College Sports Information Directors of America

College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) is an organization that focuses on professional development and support for sports information directors at all levels. It offers awards, scholarships, and grants in support of SIDs and prospective SIDs in the industry.[1] Since 1952, CoSIDA has bestowed Academic All-American recognition on male and female athletes in Divisions I, II, and III of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)—covering all NCAA championship sports—and NAIA athletes.[2]

College Sports Information Directors of America
CoSIDA Sponsor banner.jpg
College Sports Information Directors of America logo
AbbreviationCoSIDA
Formation1957
AffiliationsNational Collegiate Athletic Association, ESPN The Magazine
Staff
4 [Doug Vance, Executive Director]
Websitecosida.com
Academic All-American teams were marketed as "All-American Team Presented by ESPN The Magazine as selected by CoSIDA" until Fall 2010.

HistoryEdit

CoSIDA began as a part of the American College Public Relations Association (ACPRA). It split and was established as a separate organization for sports information directors in 1957. CoSIDA holds an annual conference based around professional development. The first conference was held in Chicago in 1957, where there were 102 attendees.[3] As of 2019 there are over 3,100 members in the United States and Canada.[4]

In 2008, CoSIDA launched a strategic plan to change the image and focus of the organization. Part of the plan was to modify the traditional "Sports Information Director" job title to "Strategic Communicator". Along with this, CoSIDA changed its logo and began to work with the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA).[5] Another key point was to have members get better at effective communication strategy, specifically strategic communication. This change is in response to changes in media technology, namely social media.[6]

CoSIDA's Research on Social MediaEdit

A 2012 study, conducted by G. Clayton Stoldt of Wichita State University, surveyed 529 CoSIDA members on how social media had impacted their institutions.[7] Some key results are:

  • 92% said that social media changed how their institution communicates
  • 89% said social media changed how they handle external communications
  • 81% agreed that social media has in some way enhanced public relations practices
  • 92% said that social media impacts mainstream media
  • 92% also said social media has forced organizations to respond more quickly to crises
  • 69% said that social media is less accurate than traditional media, 72% said social media is less credible than traditional media
  • 75% said that social media impacts organizations' transparency
  • Only 6% knew of any time their institution managed social media based on legality

A separate study in 2016, conducted by CoSIDA and researched by Katelyn Miller of Rutgers University, found that just 33% of institutions had implemented a social media policy and 50% of SIDs had, on at least one occasion, deleted a social media post from a coach or student-athlete.[8]

Academic All-American SelectionsEdit

Since 1952, CoSIDA has selected Academic All-Americans for NCAA Division I, NCAA Division II, NCAA Division III and NAIA. In 2018-19, two-year schools and Canadian institutions were made eligible for at-large All-American selections. Google Cloud is the title sponsor for the All-American selections. Previous title sponsors include GTE, Verizon, ESPN The Magazine, and Capital One.[9]

CoSIDA is responsible for the annual selection of 816 Academic All-Americans in men's soccer, football, basketball, baseball and track and field/cross country and women's soccer, volleyball, basketball, softball, and track and field/cross country. The sports that CoSIDA recognizes as eligible for at-large Academic All-American recognition are:

Men's Sports Women's Sports
Fencing Bowling
Golf Crew
Gymnastics Fencing
Ice Hockey Field Hockey
Lacrosse Golf
Rifle Gymnastics
Skiing Ice Hockey
Swimming Lacrosse
Tennis Rifle
Volleyball Skiing
Water Polo Swimming
Wrestling Tennis
Water Polo

Dick Enberg Award WinnersEdit

The organization presents the annual Dick Enberg Award to a "person whose actions and commitment have furthered the meaning and reach of the Academic All-America Teams Program and/or the student athlete while promoting the values of education and academics." Frank Beamer has been selected as the 2019 recipient.[10]

PresidentsEdit

The following is a listing of past presidents:[11]

