Open main menu

U.S. Route 25 (US 25) is a U.S. Highway that travels from Brunswick, Georgia to the Kentucky-Ohio state line, where Covington, Kentucky meets Cincinnati, Ohio at the Ohio River. In the U.S. state of Georgia, US 25 is as a 190.0-mile-long (305.8 km) highway that travels south to north in the eastern part of the state, near the Atlantic Ocean, serving Brunswick, Statesboro, and Augusta on its path from Brunswick to South Carolina at the Savannah River. Its routing travels through portions of Glynn, Wayne, Long, Tattnall, Evans, Bulloch, Jenkins, Burke, and Richmond counties.

U.S. Highway 25 marker

U.S. Highway 25
Route of US 25 in Georgia in red
Route information
Maintained by GDOT
Length190.0 mi[3] (305.8 km)
Existed1929-1932[1][2]–present
Major junctions
South end US 17 / SR 25 / SR 25 Conn. in Brunswick
 
North end US 1 / US 25 / US 78 / US 278 / SC 121 / SR 10 / SR 121 at the GeorgiaSouth Carolina state line on the northeast edge of Augusta
Location
CountiesGlynn, Wayne, Long, Tattnall, Evans, Bulloch, Jenkins, Burke, Richmond
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
SR 24SR 25

The segment of US 25/SR 121 from Interstate 16 (I-16) south-southwest of Statesboro north to Millen is the western segment of the Savannah River Parkway, a four-lane divided highway that roughly parallels the Savannah River. The segment from Millen north to I-520 in Augusta is the combined segment of the parkway. This highway is being considered for inclusion as part of I-3, which is ultimately planned to stretch from Savannah to Knoxville, Tennessee.

Contents

Route descriptionEdit

Glynn CountyEdit

US 25 begins at an intersection with US 17/SR 25 (Glynn Avenue) in the southern part of Brunswick in Glynn County. This intersection also marks the southern terminus of SR 25 Connector. This intersection is west of the Marshes of Glynn Overlook Park and is north of Howard Coffin Park. US 25 and SR 25 Connector travel concurrently on Gloucester Street to the west-southwest. At the intersection with US 341/SR 27 (Oglethorpe Street), SR 25 Connector ends, and US 25 begins a nearly 39-mile-long (63 km) concurrency with US 341/SR 27. The three highways travel to the north-northwest. Just after F Street, they curve to the north-northeast and skirt along the western edge of Gateway Park. On the northern edge of the park, they intersect Newcastle Street and turn left, back to the north-northwest. Between L and M Streets, the concurrency passes just to the southwest of Orange Park, and between Q and R Streets, they pass to the southwest of Palmetto Park. Between the intersection with Oak Street/1st Street, US 25/US 341/SR 27 pass Greenwood Cemetery. Between 2nd and 5th Streets, they pass Selden Park. Between 4th and 7th Streets, they pass Palmetto Cemetery. At 7th Street, they enter Dock Junction. Just before 9th Street, the concurrency passes Acco Park. Farther to the north-northwest, they intersect SR 303 (Blythe Island Highway/Community Road). The roadway passes to the southwest of Ballard Park and cross over the Brunswick–Altamaha Canal. Immediately, US 25/US 341/SR 27 begin to curve to the northwest. Approximately 0.5 miles (0.80 km) later, they cross over Yellow Bluff Creek. Only about 1,500 feet (460 m) later, they have an interchange with Interstate 95 (I-95; Purple Heart Trail). At Crispen Boulevard, the concurrency leaves the city limits of Dock Junction. They cross over Burnett Creek and travel through Pyles Marsh, before curving back to the north-northwest. Immediately after that curve, the three highways travel through Brobston. Just before entering Sterling, they pass east of Sterling Park. In town, they intersect SR 99, as well as the eastern terminus of SR 32. The highways travel through Pennick and Zuta, before passing to the southeast of Berry Lake. After traveling through Everett, they enter Wayne County.[3]

