Mexico.[2]

Meteorological historyEdit

 
Map plotting the storm's track and intensity, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale
Map key
  Tropical depression (≤38 mph, ≤62 km/h)
  Tropical storm (39–73 mph, 63–118 km/h)
  Category 1 (74–95 mph, 119–153 km/h)
  Category 2 (96–110 mph, 154–177 km/h)
  Category 3 (111–129 mph, 178–208 km/h)
  Category 4 (130–156 mph, 209–251 km/h)
  Category 5 (≥157 mph, ≥252 km/h)
  Unknown
Storm type
  Extratropical cyclone / Remnant low / Tropical disturbance / Monsoon depression

On June 7, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) began tracking a disturbance with potential for potential tropical development south of the Gulf of Tehuantepec.[3] Late on June 10, a broad low-pressure area formed off the coast of southwestern Mexico, producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms in an environment conducive for gradual development.[4] By 09:00 UTC on June 14, the low had become a tropical depression while it was situated about 395 mi (635 km) south-southeast of Manzanillo, Colima.[5] Six hours later, the depression strengthened into a tropical storm, and was assigned the name Blas.[6] The storm's convective organization continued to improve through the day according to satellite imagery,[7] maintaining a well-defined structure and developing prominent convective banding features,[8] as a circular central dense overcast overcast became embedded on the system.[9] On June 15, Blas began to rapidly intensify as it developed an inner core, and at 15:00 UTC that day, it became a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir–Simpson scale.[10] Blas then developed a mid-level eye on the western portions of the cyclone,[11] then maintained its intensity due to very cold cloud tops near the center and a strong upper-level outflow in three of the storm's quadrants.[12]

Blas strengthened slightly on June 17, with its maximum sustained winds increasing to near 90 mph (150 km/h) and a minimum central barometric pressure of 976 mbar (28.82 inHg).[13] Soon after, the cyclone began to weaken as it moved westward.[14] At 03:00 UTC on June 18, Blas weakened to a tropical storm due to the mid-level center being sheared off to the southwestern side of the storm combined with colder sea surface temperatures as it moved north-west, with no deep convection near the surface center.[15] The storm continued to weaken that day, with satellite images showing a partially exposed low-level center with convection confined to the southeastern quadrant of its circulation.[16][17]

Despite persistent wind-shear and transiting over cool waters with temperatures below 79 °F (26 °C), Blas maintained limited convection on the eastern half into June 19.[18] By 21:00 UTC that day, only a few broken convective bands remain to the north and northeast of the storm's center,[19] and by 03:00 UTC on June 20, satellite imagery indicated that it had lost almost all of its organized deep convection.[20] With little or no convection remaining in association with Blas, along with their being no longer tropical-storm force winds in the circulation, the NHC downgraded the storm to a tropical depression six hours later.[21] By 15:00 UTC that same day, Blas transitioned to a post-tropical cyclone about 350 mi (565 km) southwest of the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula.[22] The remnant low later dissipated over the northern Pacific on June 24.[23]

Preparations and impactEdit

 
Hurricane Blas starting to weaken on June 17

On June 16, state authorities in Oaxaca placed 60 municipalities, all still recovering from the impacts of Hurricane Agatha, on alert as Blas neared.[24] Ports were also closed.[25] In the state of Guerrero, schools were closed across 21 municipalities, including: Costa Chica, Costa Grande, and Acapulco; classes were also suspended in Michoacán.[2] Blas was responsible for four deaths.[2] Two bodies were found at a beach in Acapulco with the cause of death unknown, but presumed to be storm-related. One Acapulco resident sustained injuries after a wall collapsed in her home.[26] In the state of Puebla, two people were killed by a landslide in Eloxochitlán.[2]

Blas caused only minor damage in Guerrero according to local authorities.[1] At Acapulco, winds and rains from Blas caused beach erosion of over 980 ft (300 m) in length from El Morro beach.[27] In Tecpán de Galeana, several acres (hectares) of banana crops were destroyed by strong winds.[28] Two streams overflowed in Acapulco, flooding eight neighborhoods. Flooding was also reported in Manzanillo and Villa de Álvarez in Colima.[2] Power outages were reported in Zihuatanejo and in Atoyac.[29][30]

