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Chan Peng Soon (born 27 April 1988) is a Malaysian professional badminton player specialised in the mixed doubles event. He is best known for his partnership with Goh Liu Ying where they have been consistently ranked among the top 10 mixed doubles pair in the world. Chan and Goh reached their career high ranking of world No. 3 in 2013 and won the silver medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics.

Chan Peng Soon
Yonex IFB 2013 - Eightfinal - Chan Peng Soon - Goh Liu Ying — Chris Langridge - Heather Olver 37.jpg
Personal information
Born (1988-04-27) 27 April 1988 (age 29)
George Town, Penang, Malaysia
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Weight 68 kg (150 lb)
Handedness Right
Coach Jeremy Gan
Chin Eei Hui
Men's & mixed doubles
Highest ranking 3 (XD) (3 July 2013)
Current ranking 20 (XD) (21 September 2017)
BWF profile
Chan Peng Soon
Traditional Chinese 陳炳順
Simplified Chinese 陈炳顺

Contents

Early and personal lifeEdit

Chan was born on 22 May 1988 in George Town, Penang to Chan Chee Kong and Loo Leng Hua. He has a younger sister, Chan Lay Cheng and a younger brother, Chan Peng Keat.[1] He first started playing badminton at age seven but only began training seriously when he was 12. He only completed Form Three before dropped out of school to concentrated fully on badminton. He joined the national team when he was 18.[2]

Chan is married to Malaysian singer, Ester Cham May May since September 2010.[3] They have a son, Milton Chan and a daughter, Hannah Chan.[4]

CareerEdit

Chan made his international debut in 2006.[5] In July 2009, Chan won his first senior international title with Lim Khim Wah at the Thailand Open by defeating compatriot Choong Tan Fook and Lee Wan Wah in the final.[6] In October 2009, Chan and Goh Liu Ying reached their first international tournament final at the Vietnam Open but were defeated by Flandy Limpele and Cheng Wen-hsing.[7]

In April 2010, they became the country’s first ever mixed doubles champions in a top–flight international tournament after winning the Badminton Asia Championships by defeating South Korean's Yoo Yeon-seong and Kim Min-jung in the final.[8] At the 2010 Commonwealth Games, he won the gold medal in mixed team event. In the mixed doubles event, Chan and Goh lost the bronze medal match to Chayut Triyachart and Yao Lei.

In May 2011, they finish as runner-up to Indonesian pair, Tontowi Ahmad and Lilyana Natsir in the final of the Malaysia Open.[9] In November 2011, they won the Bitburger Open by defeating Denmark's Thomas Laybourn and Kamilla Rytter Juhl.[10]

In March 2012, they reached the semi-finals of All England Open before losing to eventual champion, Tontowi Ahmad and Lilyana Natsir.[11] In the following month, they became the runner-up of Australia Open after losing to Chinese Taipei's Chen Hung-Ling and Cheng Wen-Hsing in the final.[12] They gained their first ever Malaysia Open crown by beating Indonesian pair, Irfan Fadhilah and Weni Anggraini.[13]

Chan and Goh represented Malaysia at the 2012 London Olympics. They were the first ever Malaysian mixed doubles pair to qualify for the Olympics Games.[14] They lost all three group matches and fails to progress to quarter-finals in their Olympics debut. In September 2012, Chan and Goh won their first Super Series title at the Japan Open by beating Muhammad Rijal and Lilyana Natsir.[15] In November 2012, they reached the final of China Open but were defeated by top seed, Xu Chen and Ma Jin in straight sets.

In January 2013, they became the runner-up of Malaysia Open after losing to Joachim Fischer Nielsen and Christinna Pedersen in the final. In January 2014, Lai Pei Jing was chosen as his new partner while Goh went on hiatus to recover from knee surgery.[16] In their first international competition together, Chan and Lai reached the final of Austrian International before losing to Robert Mateusiak and Agnieszka Wojtkowska.[17]

In April 2014, Chan briefly resume his partnership with Goh at the Singapore Open.[18] Chan revive his partnership with Lai after Goh finally decided to undergo surgery on both her knees and will be out of action for the rest of the year.[19] At the 2014 Commonwealth Games, Chan win the gold medal in the mixed team event. In the mixed doubles event, the pair lost the bronze medal match to Robert Blair and Imogen Bankier.