Wayne CountyEdit

When the concurrent routes pass Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, they curve back to the northwest, travel through Mt. Pleasant and cross over Alex Creek. After traveling through Grangerville, Pendarvis, and Gardi, they make a slight westward jog in Odessa; then, they cross over Ponholloway Creek, before entering Jesup. In town, US 25 splits off from US 341/SR 27 (East Cherry Street) to the north-northwest and intersects US 301/SR 23, with which US 25 begins traveling concurrently. The three highways travel to the north-northeast in the northeast part of the city. They curve to the north-northwest, before curving to the north and meeting US 84/SR 38, which join the concurrency. Immediately afterward, the five highways travel to the north-northeast and leave the city limits. The concurrency travels through rural parts of the county, before traveling through Doctortown, and curving to the northeast and crossing over the Altamaha River into Long County on the Dr. J. Alvin Leaphart, Sr. Memorial Bridge.[3]

Long CountyEdit

US 25/US 84/US 301/SR 23/SR 38 continue to the northeast and travel through rural areas of the county, crossing over Forrest Pond, Back Swamp (in two places), Corker Branch, Fountain Branch, Brickyard Branch, and Jones Creek on its way to Ludowici. In town, the concurrency intersects SR 57 south, which travels to the southeast. At this intersection, US 25/US 301/SR 23, as well as SR 57 north travel to the northwest, while US 84/SR 38 continue to the northeast. After a slight jog to the east, the roadway crosses through Wefanie. Just before leaving the county, they intersect the southwest terminus of former SR 261, today known as Marcus Nobles Road. Right after that, they curve to the north-northwest and cross over Beards Creek into Tattnall County.[3]

Tattnall CountyEdit

US 25/US 301/SR 23/SR 57 travel to the east of Kicklighters Pond. After an intersection with the western terminus of SR 196, the roadway curves to the north-northeast and enters Glennville. At an intersection with SR 144 (Barnard Street), SR 23/SR 57 depart the concurrency to the northwest. At this intersection, US 25/US 301 continue to the north-northeast, concurrent with SR 73, which begins here. Just after leaving the city limits, the highways pass the Georgia Veterans Memorial Cemetery – Glennville, Stricklands Pond, and Strickland Pond Dam. Alongside Smith State Prison, the concurrency begins to curve to the north. They curve back to the north-northeast and cross over Beards Creek just before intersecting the southern terminus of what used to be SR 250. After passing to the east of Durrence Pond, just west of Midway, US 25/US 301/SR 73 cross into Evans County.[3]

Evans CountyEdit

The concurrency passes to the east of Union Cemetery and then to the west of Evans Heights Golf Club. Approximately 2,000 feet (610 m) later, it crosses over Bull Creek. After a westward jog past Richards Pond, the highways curve to a due north routing and enter Claxton. In downtown, they intersect US 280/Georgia State Route 30 (Main Street). Just before leaving town, the highways curve to the northeast. Just northeast of the city limits, US 25/US 301/SR 73 pass southeast of the Claxton Sewage Treatment Pond and the Claxton Sewage Treatment Pond Dam. About 2,000 feet (610 m) later, they cross over the Canoochee River on the Claxton Bridge. They provide access to the Claxton–Evans County Airport and then curve to the north-northwest. After curving back to the north-northeast, the highways curve to a due north routing and intersect the northern terminus of SR 169. About 1 mile (1.6 km) later, they cross into Bulloch County.[3]