Authorities in Nayarit said that at least 100 people had been displaced by flooding in that state in the aftermath of the hurricane.[31] Governor Miguel Ángel Navarro Quintero pledged that actions would be taken to rebuild the houses destroyed by the storm.[32] Soon after Blas passed, the National Guard was activated to help in the cleanup and removal of debris in Michoacán and Guerrero.[33]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Huracán Blas deja daños menores en el sur de México" [Hurricane Blas leaves minor damage in southern Mexico]. France 24. Agence France-Presse. June 16, 2022. Archived from the original on June 22, 2022. Retrieved June 22, 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Blas deja 4 muertos y daños en 3 entidades" [Blas leaves 4 dead and damages 3 entities]. La Razón (in Spanish). June 17, 2022. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 17, 2022.
  3. ^ Pasch, Richard (June 7, 2022). Five Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 7, 2022.
  4. ^ Reinhart, Brad (June 10, 2022). Two Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 10, 2022.
  5. ^ Cangialosi, John (June 14, 2022). Tropical Depression Two-E Advisory Number 1 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 14, 2022.
  6. ^ Blake, Eric; Bucci, Lisa (June 14, 2022). Tropical Storm Blas Advisory Number 2 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 14, 2022.
  7. ^ Bucci, Lisa; Blake, Eric (June 14, 2022). Tropical Storm Blas Discussion Number 3 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 14, 2022.
  8. ^ Pasch, Richard; Hogsett, Wallace (June 14, 2022). Tropical Storm Blas Discussion Number 4 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 14, 2022.
  9. ^ Beven, Jack (June 15, 2022). Tropical Storm Blas Discussion Number 5 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  10. ^ Pepin, Philippe (June 15, 2022). Hurricane Blas Discussion Number 6 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  11. ^ Papin, Philippe (June 15, 2022). Hurricane Blas Discussion Number 7 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  12. ^ Pasch, Richard; Bucci, Lisa (June 15, 2022). Hurricane Blas Discussion Number 8 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  13. ^ Cangialosi, John (June 17, 2022). Hurricane Blas Advisory Number 14 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 17, 2022.
  14. ^ Cangialosi, John (June 17, 2022). Hurricane Blas Discussion Number 15 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 17, 2022.
  15. ^ Blake, Eric (June 17, 2022). Tropical Storm Blas Discussion Number 16 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 17, 2022.
  16. ^ Cangialosi, John (June 18, 2022). Tropical Storm Blas Discussion Number 18 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 18, 2022.
  17. ^ Cangialosi, John (June 18, 2022). Tropical Storm Blas Discussion Number 19 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 18, 2022.
  18. ^ Zelinsky, Rachel (June 19, 2022). Tropical Storm Blas Discussion Number 21 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 19, 2022.
  19. ^ Cangialosi, John (June 19, 2022). Tropical Storm Blas Discussion Number 23 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 19, 2022.
  20. ^ Blake, Jack (June 19, 2022). Tropical Storm Blas Discussion Number 24 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 19, 2022.
  21. ^ Pasch, Richard (June 20, 2022). Tropical Depression Blas Discussion Number 25 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 20, 2022.
  22. ^ Reinhart, Brad (June 20, 2022). Post-Tropical Cyclone Blas Advisory Number 26 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 20, 2022.
  23. ^ "Product Loops 5 Days". College Park, Maryland: Ocean Prediction Center. June 24, 2022. Archived from the original on June 25, 2022. Retrieved June 25, 2022.
  24. ^ "Blas ya es huracán; prenden alerta en cinco estados" [Blas is already a hurricane; they turn on alert in five states]. La Razón (in Spanish). Archived from the original on June 21, 2022. Retrieved 2022-06-21.
  25. ^ "Hurricane Blas prompts port closure in southern Mexico". CNBC. June 17, 2022. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 17, 2022.
  26. ^ Fernández, Alina. "Paso del huracán "Blas" por Guerrero deja dos personas muertas y una herida" [Hurricane "Blas" passing through Guerrero leaves two people dead and one injured]. Latinus. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 17, 2022.
  27. ^ "Lluvias y alto oleaje del huracán Blas se comen playa de Acapulco" [Rains and high waves of Hurricane Blas eat Acapulco beach]. Quadratín Guerrero (in Mexican Spanish). June 20, 2022. Archived from the original on June 22, 2022. Retrieved June 22, 2022.
  28. ^ "Destrozan rachas de viento por Blas cultivos de plátano en Tecpan" [Blas gusts of wind destroy banana crops in Tecpan]. Quadratín Guerrero (in Mexican Spanish). June 16, 2022. Archived from the original on June 22, 2022. Retrieved June 22, 2022.
  29. ^ Blancas, Luis; Magaña, Francisco; Guerrero, Alejandro (June 17, 2022). "Diversos daños deja Blas a su paso por Guerrero; se prevén más lluvias hoy" [Various damages leave Blas on his way through Guerrero; more rain is expected today]. El Sur Guerrero (in Mexican Spanish). Archived from the original on June 24, 2022. Retrieved June 24, 2022.
  30. ^ "Apagones de hasta 12 horas en Zihuatanejo por el huracán Blas" [Blackouts of up to 12 hours in Zihuatanejo due to Hurricane Blas]. Quadratín Guerrero (in Mexican Spanish). June 16, 2022. Archived from the original on June 23, 2022. Retrieved June 24, 2022.
  31. ^ "Blas deja colonias afectadas durante su paso en Nayarit" ['Blas' leaves at least 35 colonies affected during its passage in Nayarit] (in Mexican Spanish). Telediario. Archived from the original on June 21, 2022. Retrieved June 21, 2022.
  32. ^ "Reconstruirán viviendas dañadas por tormentas en Tepic, anunció el Gobernador Navarro" [They will rebuild houses damaged by storms in Tepic, announced Governor Navarro] (in Spanish). NTV. June 19, 2022. Archived from the original on June 21, 2022. Retrieved June 20, 2022.
  33. ^ "GN apoya a población de Michoacán y Guerrero ante afectaciones por huracán "Blas"" [GN supports population of Michoacán and Guerrero against affectations by hurricane Blas] (in Spanish). La Razón. Archived from the original on June 21, 2022. Retrieved June 21, 2022.

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