Chan resumed his partnership with Goh in 2015 where they won three titles that year, the Polish Open, Russian Open and the Mexico Open.[20][21] At the 2015 Southeast Asian Games, they won silver after losing to Indonesia's Praveen Jordan and Debby Susanto in the mixed doubles final.[22]

In 2016, they became the runner-up of the inaugural edition of Thailand Masters after losing to unseeded Chinese pair, Zheng Siwei and Chen Qingchen in the final.[23] In March, they clinched their first title of the year by winning the New Zealand Open.[24] In April, they lost to Indonesian pair, Tontowi Ahmad and Lilyana Natsir in the final of the Malaysia Open.[25]

Goh and Chan qualified for 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.[26] They won their first two group stage matches but lost the third to Indonesian pair, Tontowi Ahmad and Liliyana Natsir.[27] They finished as group runner-up and progress to quarter finals round. In the quarter finals, they beat Group B winner, Robert Mateusiak and Nadieżda Zięba of Poland.[28] In the semi-finals, they beat China's Xu Chen and Ma Jin in straight sets to reach the final.[29]

In the final, they had to settle for silver medal after they were beaten by Tontowi Ahmad and Liliyana Natsir for the second time in the tournament. Despite the fact that Goh and Chan lost in the final, they had created history of being the first Malaysian mixed doubles pair to claim an Olympic medal.[30]

In March 2017, Chan and Goh become the first Malaysian mixed doubles pair to reach the All England Open final since 1955.[31] They were close to winning but lost to China's Lu Kai and Huang Yaqiong in rubber sets after a few controversial fault calls by the umpire.[32] In April, they reached the semi-finals of Indian Open but were forced to concede a walkover to Zheng Siwei-Chen Qingchen after Goh fell ill.[33] They later suffered first round loss to Edi Subaktiar-Gloria Emanuelle Widjaja in the Malaysia Open.[34]

With Goh out of action due to injury, Chan partner Peck Yen Wei at the Indonesian Open where they reached the semi-finals.[35] Chan later team up with Cheah Yee See for the Australian Open and reached the quarter-finals.[36] In July, Chan and Cheah won their first career title together at the Russia Open.[37] At the 2017 Southeast Asian Games in Kuala Lumpur, he won silver in men's team and bronze in mixed doubles event.[38]

AchievementsEdit

Finals (10 titles, 11 runners-up)Edit

Outcome Year Tournament Partner Opponent in final Score
1 2009 Thailand Open Lim Khim Wah   Choong Tan Fook
  Lee Wan Wah
20–22, 21–14, 21–11
2 2009 Vietnam Open Goh Liu Ying   Flandy Limpele
  Cheng Wen-hsing
23–25, 19–21
1 2010 Badminton Asia Championships Goh Liu Ying   Yoo Yeon-seong
  Kim Min-jung
21–17, 20–22, 21–19
2 2011 Malaysia Masters Goh Liu Ying   Tantowi Ahmad
  Lilyana Natsir
21–18, 15–21, 19–21
1 2011 Bitburger Open Goh Liu Ying   Thomas Laybourn
  Kamilla Rytter Juhl
21–18, 14–21, 27–25
2 2012 Australia Open Goh Liu Ying   Chen Hung-ling
  Cheng Wen-hsing
20–22, 21–12, 21–23
1 2012 Malaysia Masters Goh Liu Ying   Irfan Fadhilah
  Weni Anggraini
21–12, 21–14
1 2012 Japan Open Goh Liu Ying   Muhammad Rijal
  Lilyana Natsir
21–12, 21–19
2 2012 China Open Goh Liu Ying   Xu Chen
  Ma Jin
21–15, 21–17
2 2013 Malaysia Open Goh Liu Ying   Joachim Fischer Nielsen
  Christinna Pedersen
21–13, 21–18
2 2014 Austrian International Lai Pei Jing   Robert Mateusiak
  Agnieszka Wojtkowska
15–21, 21–15, 16–21
1 2015 Polish Open Goh Liu Ying   Akshay Dewalkar
  Pradnya Gadre
28–26, 21–18
2 2015 Southeast Asian Games Goh Liu Ying   Praveen Jordan
  Debby Susanto
18–21, 21–13, 23–25
1 2015 Russian Open Goh Liu Ying   Yuta Watanabe
  Arisa Higashino
21–14, 21–12
1 2015 Mexico City Grand Prix Goh Liu Ying   Choi Solgyu
  Eom Hye-won
21–13, 23–21
2 2016 Thailand Masters Goh Liu Ying   Zheng Siwei
  Chen Qingchen
17–21, 15–21
1 2016 New Zealand Open Goh Liu Ying   Zheng Siwei
  Li Yinhui
21–19, 22–20
2 2016 Malaysia Open Goh Liu Ying   Tantowi Ahmad
  Lilyana Natsir
21–23, 21–13, 16–21
2 2016 2016 Summer Olympics Goh Liu Ying   Tantowi Ahmad
  Lilyana Natsir
14–21, 12–21
2 2017 All England Open Goh Liu Ying   Lu Kai
  Huang Yaqiong
21–18, 19–21, 16–21
1 2017 Russian Open Cheah Yee See   Keiichiro Matsui
  Akane Araki
11–8, 13–11, 11–3
     Super Series tournament
     Grand Prix Gold and Grand Prix tournament
     International Challenge tournament