Bulloch CountyEdit

Almost immediately, the three highways curve to the north-northwest, passing Ephesus Cemetery, and curve back to the north-northeast and pass by Nevils Pond and Nevils Pond Dam. They again curve to the north-northwest and have an interchange with I-16 (Jim Gillis Historic Savannah Parkway). US 25/US 301/SR 73 curve to a nearly due north routing briefly before curving to the northeast and intersect SR 46, southeast of Register, just before crossing over Lotts Creek. The highways pass Riggs Lake and Riggs Lake Dam. Later on, they travel through Jimps, just before passing a campus of Ogeechee Technical College. They intersect the southern terminus of US 25 Bypass/SR 67 Bypass and US 301 Bypass/SR 73 Bypass (Veterans Memorial Parkway) and enter Statesboro. They pass just to the west of Georgia Southern University and skirt along the eastern edge of W. Jones Lane Memorial Park. They curve to the north-northeast and cross over Little Lotts Creek before intersecing SR 67 (Fair Road). In downtown, they curve to the north-northwest and intersect US 80/Georgia State Route 26 (Northside Drive East). At this intersection, US 301/SR 73 continue to the north-northwest, while US 25/SR 67 travel to the west-southwest, concurrent with US 80/SR 26. The four highway curve to the north-northwest before assuming a more northwestrly routing. After leaving the city limits, they intersect the northern terminus of US 25 Bypass/SR 67 Bypass. They provide access to William James Middle School. In Hopeulikit, the four highways curve to the north-northwest; then, US 80/SR 26 split off to the southwest. About 5 miles (8.0 km) later, US 25/SR 67 enter Jenkins County.[3]

Jenkins CountyEdit

After continuing to the north-northwest, US 25/SR 67 pass just to the northeast of Paynes Chapel Cemetery and Clifton Cemetery, before they curve to the north-northeast. Then, they intersect SR 121, which joins the concurrency. Approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) later, immediately after traveling through Emmalane, they intersect SR 23, which also joins the concurrency. At Union Camp Logging Road, the four highways curve to the northeast and cross over the Ogeechee River. Just after entering Millen, they begin to curve to the north-northeast and intersect SR 17 Bypass (South Gray Street), which joins the concurrency. At an intersection with SR 17 (Winthrope Avenue), SR 17 Bypass ends, and SR 23/SR 67 depart the concurrency to the east. Less than 1,000 feet (300 m) before leaving town, US 25/SR 121 curve to the north-northwest. On the northern edge of the city limits, they intersect the northern termninus of SR 21. The two highways pass the Magnolia Springs Country Club and travel through the southwestern part of Magnolia Springs State Park, in the community of Lawton. On the northwestern edge of the park, they pass Millen Airport and curve back to the north-northeast, passing Magnolia View Lake and travel to the west of Perkins; then they curve once again to the north-northwest and enter Burke County.[3]

Burke CountyEdit

The concurrency travels just to the west of Munnerlyn, passing Jenkins Lake, and make a slight westward jog, and curve to a due north routing before curving back to the north-northwest in Idlewood and passing Burke County Airport. They intersect the southern terminus of US 25 Bypass/SR 121 Bypass (Burke Veterans Parkway). The mainline highways turn to the right and curve back to the north-northwest and have an interchange with the bypass route. Just before entering Waynesboro the roadway passes to the west of the Burke County campus of Augusta Technical College. In town, they curve to the north-northeast and intersect SR 24, which joins the concurrency. The three highways travel to the northwest and pass Burke Medical Center and the Burke County Museum. They intersect SR 56/SR 80 (6th Street). At this intersection, SR 24 departs the concurrency to the southwest. Just past 9th Street, they pass Burkeland Garden. About 300 feet (91 m) past the West 13th Street/Peachtree Street intersection, the concurrency begins to curve to the north-northeast to an intersection with the northern terminus of US 25 Bypass/SR 121 Bypass. The mainline highways turn left and begin curving to the north-northwest and leave town; then, they curve to a nearly due north routing. They cross over Walnut Branch and Brier Creek, before traveling to the west of Stockton Pond. Approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) later, the highways cross over McBean Creek into Richmond County and the city limits of Augusta.[3]