  • 2018-19: Rob Knox, Towson
  • 2017-18: Rob Carolla, College Football 150
  • 2016-17: Andy Seely, Central Florida
  • 2015-16: Judy Willson, Mountain West Conference
  • 2014-15: Eric McDowell, Union College (N.Y.)
  • 2013-14: Shelly Poe, Auburn
  • 2012-13: Joe Hornstein, FIU
  • 2011-12: Tom Di Camillo, Pacific West Conference & Central Arizona College
  • 2010-11: Larry Dougherty, Temple
  • 2009-10: Justin Doherty, Wisconsin
  • 2008-09: Nick Joos, Baylor
  • 2007-08: Charles Bloom, Southeastern Conference
  • 2006-07: Doug Dull, Maryland
  • 2005-06: Joe Hernandez, Ball State
  • 2004-05: Rod Commons, Washington State
  • 2003-04: Tammy Boclair, Vanderbilt
  • 2002-03: Alan Cannon, Texas A&M
  • 2001-02: Pete Moore, Syracuse
  • 2000-01: Fred Stabley Jr., Central Michigan
  • 1999-00: Max Corbet, Boise State
  • 1998-99: Maxey Parrish, Baylor
  • 1997-98: Pete Kowalski, Rutgers
  • 1996-97: Jim Vruggink, Purdue
  • 1995-96: Rick Brewer, North Carolina
  • 1994-95: Hal Cowan, Oregon State
  • 1993-94: Doug Vance, Kansas
  • 1992-93: Ed Carpenter, Boston University
  • 1991-92: George Wine, Iowa
  • 1990-91: June Stewart, Vanderbilt
  • 1989-90: Arnie Sgalio, Big Sky Conference
  • 1988-89: Bill Little, Texas
  • 1987-88: Bob Smith, Rutgers
  • 1986-87: Roger Valdiserri, Notre Dame
  • 1985-86: Jack Zane, Maryland
  • 1984-85: Nordy Jenson, Western Athletic Conference
  • 1983-84: Bill Whitmore, Rice
  • 1982-83: Howie Davis, Massachusetts
  • 1981-82: Nick Vista, Michigan State
  • 1980-81: Langston Rogers, Delta State
  • 1979-80: Dave Schulthess, Brigham Young
  • 1978-79: Don Bryant, Nebraska
  • 1977-78: Bob Peterson, Minnesota
  • 1976-77: Bill Esposito, St. John’s
  • 1975-76: Bob Bradley, Clemson
  • 1974-75: Hal Bateman, Air Force
  • 1973-74: Jones Ramsey, Texas
  • 1972-73: Jim Mott, Wisconsin
  • 1971-72: Dick Page, Massachusetts
  • 1970-71: Elmore Hudgins, Southeastern Conference
  • 1969-70: Harry Burrell, Iowa State
  • 1968-69: Tom Miller, Indiana
  • 1967-68: Bill Young, Wyoming
  • 1966-67: Marvin Francis, Wake Forest
  • 1965-66: Bob Culp, Western Michigan
  • 1965-66: Val Pinchbeck, Syracuse
  • 1964-65: Harold Keith, Oklahoma
  • 1963-64: Warren Berg, Luther
  • 1962-63: Bob Hartley, Mississippi State
  • 1961-62: John Cox, Navy
  • 1960-61: Marty Reisch, Air Force
  • 1959-60: Wilbur Evans, Southwest Athletic Conference
  • 1958-59: Fred Stabley Sr., Michigan State
  • 1957-58: Ted Mann, Duke

ConventionsEdit

The following is a listing of past and future convention sites, including membership and attendance:[12]

Year Site Membership Convention
2022 Las Vegas -- --
2021 Orlando -- --
2020 Las Vegas -- --
2019 Orlando 3,100+ 975
2018 Washington, D.C. 3,100+ 1062
2017 Orlando 3,100+ 949
2016 Dallas 3,100+ 926
2015 Orlando 3,100+ 884
2014 Orlando 3056 886
2013 Orlando 2954 852
2012 St. Louis 2786 859
2011 Marco Island 2862 727
2010 San Francisco 2497 614
2009 San Antonio 2563 553
2008 Tampa 2397 832
2007 San Diego 2216 920
2006 Nashville 2143 726
2005 Philadelphia 1946 783
2004 Calgary 1961 496
2003 Cleveland 1954 780
2002 Rochester 1888 748
2001 San Diego 1877 1065
2000 St. Louis 1855 980
1999 Orlando 1839 1195
1998 Spokane 1812 609
1997 New Orleans 1825 1060
1996 Boston 1803 1056
1995 Denver 1772 903
1994 Chicago 1804 1030
1993 Atlanta 1810 987
1992 Lexington 1706 989
1991 San Francisco 1669 915
1990 Houston 1627 947
1989 Washington, D.C. 1467 1122
1988 Kansas City 1361 855
1987 Portland 1426 701
1986 Nashville 1360 836
1985 Boston 1341 904
1984 St. Louis 1304 714
1983 San Diego 1170 610
1982 Dallas 1077 651
1981 Philadelphia 984 639
1980 Kansas City 944 495
1979 Chicago 593 458
1978 Atlanta 510 415
1977 Los Angeles 550 312
1976 Cincinnati 671 335
1975 Houston 623 303</tbody>

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "Our Organization". CoSIDA. 2019. Retrieved October 17, 2019.
  2. ^ "Florida's Tim Tebow and Morningside's Beau Kildow top ESPN the Magazine's Academic All-America Football Team". College Sports Information Directors of America. 2009-11-24. Archived from the original on 2017-11-18. Retrieved 2010-02-12.
  3. ^ Stoldt, Clayton (2015). "College Athletics Communications". Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  4. ^ "About Us". CoSIDA. 2019. Retrieved September 29, 2019.
  5. ^ Moore, Joe (2015). "Strategic Influence and Sport Communication Leaders". Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  6. ^ Whiteside, Erin (2014). "New Media and the Changing Role of Sports Information". Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  7. ^ Stoldt, G. Clayton (2012). "The Impact of Social Media on College Athletics Communications" (PDF). CoSIDA. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  8. ^ Miller, Katelyn (2016). "The Impact of Social Media on Intercollegiate Athletics". Rutgers University Libraries. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  9. ^ "Our Organization: What is CoSIDA?". 2019. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  10. ^ "About the Dick Enberg Award". 2019. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  11. ^ "Past Presidents". College Sports Information Directors of America. Retrieved 2016-04-07.
  12. ^ "Convention Sites". College Sports Information Directors of America. Retrieved 2017-01-30.

External linksEdit