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Peng Soon our champion, says dad". The Star. 18 August 2016. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  2. ^ "10 things about: Chan Peng Soon, badminton Olympic silver medallist". The Malay Mail Online. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  3. ^ "Peng Soon wants good results from world meet as wedding gift". The Star. 13 August 2010. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  4. ^ "May May believes hubby Peng Soon will win gold". The Star. 16 August 2016. Retrieved 18 January 2017. 
  5. ^ "Chan Peng Soon Profile". Badminton World Federation. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  6. ^ "Peng Soon-Khim Wah snatch maiden Open title". The Star. 27 July 2009. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  7. ^ "Malaysians lose in three Viet Open finals". The Star. 12 October 2009. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  8. ^ "Young pair win Malaysia's first major mixed doubles title". The Star. 19 April 2010. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  9. ^ "Peng Soon-Liu Ying may be answer to mixed doubles woes". The Star. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  10. ^ "Peng Soon-Liu Ying bags maiden international title". The Star. 9 November 2011. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  11. ^ "Chan-Goh suffer frustrating loss to Indonesian mixed pair". The Star. 11 March 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  12. ^ "Lady Luck deserts Chan-Goh as they fall to Taiwanese pair". The Star. 9 April 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  13. ^ "Record Open haul". The Star. 7 May 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  14. ^ "Hunt for gold: Chong Wei through, all eyes on Malaysia’s mixed doubles pair tonight". Yahoo! News. 17 August 2016. Retrieved 20 August 2016. 
  15. ^ "Chan and Goh win first Super Series mixed doubles title". The Star. 24 September 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  16. ^ "Pei Jing chosen as Peng Soon's new partner". The Star. 28 January 2014. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  17. ^ "Peng Soon-Pei Jing fall in Austria final". The Star. 23 February 2014. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  18. ^ "Liu Ying-Peng Soon back together for Singapore Open". The Star. 8 April 2014. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  19. ^ "Peng Soon-Pei Jing combo still needs work". The Star. 8 June 2014. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  20. ^ "Badminton: Chan-Goh clinch mixed doubles title at Russian Open". Astro Awani. 26 July 2015. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  21. ^ "Chan Peng Soon/Goh Liu Ying get revenge, win Mexico City GP". BadmintonPlanet.com. 20 December 2015. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  22. ^ "SEA Games: Indonesia top badminton medals tally with three golds". The Straits Times. 16 June 2015. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  23. ^ "Chan-Goh miss Thailand Masters title but secure Rio spot". The Star. 13 February 2016. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  24. ^ "New Zealand Open: Goh Liu Ying-Chan Peng Soon clinch mixed doubles victory". FourthOfficial.com. 28 March 2016. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  25. ^ "(Olympics) Shuttlers Peng Soon-Liu Ying make mixed doubles final". The Star. 10 April 2016. Retrieved 20 August 2016. 
  26. ^ "Peng Soon-Liu Ying: We have a medal chance at Rio Games". The Star. 21 July 2016. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  27. ^ "Good day for Malaysian doubles shuttlers in Rio too". The Star. 12 August 2016. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  28. ^ "Peng Soon-Liu Ying storm into Olympic Games semis in style". The Star. 15 August 2016. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  29. ^ "(Olympics) Shuttlers Peng Soon-Liu Ying make mixed doubles final". New Straits Times. 16 August 2016. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  30. ^ "(Olympics) Heartbreak for Malaysia as gold slips through Liu Ying-Peng Soon's grasp". New Straits Times. 18 August 2016. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  31. ^ "Peng Soon-Liu Ying end Malaysia’s 62-year absence in mixed doubles final". The Star. 12 March 2017. Retrieved 17 March 2017. 
  32. ^ "Malaysian doubles pair lose in All-England final". The Star. 12 March 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  33. ^ "Chan-Goh concede walkover in Indian Open semi-finals". The Star. 2 April 2017. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  34. ^ "Chong Wei marches into 2nd round of Malaysian Open". The Star. 5 April 2017. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  35. ^ "Yen Wei grateful for chance to play with Peng Soon at Indonesian Open". The Star. 19 June 2017. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  36. ^ "Yee See looks forward to playing again with Peng Soon". The Star. 9 July 2017. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  37. ^ "Peng Soon gels well with Yee See to clinch Russian Open title". The Star. 24 July 2017. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  38. ^ "Four doubles pairs fight tooth and nail but only two survive". The Star. 29 August 2017. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 

External linksEdit