Daniel Petrie Jr.

  (Redirected from Daniel Petrie, Jr.)

Daniel Mannix Petrie Jr. (born November 30, 1951)[1] is a Canadian-American[2] producer, writer, and director of film and television.[3] He is best known for pioneering the sub-genres of action comedy and buddy cop films[4] through films like Beverly Hills Cop and Turner & Hooch.[5] He served as President of the Writers Guild of America, West between 1997 and 1999, and then again between 2004 and 2005.[6]

Daniel Petrie Jr.
Born
Daniel Mannix Petrie Jr.

(1951-11-30) November 30, 1951 (age 69)
Canada
Nationality
  • Canadian
  • American
OccupationFilm producer
Screenwriter
Film director
Years active1984–present
OrganizationWriters Guild of America, West
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
Director's Guild of America
Director's Guild of Canada
Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television
Parent(s)Daniel Petrie
Dorothea G. Petrie
RelativesDonald Petrie
AwardsWGA Morgan Cox Award

Life and careerEdit

Petrie was born in Canada to Daniel Petrie Sr., a film director, and Dorothea, a producer, novelist, and actress. He attended Northfield Mount Hermon School and the University of Redlands, earning degrees in psychology and creative writing.[7] Originally a literary agent, he followed in his father's footsteps and joined the film industry as a screenwriter. His debut screenplay, Beverly Hills Cop, was the result of numerous rewrites and several radically different iterations over the course of a decade.[8] At one point, the film was a serious action film starring Sylvester Stallone,[9] a project that Stallone later took with him and developed into Cobra. Despite the troubled production history, the film was a massive critical and financial success, grossing over $300 million worldwide from a $15 million budget[10] and earning rave reviews from critics like Janet Maslin[11] and Richard Schickel.[12] In spite of much of the film's comedy having been improvised by the actors,[13] Petrie's contributions earned him accolades in the form of Academy Award and Edgar Award nominations.

Petrie wrote a number of well-known and well-received films throughout the 1980s and 1990s, including the off-beat crime thriller The Big Easy starring Dennis Quaid and Ellen Barkin. He wrote two films for director Roger Spottiswoode, the 1988 thriller film Shoot to Kill and the Tom Hanks comedy Turner & Hooch, and produced a third; The 6th Day. Much of his work falls under the umbrella of crime fiction. He made his directorial debut with Toy Soldiers, a 1991 action film revolving around a group of teenagers fighting terrorists that have taken over their prep school. He served as the creator and executive producer of Combat Hospital, a television war drama series produced in his native Canada.

In addition to his creative pursuits, Petrie has been active in various entertainment industry organizations. He served as Vice President, and later President, of the Writers Guild of America, West, and currently sits on its Board of Trustees. He also served as a member of the Board of Trustees for the American Film Institute; a member of the Board of Governors for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; and as a member of the Board of Advisers of the Austin Film Festival and Screenwriting Conference.[14] He is co-founder of Enderby Entertainment,[15] an independent film finance and production company.[16]

FilmographyEdit

FilmEdit

Year Title Director Producer Screenwriter Cameo Notes
1984 Beverly Hills Cop No No Yes No
1986 The Big Easy No No Yes No
1988 Shoot to Kill No Yes Yes No
1989 Turner & Hooch No Executive Yes No
1991 Toy Soldiers Yes No Yes No Directorial Debut
1992 The Distinguished Gentleman No No No Yes Cameo as "Asbestos Lobbyist"
1994 In the Army Now Yes No Yes Yes Cameo as "Lieutenant Colonel"
Kangaroo Court No Executive No No Short film
2000 The 6th Day No Executive No No
2013 No Tell Motel No Executive No No
A Haunting at Silver Falls No Executive No No
Blood Shed No Executive No No
2014 Dawn Patrol Yes Yes No No
2015 Blackway No Executive No No
Rosemont Yes Yes No No
2017 An Ordinary Man No Executive No No
2018 Intrigo: Death of an Author No Executive No No
2019 A Haunting at Silver Falls 2 No Executive No No
Intrigo: Dear Agnes No Executive No No
Intrigo: Samaria No Executive No No
TBA Zero Contact No Executive No No
Fire Watch No Executive No No

Also credited as "Characters" in Beverly Hills Cop sequels.

