Dinamo Riga (original)

Dinamo Riga (Latvian: Rīgas Dinamo) was a Soviet ice hockey club, based in Riga, Latvia. It was founded in 1946 and disestablished in 1995 as Pārdaugava Rīga. In 1949 to 1963 Dinamo Riga was joined with Daugava sports society which was sponsored by Riga's factories VEF and then RVR.

Dinamo Riga
Rīgas Dinamo.png
CityRiga, Latvia
LeagueSCL (1978–1992)
IHL (1992–1995)
Founded1946
Folded1995
Home arenaRīgas Sporta pils
ColorsRed, white, blue
     
Franchise history
Dinamo Riga1946–1949
Daugava Riga1949–1967
Dinamo Riga1967–1991
Stars Rīga1991–1992
Pārdaugava Rīga1993–1995

History of Dinamo RigaEdit

Dinamo Riga was established in 1946, after the re-occupation of Latvia by the Soviet Union.[1] It was a part of Dynamo sports society sponsored by the Soviet Ministry of Interior and the national security structures including the KGB. The club was one of the 12 teams which participated in the first Soviet championship in the 1946–47 season.[1] The team's first official game was a victory 5–1 against Dinamo Tallinn on December 1946.[1] The first season was considered as a success, as the team finished the tournament in fourth place.[2] The club's first roster mainly consisted from the players of the interwar Latvian national team.[1]

At first the club had no permanent place, where the home games were held, but since the 1950–51 season, Dinamo started to play home games at Daugava Stadium,[3] but the games still were played on a natural ice rink and the go ahead of the games depended on suitable weather,[3] The situation did not change until the 1960–61 season, when the stadium was heavily reconstructed.[3]

Dinamo Riga changed its name to Daugava Riga before the start of the 1949–50 season, and kept it for a decade, before the team changed its name again.[4] In the mid-fifties, the core of the team - players, which started their careers before the Second World War, started to retire,[5] and the team started to slip further down the table as the years went by.[5]

The club again changed its name and since the 1958–59 season and now was known as RVR Riga,[6] but the name did not last long as the club two years later was renamed once again to Daugava (RVR).[7] The name changes did not help the team's cause and the club slipped to the third division.[8] During the sixties, the club adopted a new player and staff recruiting policy, switching from local talent developing to gathering players from all corners of Soviet Union and even abroad.[5] The club again changed owners and the name of Dinamo Riga was restored before the 1967–68 season,[9] which ended as the worst season in the club's entire history.[8]

In the 1987–88 season, Dinamo Riga had their best finish, losing to CSKA Moscow in the final.

In 1975, Viktor Khatulev of Dinamo Rīga became the first ice hockey player from the Soviet Union drafted by the National Hockey League. He never had a chance to play for the NHL, as Soviet players were not allowed to play for foreign teams. In season 1976–77, Dinamo Rīga star Helmuts Balderis was the leading scorer, had the most goals, and won the best player of the season award (MVP). He was also the goal leader in 1975–76 and the leading scorer in 1983. He scored 333 goals in his Soviet Union League career.

After the end of Soviet Union, the team continued to play until 1995 as a member of the International Hockey League, the successor of the Soviet Hockey League. During this period, the team was called Stars Rīga and later, Pārdaugava Rīga. It was the former team of the Aleksey Nikiforov, coach of many future NHLers.

As of April 7, 2008, the club has been re-established as a member of the Kontinental Hockey League. See Dinamo Riga.

Super SeriesEdit

Dinamo Riga has also participated in the Super Series in exhibition games against NHL teams in year 1989 and 1990. Dinamo Riga Super Series record:

Super Series game log

Legend:   Win   Loss   Tie

Season-by-season recordEdit

Note: GP = Games played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, Pts = Points, GF = Goals for, GA = Goals against, PIM = Penalties in minutes

Season GP W L T Pts GF GA Finish Playoffs
1978–79 44 19 18 7 45 150 132 6th Not held
1979–80 44 16 24 4 36 134 162 8th Not held
1980–81 49 22 21 6 50 163 157 5th Not held
1981–82 56 17 33 6 40 202 234 8th Not held
1982–83 56 27 24 5 59 240 212 5th Not held
1983–84 44 17 19 8 42 146 172 8th Not held
1984–85 52 18 25 9 45 170 196 7th Not held
1985–86 40 19 15 6 44 138 128 5th Not held
1986–87 40 14 21 5 33 117 132 7th Not held
1987–88 18 11 3 4 25 66 46 3rd Lost in Final
1988–89 44 18 20 6 42 115 131 6th Not held
1989–90 48 26 15 7 59 148 117 5th Not held
1990–91 46 25 16 5 55 187 138 5th Not held

Notes:

  • The player statistics for the 1987–88 season are the total for both stages.
  • Soviet league had no playoffs, except for the 1987–88 season.