Richmond CountyEdit

 
Former Kmart store on Gordon Highway in Augusta

Just before passing the Pointe South Golf Club, US 25/SR 121 begin to travel along the Hephzibah–Augusta city line. They intersect the eastern terminus of SR 88. After curving to the north-northeast, they re-enter Augusta proper. They pass the Richmond Factory Pond and Richmond Factory Pond Dam and curve to the northeast. Then they pass by the East Central Regional Hospital–Gracewood. The two highways curve to the north and cross over Butler Creek and make a gradual winding path to an interchange with I-520 (Bobby Jones Expressway), passing to the west of Foss Park and the Charles B. Webster Detention Center and to the east of Rollins Elementary School and Sego Middle School along the way. US 25/SR 121 intersect Windsor Spring Road, which is also part of the I-520 interchange. The roadway curves to the north-northeast. At the intersection with Lumpkin Road, they pass Alleluia Community School and are just to the west of Elliot Park. The concurrency crosses over Rocky Creek just southeast of Lombard Pond. It curves to the northeast and intersects the southern terminus of Tubman Home Road and the northern terminus of SR 56 (Mike Padgett Highway). Approximately 0.2 miles (0.32 km) later, they have an interchange with US 1/US 78/US 278/SR 10 (Gordon Highway) and begin to travel concurrently with those four highways. The six-highway concurrency continue to the northeast, to an intersection with the southern terminus of Molly Pond Road and the northern terminus of Doug Barnard Parkway (former SR 56 Spur). Just before that intersection, the roadway begins to curve to the north-northeast. The highways pass just to the northwest of Magnolia Cemetery, Cedar Grove Cemetery, and May Park and southeast of James Brown Arena. A short distance later, they pass to the east of Old Medical College and the Old Government House, then an interchange with US 25 Business/SR 28 (Broad Street). Here, US 25 Business meets its southern terminus. Just after this interchange, the highway crosses over the Savannah River into South Carolina. At the state line, SR 10/SR 121 end, while US 1/US 25/US 78/US 278, concurrent with SC 121 curve to the northeast toward North Augusta.[3]

National Highway SystemEdit

From its southern terminus, in Brunswick,[4] to Ludowici[5] and from I-16, south-southwest of Statesboro[5] to its northern terminus, on the northeastern edge of Augusta[6] are included as part of the National Highway System.

HistoryEdit

1920sEdit

The road that would later be designated as part of US 25 was established in 1920 as an unidentified road from Brunswick to about Sterling, SR 27 from that point to Jesup, SR 38 from Jesup to Ludowici, SR 23 from Statesboro to Millen, and SR 21 from Millen to Augusta.[7] By the end of the next year, SR 23 was designated between Ludowici and Glennville, SR 26 was designated on a routing southwest of, and into, Statesboro, SR 46 was designated between Statesboro and Hopeulikit, and SR 67 was designated from Hopeulikit to a point southwest of Millen. The latter two supplanting SR 23, which was re-routed on a more westerly path.[7][8] By the end of 1926, US 341 was designated along SR 27 between Brunswick and Jesup.[8][9] By the end of 1929, US 80 had been designated along SR 46 between Statesboro and Hopeulikit.[9][1]

1930sEdit

By 1932, US 341/SR 27 were paved in Glynn County. Also, SR 73 was designated from Clayton to an intersection with SR 26 southwest of Statesboro, approximately where I-16 is today. Farther to the north-northwest, US 25 was designated from Hopeulikit to Augusta, and US 25/SR 21 were paved from Waynesboro to Augusta.[1][2] That January, the positions of SR 26 and SR 46 were swapped.[2][10] In April, SR 23's Ludowici–Darien segment was redesignated as part of SR 99; SR 23 was re-reouted along SR 38 between Jesup and Ludowici.[11][12] By May 1933, that Jesup–Ludowici segment of SR 23/SR 38 was paved.[13][14] In May, US 25/SR 21 were paved from Millen to just north of the Jenkins–Burke county line.[14][15] In July, SR 23 was paved from the Long–Tattnall county line to Glennville.[16][17] In late 1934, SR 73 was extended southward from Claxton to Glennville. A vert short stretch of SR 46 south of Statesboro was paved. US 25/SR 67 was paved from just southeast of the SR 23 intersection south-southwest of Millen and into that town.[14][18] Between June and October 1935, US 25/SR 21 was paved between the Jenkins–Burke county line and Waynesboro.[19][20] At the end of that year, nearly half of US 341/SR 27, between the Glynn–Wayne county line and Jesup, was paved.[20][21] In mid-to-late 1936, SR 46 was paved from the SR 73 intersection southwest of Statesboro into the city.[22][23] About one year later, all of US 341/SR 27 between Brunswick and Jesup were paved. Also, a short stretch of SR 23 northwest of Ludowici was paved.[24][25] In August 1938, all of SR 23 between Ludowici and Glennville was paved.[26][27] By mid-1939, US 25 was designated along US 341/SR 27 between Sterling (and perhaps Brunswick) and Jesup. It was also designated along SR 23 between Ludowici and Glennville and along SR 73 between Claxton and the intersection with SR 46, southwest of Statesboro. It is unclear whether it was designated along the stretches of roadway in between those.[27][28]