TelevisionEdit

Year Title Director Executive
Producer
Screenwriter Cameo Notes
1990 Turner & Hooch No Yes No No Television film
1995 Stick with Me, Kid No Yes No No 10 episodes
1996 Toe Tags Yes No No No Television film
1996-1997 The Big Easy No Yes No No 23 episodes
1997 Dead Silence Yes No No Yes Cameo as "Slaughterhouse Trooper"; television film
2002 Framed Yes No Yes No Television film
2007 Pictures of Hollis Woods No No Yes No Television film
2011 Combat Hospital No Yes Yes No Creator and producer in 13 episodes; writer in 2 episodes

Personal lifeEdit

Petrie's father Daniel Petrie was also a film director, and his brother Donald is an actor and director. His family was awarded an AFI Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001.[17] He currently resides in Los Angeles, California, and holds dual US-Canadian citizenship.[18] He is a member of the Writers Guild of America, Directors Guild of America, SAG-AFTRA, Writers Guild of Canada, Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television, and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.[19]

Awards and nominationsEdit

1984 Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay: Beverly Hills Cop (nomination) - with Danilo Bach

1984 Edgar Award for Best Motion Picture: Beverly Hills Cop (nomination)

1988 Edgar Award for Best Motion Picture: Shoot to Kill (nomination)

2008 Humanitas Prize in 90 Minute Category: Pictures of Hollis Woods (nomination) - with Ann Peacock and Camille Thomasson

2013 WGA Morgan Cox Award (won)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Daniel Petrie jr. - Biografie. Sat.1. Retrieved February 4, 2012.
  2. ^ https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniel-petrie-jr-136a2022. Missing or empty |title= (help)[dead link]
  3. ^ Staff, Hollywood.com (2015-02-03). "Daniel Petrie Jr. | Biography and Filmography | 1951". Hollywood.com. Retrieved 2017-08-27.
  4. ^ "6 Ways 'Beverly Hills Cop' Changed Comedy Forever". Esquire. 2014-12-05. Retrieved 2017-08-27.
  5. ^ "Daniel Petrie Jr interview: Toy Soldiers, Dawn Patrol, Turner & Hooch". Den of Geek. Retrieved 2017-08-27.
  6. ^ "Daniel Petrie Jr". Retrieved 2017-08-27.
  7. ^ https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniel-petrie-jr-136a2022. Missing or empty |title= (help)[dead link]
  8. ^ "Daniel Petrie Jr interview: Toy Soldiers, Dawn Patrol, Turner & Hooch". Den of Geek. Retrieved 2017-08-27.
  9. ^ "Why Sylvester Stallone's Beverly Hills Cop Movie Never Happened". CINEMABLEND. 2016-08-11. Retrieved 2017-08-27.
  10. ^ "Beverly Hills Cop (1984) - Box Office Mojo". www.boxofficemojo.com. Retrieved 2017-08-27.
  11. ^ Maslin, Janet (2012-10-03). "Movie Review - Beverly Hills Cop - FILM: MURPHY IN 'BEVERLY HILLS COP' - NYTimes.com". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 2012-10-03. Retrieved 2017-08-27.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  12. ^ Schickel, Richard (1984-12-10). "Cinema: Eddie Goes to Lotusland". Time. ISSN 0040-781X. Retrieved 2017-08-27.
  13. ^ "15 Things You May Not Have Known About Beverly Hills Cop". 2015-10-12. Retrieved 2017-08-27.
  14. ^ "Daniel Petrie Jr". LinkedIn. Retrieved 26 February 2017.
  15. ^ "Daniel Petrie Jr To Receive WGA West's Morgan Cox Award For Guild Service". Deadline.com. 20 December 2012. Retrieved 13 August 2015.
  16. ^ "Company". Enderby Entertainment. Archived from the original on 2017-08-27. Retrieved 2017-08-27.
  17. ^ "Daniel Petrie Jr". IMDb. Retrieved 26 February 2017.
  18. ^ https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniel-petrie-jr-136a2022. Missing or empty |title= (help)[dead link]
  19. ^ "Leadership". Enderby Entertainment. Retrieved 2017-08-27.

External linksEdit