Broadcasting Satellite System Corporation

The Broadcasting Satellite System Corporation (B-SAT) is a Japanese corporation established in April 1993 to procure, manage and lease transponders on communications satellites. Its largest stockholder, owning 49.9%, is NHK, the Japan Broadcasting Corporation.[1] In 1994, it was ranked by Space News as the world's 19th largest fixed satellite operator.[2]

Satellite fleetEdit

The B-SAT fleet has an extensive history. This is an overview of the satellites.

Former satellitesEdit

These satellites were managed by Broadcasting Satellite System Corporation but are now decommissioned.[3]

BSAT-1aEdit

BSAT-1a was an HS-376 based satellite with 4 active plus 4 spares Ku-band transponders. It was successfully launched on 16 April 1997 aboard an Ariane 44LP along Thaicom 3.[4]

BSAT-1bEdit

BSAT-1b was an HS-376 based satellite with 4 active plus 4 spares Ku-band transponders. It was successfully launched on 28 April 1998 aboard an Ariane 44P along Nilesat 101.[4]

BSAT-2aEdit

BSAT-2a was manufactured by Orbital Sciences Corporation based on the Star Bus platform. It was launched aboard an Ariane 5G rocket on 8 March 2001. BSAT-2a serves as an on orbit backup to BSAT-2c. BSAT-2a was decommissioned in January 2013.[5]

BSAT-2bEdit

BSAT-2b was a twin of BSAT-2a, also based on the Star Bus platform. Launched along Artemis aboard an Ariane 5G, it was left on an unusable orbit and that it couldn't compensate for. The electric propulsion Artemis, could use its higher efficiency ion drives, to reach operational orbit.[6][7]

BSAT-2cEdit

BSAT-2c was manufactured by Orbital Sciences Corporation Based on the Star Bus platform. It was launched aboard an Ariane 5 rocket on 11 June 2003. In-orbit delivery to B-SAT took place 15 July 2003.[8] BSAT-2c was decommissioned in August 2013.[5]

Current satellitesEdit

The current fleet of Broadcasting Satellite System Corporation as of August 2020 is composed of five spacecraft.[3]

BSAT-3aEdit

Launched on 14 August 2007 by an Ariane 5 ECA launch vehicle.[9] It was manufactured by Lockheed Martin Commercial Space Systems based on the A2100A platform design, with a communications payload containing 12 Ku-band channels, eight of which operate at one time.[10] Located in geostationary orbit at 110.0° East longitude, it replaced BSAT-1a and BSAT-1b.[1]

BSAT-3bEdit

B-SAT awarded Lockheed Martin the contract to build its next geostationary telecommunications satellite, BSAT-3b, which was launched by Arianespace aboard an Ariane 5 ECA (along with the Eutelsat W3B) on 28 October 2010.[11][12][13]

BSAT-3cEdit

BSAT-3c, also known as JCSAT-110R, is a satellite co-owned with SKY Perfect JSAT with each operator owning a separate payload. It was built by Lockheed Martin on its A2100A platform. It has two separate payloads with 12 Ku-band transponders each. It was successfully launched on 7 August 2011 on an Ariane 5 ECA along Astra 1N.[14]

BSAT-4aEdit

The first satellite of the fourth generation BSAT was built by SSL on its SSL 1300 platform. It has 24 Ku-band transponders and mass of 3,520 kilograms (7,760 lb). BSAT-4a launched on 29 September 2017 aboard an Ariane 5 ECA.[15]

BSAT-4bEdit

The second satellite of the fourth generation BSAT was built by Maxar Technologies on its SSL 1300 platform. It has 24 Ku-band transponders and mass around 3,530 kilograms (7,780 lb). BSAT-4b was launched aboard an Ariane 5 ECA on 15 August 2020.[16]