1940sEdit

Between April and July 1941, US 25/SR 73, between the Evans–Bulloch county line and the intersection with SR 46, were paved.[29][30] In 1942, SR 73 was paved from Glennville to the Tattnall–Evans county line.[31][32] In 1943, SR 73 was paved all the way from Glennville to Claxton.[32][33] By the end of 1946, US 25 was designated along SR 23/SR 38 between Jesup and Ludowici. In Augusta, US 25 (and presumably SR 21) approached downtown on Savannah Road. It intersected US 1/US 78 (Milledgeville Road). The three highways traveled to the northeast on Twiggs Street until just past Gwinnett Street, where they curved to the north-northeast onto 7th Street. At the intersection with SR 28 (Broad Street), US 1/US 78 turned right, while US 25 turned left. At 13th Street, US 25 turned to the right and crossed into South Carolina. Also, all stretches of road from Brunswick to Augusta were paved.[34][35] By the middle of 1948, US 301 was designated along US 25/SR 23 from Ludowici to Glennville.[35][36]

1950sEdit

By the end of 1953, US 301 was designated along SR 73 between Glennville and Claxton.[37][38] In 1955, US 278 was added to the intersection of US 1/US 78 and US 25 in Augusta. Also, US 1/US 78 left the concurrency with US 25 just past Gwinnett Street and turned right onto Calhoun Street, then left onto 8th Street.[39][40] In 1956, the four U.S. highways in Augusta were re-routed on a bypass to the east of the main part of downtown. The former route of US 78 became part of SR 12, and the former route of US 1 became part of SR 4. SR 4 also took the former route of US 25 through the city, but ended at SR 28. US 25 followed the bypass onto 8th Street with US 1/US 78/US 278. At the intersection with SR 28, it turned left as it had done previously, just a little farther to the east-southeast. It appears that US 278 ended at this intersection. SR 21 followed Savannah Road and ended at the intersection with SR 4.[40][41]

1960sEdit

By the middle of 1960, US 25 was no longer routed on Broad and 13th Streets. It was re-routed to continue following US 1/US 78 and SR 10, which had only recently joined the concurrency. In its place was the newly commissioned US 25 Business.[41][42] Between 1960 and 1963, SR 121 was designated, concurrent with US 25, as it does today.[43][44] At least as far back as 1965, US 25/US 341/SR 27 traveled through Brunswick on Norwich Street, before being moved slightly to the west. During this time period, the eastern bypass in Augusta was named Gordon Highwy. SR 121's concurrent section was designated along US 25, as it exists today. The Gordon Highway–Broad Street intersection was reconfigured into an interchange.[44][45]

1980sEdit

In the early part of the decade, SR 21's concurrency with US 25 was truncated at Millen.[46][47] Between 1983 and 1986, US 25/US 341/SR 27 were moved to the west in Brunswick to follow Newcastle Street.[48][49]

