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State Route 28 (SR 28) is a 25.7-mile-long (41.4 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Georgia. It exists in two distinct segments separated by the northern segment of South Carolina Highway 28 (SC 28), which connects the two segments. The northern segment is located in the northeastern corner of the Chattooga River District of the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest. The southern segment is entirely within the Augusta metropolitan area. SR 28 consists of Georgia's segments of a multi-state Route 28 that includes one segment of North Carolina Highway 28 (NC 28) and two segments of SC 28. The northern segment of SR 28 is unnamed, but the southern segment is known as Furys Ferry Road from its western terminus to the intersection with SR 104 Conn. in Augusta, Washington Road in the northern part of Augusta, John C. Calhoun Expressway, Greene Street, 5th Street, and Broad Street in downtown Augusta, and Sand Bar Ferry Road in the northeastern part of Augusta.

State Route 28 marker

State Route 28
Route information
Maintained by GDOT
Length25.7 mi[3][4] (41.4 km)
Existed1937[1][2]–present
Northern section
Length7.9 mi[4] (12.7 km)
West end NC 28 at the North Carolina state line north of Satolah
East end SC 28 at the South Carolina state line over the Chattooga River
Southern section
Length17.8 mi[3] (28.6 km)
West end SC 28 at the South Carolina state line over the Savannah River northwest of Martinez
Major
junctions
East end SC 28 at the South Carolina state line over the Savannah River at Augusta
Location
CountiesRabun, Columbia, Richmond
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
SR 27US 29

The northern segment was formerly SR 65 until 1932 and then SR 105 until 1937. The southern segment was formerly SR 52. In 1937, both SR 105 and SR 52 were redesignated as SR 28. It also used all of Broad Street until after the completion of the John C. Calhoun Expressway. The portion of SR 28 between 15th Street and 13th Street was proposed as SR 736 before the John C. Calhoun Expressway was extended along SR 736's path, and SR 28 was shifted onto it.

Contents

Route descriptionEdit

Northern segmentEdit

The northern segment of SR 28 is a 7.9-mile-long (12.7 km) highway. It begins at the North Carolina state line, where the roadway continues as North Carolina Highway 28 (NC 28). The highway is a twisting route that is completely within the Chattooga River District of the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest in Rabun County. There are only two settlements on the highway, Satolah and Pine Mountain. It crosses over the Chattooga River on the Russell Bridge into South Carolina, where it continues as the northern segment of South Carolina Highway 28 (SC 28).[4]

Southern segmentEdit

 
Georgia State Route 28 (Greene Street) in Augusta

SR 28 resumes where SC 28 meets the state line on the Furys Ferry Bridge, northwest of Martinez. It travels through rural areas of Columbia County and passes Jones Creek Golf Course before entering Martinez. In town, SR 28 passes by West Lake Country Club and continues to the southeast. After that, it enters Richmond County and the city limits of Augusta. Approximately 1,000 feet (300 m) after an intersection with SR 104 (Riverwatch Parkway) is an intersection with the eastern terminus of SR 104 Conn. (Washington Road). Here, SR 28 takes on the Washington Road name. Just under 1 mile (1.6 km) later, is an interchange with Interstate 20 (I-20; Carl Sanders Highway). Then, it curves to the east-southeast. It skirts along the northeastern part of Augusta National Golf Club, where the Masters Tournament is held every spring. After that, SR 28 curves to the south-southeast. At a partial interchange with the western terminus of Broad Street, the Washington Road name ends and the John C. Calhoun Expressway designation begins. The expressway skirts along the southwestern and southern edges of Lake Olmstead. It travels under Milledge Road and has an interchange with Eve Street and Crawford Avenue. A few hundred feet later, it has a partial interchange with 15th Street. The roadway then travels over St. Sebastian Way. After crossing over the Augusta Canal and SR 4 (13th Street), the expressway ends and SR 28 becomes known as Greene Street. It turns left onto 5th Street and then meets US 25 Bus. (Broad Street). US 25 Bus./SR 28 travel to the southeast on Broad Street. At an interchange with US 1/US 25/US 78/US 278/SR 10/SR 121 (Gordon Highway), US 25 Bus. ends, and SR 28 continues through the Olde Town section of the city. During a slight southerly jog, the local street name transitions to Sand Bar Ferry Road. SR 28 travels to the southeast and has an interchange with I-520 (Bobby Jones Expressway) and Laney Walker Boulevard. It curves to the south-southeast and intersects the eastern terminus of Laney Walker Boulevard Extension; then, the road curves to the east and again meets the South Carolina state line, where the road crosses over the Savannah River on the Sand Bar Ferry Bridge and continues, again as the southern segment of SC 28, and retains the Sand Bar Ferry Road name.[3]

