District of Columbia statistical areas

Map of the OMB-designated Washington-Baltimore-Arlington, DC-MD-VA-WV-PA Combined Statistical Area (2012)

The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs),[1] the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs),[2] and the combined statistical areas (CSAs)[3] currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

Most recently on March 6, 2020, the Office of Management and Budget defined 1114 statistical areas for the United States,[4] including one combined statistical area and one metropolitan statistical area in the District of Columbia. The district has no counties or other legal subdivisions. The table below shows the recent population of these statistical areas.

TableEdit

The table below describes the two United States statistical areas of the District of Columbia with the following information:[5]

  1. The combined statistical area (CSA) as designated by the OMB.[4]
  2. The CSA population according to 2019 US Census Bureau population estimates.[6]
  3. The core based statistical area (CBSA)[7] as designated by the OMB.[4]
  4. The CBSA population according to 2019 US Census Bureau population estimates [6]
  5. The county name
  6. The county population according to 2019 US Census Bureau population estimates [6]
  7. The Metropolitan Division name, if applicable[4]
  8. The Metropolitan Division population according to 2019 US Census Bureau population estimates [6]
The two United States statistical areas of the District of Columbia

Combined Statistical Area 2019 Population Core Based Statistical Area 2019 Population County 2019 Population Metropolitan Division 2019 Population
Washington-Baltimore-Arlington, DC-MD-VA-WV-PA CSA 9,814,928
705,749
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV MSA 6,280,487
705,749
Fairfax County, Virginia 1,147,532 Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV MD 4,970,252
705,749
Prince George's County, Maryland 909,327
District of Columbia 705,749
Prince William County, Virginia 470,335
Loudoun County, Virginia 413,538
Arlington County, Virginia 236,842
Charles County, Maryland 163,257
City of Alexandria, Virginia 159,428
Stafford County, Virginia 152,882
Spotsylvania County, Virginia 136,215
Calvert County, Maryland 92,525
Fauquier County, Virginia 71,222
Jefferson County, West Virginia 57,146
Culpeper County, Virginia 52,605
City of Manassas, Virginia 41,085
Warren County, Virginia 40,164
City of Fredericksburg, Virginia 29,036
City of Fairfax, Virginia 24,019
City of Manassas Park, Virginia 17,478
Clarke County, Virginia 14,619
City of Falls Church, Virginia 14,617
Madison County, Virginia 13,261
Rappahannock County, Virginia 7,370
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,050,688 Frederick-Gaithersburg-Rockville, MD MD 1,310,235
Frederick County, Maryland 259,547
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, MD MSA 2,800,053 Baltimore County, Maryland 827,370 none
Baltimore City, Maryland 593,490
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 579,234
Howard County, Maryland 325,690
Harford County, Maryland 255,441
Carroll County, Maryland 168,447
Queen Anne's County, Maryland 50,381
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, MD-WV MSA 288,104 Washington County, Maryland 151,049
Berkeley County, West Virginia 119,171
Morgan County, West Virginia 17,884
Chambersburg-Waynesboro, PA MSA 155,027 Franklin County, Pennsylvania 155,027
Winchester, VA-WV MSA 140,566 Frederick County, Virginia 89,313
City of Winchester, Virginia 28,078
Hampshire County, West Virginia 23,175
California–Lexington Park, MD μSA 113,510 St. Mary's County, Maryland 113,510
Easton, MD μSA 37,181 Talbot County, Maryland 36,968
District of Columbia 705,749

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) as a core based statistical area having at least one urbanized area of 50,000 or more population, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured by commuting ties.
  2. ^ The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines a micropolitan statistical area (μSA) as a core based statistical area having at least one urban cluster of at least 10,000 but less than 50,000 population, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured by commuting ties.
  3. ^ The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines a combined statistical area (CSA) as an aggregate of adjacent core based statistical areas that are linked by commuting ties.
  4. ^ a b c d OMB BULLETIN NO. 20-01: Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas Archived 2020-04-20 at the Wayback Machine. Office of Management and Budget. March 6, 2020.
  5. ^ An area in a nearby state and its population are displayed in green. An area that extends into nearby states is displayed in teal. A teal population number over a black population number show the total population versus the District population.
  6. ^ a b c d "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties in the United States: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019". United States Census Bureau, Population Division. April 2020. Archived from the original on April 9, 2020. Retrieved April 9, 2020.
  7. ^ The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines a core based statistical area as one or more adjacent counties or county-equivalents having at least one urban cluster of at least 10,000 population, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured by commuting ties. The core based statistical areas comprise the metropolitan statistical areas and the micropolitan statistical areas.

External linksEdit