Bezdružice

Bezdružice (Czech pronunciation: [ˈbɛzdruʒɪtsɛ]; German: Weseritz) is a town in Plzeň Region of the Czech Republic. It lies some 30 km (19 mi) to the north-west from the region capital of Plzeň.

Bezdružice
Town
Bezdružice seen from the south
Bezdružice seen from the south
Flag of Bezdružice
Flag
Coat of arms of Bezdružice
Coat of arms
Bezdružice is located in Czech Republic
Bezdružice
Bezdružice
Location in the Czech Republic
Coordinates: 49°54′26″N 12°58′21″E / 49.90722°N 12.97250°E / 49.90722; 12.97250Coordinates: 49°54′26″N 12°58′21″E / 49.90722°N 12.97250°E / 49.90722; 12.97250
Country Czech Republic
RegionPlzeň
DistrictTachov
First mentioned1227
Government
 • MayorLumír Kadlec
Area
 • Total32.02 km2 (12.36 sq mi)
Elevation
576 m (1,890 ft)
Population
 (2020-01-01[1])
 • Total938
 • Density29/km2 (76/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code
349 53
Websitewww.bezdruzice.cz

HistoryEdit

The earliest record of the town dates back to the 12th century. [2]

From 1520 to 1614, a deadly plague infected the town. In 1646, the town was burn down by Swedish people. In 1808, another plague hit the town, in 1809, a fire burnt down many parts of the town, and in 1815, a windstorm attacked.[3]

However, it became more popular when a railway was introduced to the town. The railway quickly gentrified the town. However, the population declined during World War 2.[3]

In 1949, Bezdružice lost the status of a town and was incorporated into the district of Tachov.[3] On October 10, 2006, the municipality regained its town status.

SightsEdit

Bezdružice château is a Gothic castle built in the town by the Kolowrat family before 1330. The castle was partly demolished in the 18th century, but it was remodeled in the Baroque style.[4]

GalleryEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Population of Municipalities – 1 January 2020". Czech Statistical Office. 2020-04-30.
  2. ^ "Historie obce Bezdružice". mistopisy.cz (in Czech). Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  3. ^ a b c "Bezdružice: Ze zemědělské osady prosperujícím městem". tachovsko.com (in Czech). Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  4. ^ Bělohlávek, Miloslav (1985). Castles, chateaux and fortresses in Bohemia, Moravia and Silesia. Western Bohemia. pp. 32, 37.

External linksEdit