Glandèves Cathedral

Glandèves Cathedral (French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame-de-la-Sède de Glandèves or Cathédrale Notre-Dame-de-la-Sède d'Entrevaux[1]), now the Chapelle de l'Hôpital, is a Roman Catholic church located in the former town of Glandèves, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence. It was abandoned in the Middle Ages for the more secure site of the present Entrevaux. Only the chevet remains, which has been converted into a chapel. The cathedral is a national monument of France.[2]

Glandèves Cathedral
Cathédrale Notre-Dame-de-la-Sède de Glandèves
Détail-Notre-Dame-de-la-Seds-Entrevaux.JPG
Glandèves Cathedral
Religion
AffiliationRoman Catholic Church
ProvinceBishop of Glandèves
RegionAlpes-de-Haute-Provence
RiteRoman
Ecclesiastical or organizational statusCathedral
StatusActive
Location
LocationGlandèves,  France
Geographic coordinatesCoordinates: 43°57′3″N 6°49′23″E / 43.95083°N 6.82306°E / 43.95083; 6.82306
Architecture
Typechurch
Groundbreaking17th century

HistoryEdit

 
The chevet of the former cathedral, converted to a chapel

The ancient town of Glandèves occupied an exposed site that was frequently attacked and pillaged. In the 11th century the inhabitants moved to a more secure and defensible settlement at Entrevaux, although the Bishop of Glandèves remained seated at the cathedral on the old site.

 
Frontage of the converted chapel

Between 1609 and 1624 a new cathedral (Entrevaux Cathedral, or the Cathédrale Notre-Dame-de-l'Assomption d'Entrevaux)[3] was built in Entrevaux, which became the seat of the diocese at its completion.

The Diocese of Glandèves ceased to exist in the Concordat of 1801 which reformed the ecclesiastical structure of France following the French Revolution, and its territory was divided between the Diocese of Digne and the Diocese of Nice.

The old cathedral and the adjoining episcopal palace buildings were sold during the Revolution and subsequently used as a boarding house and a hospital, whence the alternative name for the present chapel as the Chapelle de l'Hôpital. The remaining structure dates from the 12th century, with some work from the later 16th century. The conversion to the chapel is modern.

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ also de la Sed or de la Seds
  2. ^ Base Mérimée: PA04000005, Ministère français de la Culture. (in French) Ancienne cathédrale de Glandèves, Notre-Dame de la Sed, dite aussi chapelle de l'Hôpital
  3. ^ the new cathedral was also known as Glandèves Cathedral, from the name of the diocese.

External linksEdit