Hugh Millikin

Hugh Ronald Alexander Millikin (born 4 July 1957 in North Vancouver, British Columbia) is an Australian curler originally from Ottawa, Ontario.

Hugh Millikin
Born (1957-07-04) 4 July 1957 (age 64)
Team
SkipHugh Millikin
FourthDean Hewitt
ThirdIan Palangio
SecondChristopher Ordog
Career
Member Association Ontario (1985-1986)
 Australia (1991-present)
World Championship
appearances
11 (1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008)
World Mixed Doubles Championship
appearances
2 (2010, 2011)
Pacific-Asia Championship
appearances
24 (1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2017 )
Olympic
appearances
1 (1992)

CareerEdit

In 1986, while still residing in the Canadian province of Ontario, Millikin played second position for Dave Van Dine's Canadian Mixed Curling Championship team.

Millikin would later move to Australia and has skipped the Australian team to nine Pacific Curling Championships titles. Millikin has also participated in 11 World Curling Championships. The team's top placements have been sixth place in 1992, 1993 and 2008. Millikin also went to the 1992 Winter Olympics, skipping the Australian team to a seventh-place finish in the demonstration event.

Millikin and his team used travel back to his hometown Ottawa to practice and to participate in local curling tournaments. Their team coach was Earle Morris, father of John Morris.

At the 2008 World Men's Curling Championship, he skipped Australia to a 5–6 record, the most wins ever for Australia. The team came an end short from forcing a tie-breaker.

The Australian team missed qualification for the 2010 Winter Olympics by 0.5 points, finishing ranked 11th in the world, with only the top ten qualifying for the games.[1]

Current team matesEdit

Millikin has skipped the Senior Australian team in the past, last participating in the 2018 World Senior Curling Championships in Ostersund, Sweden, finishing 5th. His teammates were:

  • Lead: Tim McMahon
  • Second: Steve Johns
  • Third: Geoff Davis
  • Alternate: John Anderson

AwardsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Baum, Greg (26 February 2010). "Australian curlers ponder what might have been". The Age. Melbourne.

External linksEdit