Complex systems biology

Complex systems biology (CSB) is a branch or subfield of mathematical and theoretical biology invented by Robert Rosen concerned with complexity of both structure and function in biological organisms, as well as the emergence and evolution of organisms and species, with emphasis being placed on the interconnectivity of, and within, biological network inference,[1][2][3] and on modelling the fundamental relations inherent to life.[4]

According to Baianu et al. CSB is a field that has only a partial overlap with the more conventional concepts of complex systems theory and systems biology, because CSB is concerned with philosophy and human consciousness. Moreover, mathematics can model a wide range of complex systems, but this is claimed not to be relevant.[5]

Network Representation of a Complex Adaptive System

Complexity of organisms and biosphereEdit

There is no satisfying definition of complexity in biology.[6][7]

According to Rosen, most complex system models are not about biological subjects, such as genomes and organisms,[3][8] although biology has been successfully modelled since the 19th century.[9][10]

Two approaches based on information theory and network topology/graph theory have been combined to model human consciousness.[5][11]

Regarding ontology (the philosophical metaphysics of reality), one is assuming that there is a hierarchy of complexity levels of organization distinct from reality.[5][12][13]

Baianu et al. claim that taxonomic ranks such as order, family, genus, species, etc. reflect a hierarchy of complexity levels of organization in biology.[5]

Because of their variability, ability to heal and self-reproduce, and so on, organisms are defined as 'meta-systems' of simpler systems in CSB.[5][14] A meta-system is a system of systems.[14] Autopoiesis also models such a biological system of systems,[15] however, Baianu et al. claim that in biology a meta-system is not equivalent to such a system of systems.[5] They also claim it differs from the meta-system defined in a blog by Kent D. Palmer[16][17] because organisms are different from machines or robots.[5] If, according to Hopcroft et al., robots or automata can be defined by five qualities: states, startup state, input and output sets/alphabet and transition function,[18] organisms are different.[5]

Topics in complex systems biologyEdit

 
a complex signal transduction pathway

The following is a list of topics covered in complex systems biology:

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Donald Snooks, Graeme, "A general theory of complex living systems: Exploring the demand side of dynamics", Complexity, vol. 13, no. 6, July/August 2008.
  2. ^ Baianu, I. C. (2006). "Robert Rosen's Work and Complex Systems Biology". Axiomathes. 16 (1–2): 25–34. doi:10.1007/s10516-005-4204-z. S2CID 4673166.
  3. ^ a b Rosen, R. (1958b). "The Representation of Biological Systems from the Standpoint of the Theory of Categories". Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics. 20 (4): 317–341. doi:10.1007/bf02477890.
  4. ^ a b Rosen, R. (1958a). "A Relational Theory of Biological Systems". Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics. 20 (3): 245–260. doi:10.1007/bf02478302.
  5. ^ Bonner, J. T. 1988. The Evolution of Complexity by Means of Natural Selection. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  6. ^ Heylighen, Francis (2008). "Complexity and Self-Organization". In Bates, Marcia J.; Maack, Mary Niles. Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences. CRC. ISBN 978-0-8493-9712-7
  7. ^ ^ Heylighen, Francis (2008). "Complexity and Self-Organization". In Bates, Marcia J.; Maack, Mary Niles. Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences. CRC. ISBN 978-0-8493-9712-7
  8. ^ Thompson, D'Arcy W., 1992. On Growth and Form. Dover reprint of 1942, 2nd ed. (1st ed., 1917). ISBN 0-486-67135-6
  9. ^ "abstract relational biology (ARB)". PlanetPhysics. Retrieved 2010-03-17.
  10. ^ http://hdl.handle.net/10101/npre.2011.6115.1 Wallace, Rodrick. When Spandrels Become Arches: Neural crosstalk and the evolution of consciousness. Available from Nature Precedings (2011)
  11. ^ Poli R (2001a). "The Basic Problem of the Theory of Levels of Reality". Axiomathes. 12 (3–4): 261–283. doi:10.1023/A:1015845217681. S2CID 55743057.
  12. ^ Poli R (1998). "Levels". Axiomathes. 9 (1–2): 197–211. doi:10.1007/bf02681712. PMID 8053082.
  13. ^ a b Metasystem Transition Theory, Valentin Turchin, Cliff Joslyn, 1993-1997
  14. ^ Reflexive Autopoietic Systems Theory
  15. ^ Meta-system Engineering, Kent D. Palmer, 1996
  16. ^ Hoff, M.A., Roggia, K.G., Menezes, P.B.:(2004). Composition of Transformations: A Framework for Systems with Dynamic Topology. International Journal of Computing Anticipatory System's 14:259–270
  17. ^ John E. Hopcroft, Rajeev Motwani, Jeffrey D. Ullman.2000. Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages, and Computation (2nd Edition)Pearson Education. ISBN 0-201-44124-1
  18. ^ Rosen, R. 1960. (1960). "A quantum-theoretic approach to genetic problems". Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics. 22 (3): 227–255. doi:10.1007/BF02478347.
  19. ^ Baianu, I. C.: 2006 (2006). "Robert Rosen's Work and Complex Systems Biology". Axiomathes. 16 (1–2): 25–34. doi:10.1007/s10516-005-4204-z. S2CID 4673166.
  20. ^ Rosen, R.: 1958b (1958). "The Representation of Biological Systems from the Standpoint of the Theory of Categories". Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics. 20 (4): 317–341. doi:10.1007/BF02477890.

References citedEdit

  • Baianu, I. C., Computer Models and Automata Theory in Biology and Medicine., Monograph, Ch.11 in M. Witten (Editor), Mathematical Models in Medicine, vol. 7., Vol. 7: 1513-1577 (1987),Pergamon Press:New York, (updated by Hsiao Chen Lin in 2004 ISBN 0-08-036377-6
  • Renshaw, E., Modelling biological populations in space and time. C.U.P., 1991. ISBN 0-521-44855-7
  • Rosen, Robert.1991, Life Itself: A Comprehensive Inquiry into the Nature, Origin, and Fabrication of Life, Columbia University Press, published posthumously:
  • Rosen, Robert .1970. Dynamical system theory in biology. New York, Wiley-Interscience. ISBN 0-471-73550-7
  • Rosen, Robert. 2000, Essays on Life Itself, Columbia University Press.
  • Rosen, Robert. 2003, "Anticipatory Systems; Philosophical, Mathematical, and Methodolical Foundations", Rosen Enterprises publs.

Further readingEdit