Major intersectionsEdit

CountyLocationmi[3]kmDestinationsNotes
GlynnBrunswick0.00.0    US 17 / SR 25 (Glynn Avenue) / SR 25 Conn. begins – St. Simons, Darien, Savannah, Jekyll Island, Woodbine, JacksonvilleSouthern terminus of US 25 and SR 25 Conn.; southern end of SR 25 Conn. concurrency
1.11.8    US 341 south / SR 27 east (Bay Street) / SR 25 Conn. endsNorthern end of SR 25 Conn. concurrency; southern end of US 341/SR 27 concurrency; northern terminus of SR 25 Conn.
see US 341
WayneJesup39.964.2      US 341 north / SR 27 west (Cherry Street) / US 301 south / SR 23 south – Downtown Jesup, Baxley, Nahunta, AirportNorthern end of US 341/SR 27 concurrency; southern end of US 301/SR 23 concurrency
42.468.2   US 84 west / SR 38 west – Business DistrictSouthern end of US 84/SR 38 concurrency; interchange; no northbound exit
Altamaha River45.673.4Dr. J. Alvin Leaphart Sr. Memorial Bridge
LongLudowici52.183.8     US 84 east / SR 38 east / SR 57 south (McDonald Street) to I-95 – Hinesville, Darien, Ludowici Well Pavilion Historic SiteNorthern end of US 84/SR 38 concurrency; southern end of SR 57 concurrency
Tattnall71.3114.7  SR 196 east – HinesvilleWestern terminus of SR 196
Glennville73.1117.6    SR 23 north / SR 57 north / SR 144 (Barnard Street) – Reidsville, Baxley, Fort Stewart, Gordonia-Alatamaha State Park & Golf CourseNorthern end of SR 23 and SR 57 concurrencies; southern end of SR 73 concurrency; southern terminus of SR 73
EvansClaxton88.8142.9    US 280 / SR 30 / SR 129 (Main Street) – Reidsville, Metter, Pembroke
90.6145.8Claxton Bridge over Canoochee River
95.2153.2  SR 169 south – BellvilleNorthern terminus of SR 169
Bulloch99.4160.0  I-16 (SR 404) – Macon, SavannahI-16 exit 116
103166  SR 46 – Metter, Savannah
Statesboro109175      US 25 Byp. north / US 301 Byp. north / SR 67 Byp. / SR 73 Byp. north (Veterans Memorial Parkway) – Millen, Paulson Stadium, Sylvania, AirportSouthern terminus of US 25 Byp. and US 301 Byp./SR 73 Byp.
110180  SR 67 south (Fair Road) – Pembroke, Hinesville, Fort StewartSouthern end of SR 67 concurrency
112180      US 80 east / SR 26 east (Northside Drive) / US 301 north / SR 73 north (North Main Street) – Sylvania, Savannah, AirportNorthern end of US 301 and SR 73 concurrencies; southern end of US 80/SR 26 concurrency
114183   US 25 Byp. south / SR 67 Byp. south (Veterans Memorial Parkway) – Claxton, Ogeechee Technical CollegeNorthern terminus of US 25 Byp./SR 67 Byp.
Hopeulikit118190   US 80 west / SR 26 west – Portal, Twin City, Swainsboro, George L. Smith State Parknorth end of US 80/SR 26 concurrency
Jenkins135217  SR 121 south – MetterSouthern end of SR 121 concurrency
137220  SR 23 south – GarfieldSouthern end of SR 23 concurrency
Millen139224  SR 17 Byp. east (South Gray Street) – ScarboroSouthern end of SR 17 Byp. concurrency
139.6224.7    SR 17 / SR 23 north / SR 67 north (West Winthrope Avenue) – Midville, Rocky Ford, Sardis, SylvaniaNorthern end of SR 17 Byp., SR 23, and SR 67 concurrencies; northern terminus of SR 17 Byp.
141.2227.2  SR 21 south – SylvaniaNorthern terminus of SR 21
Burke157.5253.5   US 25 Byp. north / SR 121 Byp. north (Burke Veterans Parkway) – WaynesboroSouthern terminus of US 25 Byp./SR 121 Byp.
158.3254.8   US 25 Byp. / SR 121 Byp. (Burke Veterans Parkway) – Millen, AugustaInterchange
Waynesboro159.3256.4  SR 24 east – Sardis, SylvaniaSouthern end of SR 24 concurrency
160.3258.0    SR 24 west / SR 56 / SR 80 (Sixth / Peace Street) – Vidette, Louisville, Swainsboro, Midville, McBean, Wrens, Plant VogtleNorthern end of SR 24 concurrency
161.4259.7   US 25 Byp. south / SR 121 Byp. south (Burke Veterans Parkway)Northern terminus of US 25 Byp./SR 121 Byp.
RichmondAugustaHephzibah line176.9284.7  SR 88 west – Hephzibah, WrensEastern terminus of SR 88
Augusta183.1294.7   I-520 (Bobby Jones Expressway / SR 415) to I-20 – Columbia, AtlantaI-520 exit 7
185.4298.4  SR 56 south (Mike Padgett Highway)Northern terminus of SR 56
185.6298.7     US 1 south / US 78 west / US 278 west / SR 10 west (Gordon Highway) – Louisville, Fort Gordon, ThomsonSouthern end of US 1/US 78/US 278 and SR 10 concurrencies; interchange
  Molly Pond Road north / Doug Barnard Parkway south – Augusta Regional AirportSouthern terminus of Molly Pond Road; northern terminus of Doug Barnard Parkway; former SR 56 Spur south
189.7305.3   US 25 Bus. north / SR 28 (Broad Street) – Downtown Augusta, Fort DiscoveryInterchange; southern terminus of US 25 Bus.; ramp serves Bay Street.
190.0305.8        US 1 north / US 25 north / US 78 east / US 278 east / SC 121 north / SR 10 ends / SR 121 ends – ColumbiaSouth Carolina state line (Savannah River bridge); northern end of SR 10 and SR 121 concurrencies; southern end of SC 121 concurrency; eastern terminus of SR 10; northern terminus of SR 121; southern terminus of SC 121
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1929). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Google (April 6, 2014). "Overview map of US 25 (Brunswick to Millen)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 6, 2014.
    Google (April 6, 2014). "Overview map of US 25 (Millen to Augusta)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 6, 2014.
  4. ^ Federal Highway Administration (October 1, 2012). National Highway System: Brunswick, GA (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved April 7, 2014.
  5. ^ a b Federal Highway Administration (November 15, 2013). National Highway System: (Draft) Georgia (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved April 7, 2014.
  6. ^ Federal Highway Administration (November 15, 2013). National Highway System: (Draft) Augusta–Richmond County, GA–SC (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved April 7, 2014.