Satellite listEdit

Name Bus Payload Order Launch Launch Vehicle Launch Result Launch Weight Status Remarks
BS-3N AS-3000 3 Ku-band N/A 8 July 1994 Ariane 44L Success 1,100 kilograms (2,400 lb) Decommissioned in August 2011 Launched with PAS 2.[17] Transferred to B-SAT in November 1998.[5][18]
BSAT-1a HS-376 4 Ku-band 1993 16 April 1997 Ariane 44LP Success 1,236 kilograms (2,725 lb) Decommissioned in August 2010 Launched with Thaicom 3.
BSAT-1b HS-376 4 Ku-band 1993 28 April 1998 Ariane 44P Success 1,236 kilograms (2,725 lb) Decommissioned in August 2011 Launched with Nilesat 101.
BSAT-2a STAR-1 4 Ku-band 1999 8 March 2001 Ariane 5G Success 1,292 kilograms (2,848 lb) Decommissioned in January 2013 Launched with Eurobird 1.[6][5]
BSAT-2b STAR-1 4 Ku-band 1999 12 July 2001 Ariane 5G Failure 1,292 kilograms (2,848 lb) Launch failure Launched with Artemis. Launch failure left it in too low an orbit.[6][5]
BSAT-2c STAR-1 4 Ku-band 2001 11 June 2003 Ariane 5G Success 1,275 kilograms (2,811 lb) Decommissioned in August 2013 Launched with Optus C1.[5][19]
BSAT-3a A2100A 12 Ku-band 2005 14 August 2007 Ariane 5 ECA Success 1,967 kilograms (4,336 lb) Operational at 110.0° East Launched along Spaceway-3.[5][20]
BSAT-3b A2100A 12 Ku-band 2008 28 October 2010 Ariane 5 ECA Success 2,060 kilograms (4,540 lb) Operational at 110.0° East Launched with Eutelsat W3B.[5][20]
BSAT-3c A2100A 24 Ku-band and 24 C-band 2008 6 August 2011 Ariane 5 ECA Success 2,910 kilograms (6,420 lb) Operational at 110.0° East Launched with Astra 1N. Co-owned with SKY Perfect JSAT, named as JCSAT-110R. Backup of N-SAT-110.[14][5]
BSAT-4a SSL 1300 24 Ku-band 2015 29 September 2017 Ariane 5 ECA Success 3,520 kilograms (7,760 lb) Operational at 110.0° East Launched with Intelsat 37e
BSAT-4b SSL 1300 24 Ku-band 2018 15 August 2020 Ariane 5 ECA Success 3,530 kilograms (7,780 lb) Success at 110.0° East Launched with Galaxy 30 and MEV-2

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Broadcasting Satellite System Corporation Profile". B-SAT. Archived from the original on 7 July 2009.
  2. ^ "Top 20 Fixed Satellite Operators, 2004". Space News. Archived from the original on 31 August 2005.
  3. ^ a b "BS放送を支える放送衛星" [Broadcast Satellite support network] (in Japanese). B-SAT Corporation. Retrieved 2016-09-08.
  4. ^ a b Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-09-08). "BSat 1a, 1b". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-20.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Milestones". Broadcasting Satellite System Corporation. Archived from the original on 2016-09-08. Retrieved 2016-09-09.
  6. ^ a b c Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-09-08). "BSat 2a, 2b". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-20.
  7. ^ Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-09-08). "Artemis". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-20.
  8. ^ "ORBITAL MAKES FINAL IN-ORBIT DELIVERY OF BSAT-2c SATELLITE". Orbital Sciences.
  9. ^ "BSAT-3A - NSSDC ID: 2007-036B". NASA.   This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  10. ^ "Lockheed Martin-Built BSAT-3a Satellite Ready For Launch". Lockheed Martin. Archived from the original on 2008-03-05.
  11. ^ "B-SAT AWARDS LOCKHEED MARTIN CONTRACT FOR BSAT-3b SATELLITE". Lockheed Martin. 2008-04-15. Archived from the original on 21 May 2008.
  12. ^ "Lockheed Martin-Built BSAT-3b Satellite Successfully Launched for the Broadcasting Satellite System Corporation of Japan". Lockheed Martin. 2010-10-28. Archived from the original on 4 April 2010.
  13. ^ "All Systems Are Nominal Aboard Lockheed Martin Bsat-3b Satellite Following October 28 Launch". Lockheed Martin. 2010-11-04. Archived from the original on 13 November 2010.
  14. ^ a b Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-09-08). "BSat 3c / JCSAT 110R". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-20.
  15. ^ Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-09-08). "BSat 4a". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-20.
  16. ^ B-SAT corporation
  17. ^ Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-09-08). "BS 3a, 3b, 3n (Yuri 3a, 3b, 3n)". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-09-06.
  18. ^ McDowell, Jonathan. "Geostationary Orbit Catalog". Archived from the original on 2016-09-09. Retrieved 2016-09-09.
  19. ^ Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-09-08). "BSat 2c". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-20.
  20. ^ a b Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-09-08). "BSat 3a, 3b". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-09-06.