Manton, Lincolnshire

  (Redirected from Cleatham)

Manton is a village and civil parish in North Lincolnshire, England. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 123.[1] The village is situated just south from the town of Scunthorpe, and about 6 miles (10 km) south-west from the town of Brigg. The parish includes the hamlet of Cleatham.[2] Cleatham was a civil parish between 1866 and 1936.[3]

Manton
Cleatham Hall - geograph.org.uk - 138491.jpg
Cleatham Hall
Manton is located in Lincolnshire
Manton
Manton
Location within Lincolnshire
Population123 (2011)
OS grid referenceSE932025
• London145 mi (233 km) S
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townGainsborough
Postcode districtDN21
PoliceHumberside
FireHumberside
AmbulanceEast Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Lincolnshire
53°30′40″N 0°35′43″W / 53.511136°N 0.595155°W / 53.511136; -0.595155Coordinates: 53°30′40″N 0°35′43″W / 53.511136°N 0.595155°W / 53.511136; -0.595155
St.Hybald's church, Manton

The parish church is a Grade II listed building dedicated to Saint Hybald. It was built of limestone in 1861 by J. M. Hooker, and Wheeler of Tunbridge Wells.[4]

The church was made redundant by the Diocese of Lincoln in 1998, and it was sold for residential use in 2003.[5] Its parson from 1568 was John Robotham, who was accused of missing evening prayers and even Easter communion in order to play bowls. He had a number of legal battles with parishioners, some of whom he served a summons on during church services.[6]

Cleatham Hall is a Grade II listed house dating from 1855 but with earlier origins.[7]

Cleatham bowl barrow is a Bronze Age scheduled monument located about 200 yards (200 m) to the east of Cleatham Hall.[8]

The last known player of the Lincolnshire bagpipes, John Hunsley, lived in Manton in the mid-1800s.[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Civil parish population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 19 April 2016.
  2. ^ "Manton". A Vision of Britain through Time. University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 11 July 2011.
  3. ^ "Cleatham". A Vision of Britain through Time. University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 11 July 2011.
  4. ^ Historic England. "St Hybald  (Grade II) (1346833)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 11 July 2011.
  5. ^ "Manton". Genuki.org.uk. Retrieved 11 July 2011.
  6. ^ Judith Maltby, Prayer Book and People, p.70
  7. ^ Historic England. "Cleatham House  (Grade II) (1083030)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 11 July 2011.
  8. ^ Historic England. "Cleatham Round Barrow (1007729)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 11 July 2011.
  9. ^ A commentator the 1881 Oxford Journals' Notes and queries, pp.95-96, noted that Hunsley played the pipes until shortly before his death, which occurred "between twenty and thirty years ago."

Further readingEdit

  • Manton in Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire with the Port of Hull and Neighbourhood. With Map of the County. by E. R. Kelly, 1885
  • Leahy, Kevin (July–August 2007). "A warning to the curious: digging an Anglo-Saxon cemetery". Current Archaeology. 18, No.6 (210): 26–31. Article on the excavation of the Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Cleatham, the third largest in England.

External linksEdit