All of SR 28, from the intersection with SR 104 Conn. to the eastern terminus of the southern segment, is included as part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[5][6]

HistoryEdit

1920s and 1930sEdit

The roadway that would eventually become SR 28 was established as SR 65 from the North Carolina state line, north-northwest of Pine Mountain, to the South Carolina state line, south-southeast of it. Also, SR 52 was established from the South Carolina state line, northwest of Augusta, to another point on the state line, south-southeast of the city.[7][8] Between November 1930 and January 1932, the entire length of SR 52 had a "completed hard surface".[9][10] Between May and August 1932, SR 65 was redesignated as SR 105.[11][12] Between October 1937 and January 1938, SR 105 was redesignated as the northern segment of SR 28, while SR 52 was redesignated as the southern segment. At this time, SR 28 and SR 104 traveled concurrently on Broad Street from the northern part of Augusta to the US 25/SR 21 (13th Street) intersection, where SR 104 reached its eastern terminus. US 25/SR 21/SR 28 was indicated to travel southeast on Broad Street to the US 1/US 25/US 78/SR 4/SR 10/SR 12/SR 21 (7th Street) intersection, where US 25/SR 21 departed and US 1/US 78/SR 4/SR 10/SR 12 joined. The six highways were indicated to travel southeast on Broad Street for two blocks to 5th Street, where SR 28 continued as before.[1][2] Between September 1938 and July 1939, the entire length of the northern segment had a completed hard surface.[13][14]

1940s to 1960sEdit

Between January 1945 and November 1946, SR 104 was truncated off of SR 28 to the Columbia–Richmond county line.[15][16] Between June 1954 and June 1955, US 1/US 78/SR 4/SR 10/SR 12 was shifted off of SR 28 to travel on 5th Street.[17][18] By July 1957, the east end of the US 25 concurrency was shifted from 7th Street to 5th Street.[18][19] Between June 1960 and June 1963, US 25 was shifted off of SR 28 to travel concurrently with US 1/US 78/US 278/SR 4/SR 10. The former path, partially on SR 28, was redesignated as US 25 Bus.[20][21] Between the beginning of 1957 and the beginning of 1966, an unnumbered road was proposed from SR 28 (Broad Street) just south of Lake Olmstead south-southeast, east-southeast, and southeast to Walton Way just west-northwest of 13th Street.[22][23] Between June 1963 and January 1966, the interchange with US 1/US 25/US 78/US 278/SR 10/SR 121 (Gordon Highway) was built.[21][24]

1960s to 1980sEdit

Between the beginning of 1966 and the beginning of 1973, the unnumbered road in Augusta was extended southeast to Gwinnett Street at Gordon Highway.[23][25] In 1976, Washington Road was extended on the previously unnumbered road from SR 28 to 15th Street, paralleling SR 28 for its entire length.[26][27] In 1980, this extension was renamed as John C. Calhoun Expressway.[28][29] The next year, SR 21 was truncated out of the Augusta area, and SR 4 was rerouted in the city, onto 13th Street. Thus, both highways no longer traveled concurrent with US 25 Bus./SR 28.[29][30] In 1982, SR 736 was proposed to connect the eastern terminus of the John C. Calhoun Expressway, at 15th Street, with the western terminus of Greene Street, at SR 4 (13th Street).[30][31] In 1985, SR 28 was shifted southwest, off of Broad Street northwest of 5th Street, and onto John C. Calhoun Expressway, the proposed path of SR 736, and Greene Street.[32][33]