Notable playersEdit

IIHF Hall of FameEdit

Players
Builders

List of Dynamo Riga players selected in the NHL Amateur DraftEdit

List of Dynamo Riga players selected in the NHL Entry DraftEdit

Stanley Cup winnersEdit

Players

Olympic championsEdit

Players

World championsEdit

Players

World Junior championsEdit

Players

Head coachesEdit

  • Jānis Dobelis, 1946–1949
  • Edgars Klāvs, 1949–1961
  • Anatolijs Jegorovs, 1961–1962
  • Georgijs Firsovs, 1962–1963
  • Staņislavs Motls, 1967–1968
  • Viktor Tikhonov, 1968–1977
  • Ēvalds Grabovskis, 1977–1980
  • Vladimir Yurzinov, 1980–1989
  • Ēvalds Grabovskis, 1989–1991
  • Jevgeņijs Banovs, 1992
  • Juris Reps, 1992–1994
  • Mihails Beskašnovs, 1994–1995
  • Leonīds Beresņevs, 1995

Awards and trophiesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

General
  • Ulmanis, Aivis (1998). Melnās ripas bruņinieki: Latvijas hokeja vēsture. Latvijas Hokeja federācija. ISBN 9984-19-017-X.
Specific
  1. ^ a b c d Ulmanis. Melnās ripas bruņinieki: Latvijas hokeja vēsture. p. 74.
  2. ^ Ulmanis. Melnās ripas bruņinieki: Latvijas hokeja vēsture. p. 76.
  3. ^ a b c Ulmanis. Melnās ripas bruņinieki: Latvijas hokeja vēsture. p. 434.
  4. ^ Ulmanis. Melnās ripas bruņinieki: Latvijas hokeja vēsture. p. 89.
  5. ^ a b c Ulmanis. Melnās ripas bruņinieki: Latvijas hokeja vēsture. p. 539.
  6. ^ Ulmanis. Melnās ripas bruņinieki: Latvijas hokeja vēsture. p. 130.
  7. ^ Ulmanis. Melnās ripas bruņinieki: Latvijas hokeja vēsture. p. 139.
  8. ^ a b Ulmanis. Melnās ripas bruņinieki: Latvijas hokeja vēsture. p. 185.
  9. ^ Ulmanis. Melnās ripas bruņinieki: Latvijas hokeja vēsture. p. 182.
  10. ^ "Суперсерия - 1989 Игра №2 "Калгари Флеймз" - "Динамо" Рига - 2:2". hockeyarchives.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 7 September 2018.
  11. ^ "Суперсерия - 1989 Игра №3 "Эдмонтон Ойлерс" - "Динамо" Рига - 2:1". hockeyarchives.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 7 September 2018.
  12. ^ "Суперсерия - 1989 Игра №5 "Ванкувер Канукс" - "Динамо" Рига - 6:1". hockeyarchives.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 7 September 2018.
  13. ^ "Суперсерия - 1989 Игра №7 "Лос-Анджелес Кингз" - "Динамо" Рига - 3:5". hockeyarchives.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 7 September 2018.
  14. ^ "Суперсерия - 1989 Игра №10 "Чикаго Блэк Хоукс" - "Динамо" Рига - 4:1". hockeyarchives.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 7 September 2018.
  15. ^ "Суперсерия - 1989 Игра №11 "Сент-Луис Блюз" - "Динамо" Рига - 5:0". hockeyarchives.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 7 September 2018.
  16. ^ "Суперсерия - 1989 Игра №13 "Миннесота Норд Старз" - "Динамо" Рига - 1:2". hockeyarchives.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 7 September 2018.
  17. ^ "Суперсерия - 1989-1990 Игра №6 "Динамо" Рига - "Вашингтон Кэпиталз" - 1:2". hockeyarchives.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 7 September 2018.
  18. ^ "Суперсерия - 1990-1991 Игра №3 "Динамо" Рига - "Монреаль Канадиенс" - 2:4". hockeyarchives.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 7 September 2018.