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Emilia (Emilian: Emîlia) is a historic region of northern Italy, which approximately corresponds to the western and north-eastern portions of the modern region Emilia-Romagna, with the area of Romagna forming the remainder of the modern region.

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EtymologyEdit

It takes its name from the Via Aemilia, a Roman road constructed by the consul Marcus Aemilius Lepidus in 187 BCE to connect Rimini with Piacenza.

BoundariesEdit

The eastern boundary is formed by the rivers Sillaro and Reno, which divide it from Romagna. To the north the river Po forms its border with Veneto and Lombardy. To the west and south the Apennine drainage divide separates it from Liguria and Tuscany. Administratively it comprises the provinces of Piacenza, Parma, Reggio Emilia, Modena, Bologna (except for the commune of Imola and Dozza, and the valley of the Santerno) and Ferrara.

The region corresponds approximately to the ancient Cispadane Gaul which, under the Augustan territorial organisation of Italia c. 7 CE, became Regio VIII Aemilia.

LanguageEdit

Although Italian is the most widely spoken language today, the local Emilian dialect is also spoken.

External linksEdit

  • "Emilia" . Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). 1911.

Coordinates: 44°45′N 11°00′E / 44.750°N 11.000°E / 44.750; 11.000