Major intersectionsEdit

CountyLocationmi[4][3]kmDestinationsNotes
Rabun0.00.0  NC 28 north (Walhalla Road) – HighlandsNorth Carolina state line; continuation into North Carolina
Chattooga River7.912.7  SC 28 south (Highlands Highway) – WalhallaRussell Bridge; South Carolina state line; continuation into South Carolina
See SC 28 for intersections.
Savannah River0.00.0  SC 28 north – Clarks HillFurys Ferry Bridge; South Carolina state line; continuation into South Carolina
Columbia
No major junctions
RichmondAugusta6.710.8   SR 104 (Riverwatch Parkway) to I-20 – Martinez, Augusta, Brookfield Park
7.011.3  SR 104 Conn. west (Washington Road) / Kings Chapel Road south – Evans, LincolntonEastern terminus of SR 104 Conn. and Furys Ferry Road; northern terminus of Kings Chapel Road; SR 28 takes on Washington Road name.
7.912.7   I-20 (Carl Sanders Highway / SR 402) to SR 104 east – Atlanta, ColumbiaI-20 exit 199
10.516.9Broad Street east – Lake Olmstead StadiumInterchange; eastbound exit and westbound entrance; eastern terminus of Washington Road; western terminus of John C. Calhoun Expressway and Broad Street; interchange also serves Morningside Drive and Lakemont Drive.
11.318.2Eve Street / Crawford AvenueSplit diamond interchange
12.219.615th Street – Downtown Augusta, Medical District, Paine CollegeHalf diamond interchange; eastbound exit & westbound entrance; signed as "Fifteenth Street"
13.121.1Greene Street westInterchange; eastbound exit and westbound entrance; eastern terminus of John C. Calhoun Expressway; SR 28 takes on Greene Street name.
14.122.7  US 25 Bus. north (Broad Street) / 5th Street northWestern end of US 25 Bus. concurrency; roadway continues to north-northeast as 5th Street.
14.222.9         US 1 / US 25 / US 78 / US 278 / SR 10 / SR 121 (Gordon Highway) / US 25 Bus. ends – Louisville, Waynesboro, Columbia, Augusta Regional AirportInterchange; southern terminus of US 25 Bus.; eastern end of US 25 Bus. concurrency; westbound traffic has to make a U-turn for access to Gordon Highway; one ramp from Gordon Highway leads to Bay Street.
16.226.1   I-520 (Bobby Jones Expressway / SR 415) / Laney Walker Boulevard – Augusta Regional AirportI-520 exit 16
Savannah River17.828.6  SC 28 south (Sand Bar Ferry Road) – Beech IslandSand Bar Ferry Bridge; South Carolina state line; continuation into South Carolina
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  2. ^ a b Georgia State Highway Board (January 1, 1938). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d Google (January 16, 2017). "Overview map of SR 28's southern section" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 16, 2017.
  4. ^ a b c d Google (January 16, 2017). "Overview map of SR 28's northern section" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 16, 2017.
  5. ^ National Highway System: Georgia (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved February 12, 2017.
  6. ^ National Highway System: Augusta-Richmond County, GA--SC (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved January 16, 2017.
  7. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1920). System of State Aid Roads as Approved Representing 4800 Miles of State Aid Roads Outside the Limits of the Incorporated Towns (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  8. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1921). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  9. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (November 1930). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  10. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  11. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (May 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  12. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (August 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  13. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (September 1, 1938). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  14. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1939). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  15. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1945). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  16. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1946). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 29, 2017. (Corrected to November 7, 1946.)
  17. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1954). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 29, 2017. (Corrected to June 1, 1954.)
  18. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1955). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 29, 2017. (Corrected to June 1, 1955.)
  19. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1957). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 29, 2017. (Corrected to July 1, 1957.)
  20. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1960). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map) (1960–1961 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 29, 2017. (Corrected to June 1, 1960.)
  21. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1963). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 29, 2017. (Corrected to June 1, 1963.)
  22. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1957). General Highway Map: Richmond County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation – via GDOT Maps.
  23. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1966). General Highway Map: Richmond County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation – via GDOT Maps.
  24. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1966). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  25. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1973). General Highway Map: Richmond County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation – via GDOT Maps.
  26. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1976). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1976–1977 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  27. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1977). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1977–1978 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  28. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1980). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1980–1981 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  29. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1981). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1981–1982 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  30. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1982). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  31. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1983). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1983–1984 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  32. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1984). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1984–1985 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  33. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1986). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1986–1987 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 29, 2017.

External linksEdit