  7. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1920). System of State Aid Roads as Approved Representing 4800 Miles of State Aid Roads Outside the Limits of the Incorporated Towns (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  8. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1921). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  9. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1926). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  10. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (February 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  11. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  12. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (May 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  13. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (November 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  14. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (May 1933). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  15. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (June 1933). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  16. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1933). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  17. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (August 1933). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  18. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1934). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  19. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1935). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  20. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1935). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  21. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1936). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  22. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1936). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  23. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1936). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  24. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  25. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  26. ^ Georgia State Highway Board (August 1, 1938). State Highway System of Georgia (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 4, 2016. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  27. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (September 1, 1938). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  28. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1939). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  29. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1941). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  30. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1941). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  31. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1942). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  32. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1943). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  33. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1944). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  34. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1945). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  35. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1946). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015. (Corrected to November 7, 1946.)
  36. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1948). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015. (Corrected to February 28, 1948.)
  37. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1952). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015. (Corrected to January 1, 1952.)
  38. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1953). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015. (Corrected to September 1, 1953.)
  39. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1954). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015. (Corrected to June 1, 1954.)
  40. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1955). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015. (Corrected to June 1, 1955.)
  41. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1957). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015. (Corrected to July 1, 1957.)
  42. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1960). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map) (1960–1961 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015. (Corrected to June 1, 1960.)
  43. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1960). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map) (1960–1961 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015. (Corrected to June 1, 1960.)
  44. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1963). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved August 11, 2015. (Corrected to June 1, 1963.)
  45. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1966). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  46. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1980). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1980–1981 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  47. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1982). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  48. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1984). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1984–1985 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  49. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1986). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1986–1987 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved August 11, 2015.

External linksEdit