Open main menu

Benjamin Bourne (September 9, 1755 – September 17, 1808) was a United States Representative from Rhode Island, a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island and a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Circuit Court for the First Circuit.

Benjamin Bourne
Benjamin Bourne.jpg
Judge of the United States Circuit Court for the First Circuit
In office
February 20, 1801 – July 1, 1802
Appointed byJohn Adams
Preceded bySeat established by 2 Stat. 89
Succeeded bySeat abolished
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island
In office
October 13, 1796 – February 20, 1801
Appointed byGeorge Washington
Preceded byHenry Marchant
Succeeded byDavid Leonard Barnes
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Rhode Island's at-large district
In office
August 31, 1790 – October 13, 1796
Preceded bySeat established
Succeeded byElisha Reynolds Potter
Personal details
Born
Benjamin Bourne

(1755-09-09)September 9, 1755
Bristol,
Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations,
British America
DiedSeptember 17, 1808(1808-09-17) (aged 53)
Bristol, Rhode Island
Resting placeJuniper Hill Cemetery
Bristol, Rhode Island
Political partyFederalist
RelativesShearjashub Bourne
EducationHarvard University (M.A.)
read law

Education and careerEdit

Born on December 9, 1755, in Bristol, Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, British America,[1] Bourne graduated from Harvard University in 1775, received a Master of Arts degree from the same institution in 1778, and read law.[1] He was quartermaster of the Second Rhode Island Regiment in 1776.[2] He was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Providence, Rhode Island.[2] He was a deputy in the Rhode Island General Assembly in 1780 and from 1787 to 1790.[1] He was clerk of the Rhode Island General Assembly from 1780 to 1786.[1] He was a Justice of the Peace in Providence from 1785 to 1790.[1]

Congressional serviceEdit

Upon the ratification of the United States Constitution by the State of Rhode Island, Bourne was elected as a Pro-Administration candidate from Rhode Island's at-large congressional district to the United States House of Representatives of the 1st through the 3rd United States Congresses and as a Federalist to the 4th and 5th United States Congresses and served from August 31, 1790, until his resignation on October 13, 1796, before the close of the 4th United States Congress.[2]

Federal judicial serviceEdit

Bourne received a recess appointment from President George Washington on October 13, 1796, to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island vacated by Judge Henry Marchant.[1] He was nominated to the same position by President Washington on December 21, 1796.[1] He was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 22, 1796, and received his commission the same day.[1] His service terminated on February 20, 1801, due to his elevation to the First Circuit.[1]

Bourne was nominated by President John Adams on February 18, 1801, to the United States Circuit Court for the First Circuit, to a new seat authorized by 2 Stat. 89.[1] He was confirmed by the Senate on February 20, 1801, and received his commission the same day.[1] His service terminated on July 1, 1802, due to abolition of the court.[1]

Later service and deathEdit

Following his departure from the federal bench, Bourne resumed private practice in Providence and Bristol from 1801 to 1808.[1] He died on September 17, 1808, in Bristol.[1] He was interred in Juniper Hill Cemetery in Bristol.[2]

FamilyEdit

Bourne was a first cousin once removed of Massachusetts United States Representative Shearjashub Bourne.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Benjamin Bourne at the Biographical Directory of Federal Judges, a public domain publication of the Federal Judicial Center.
  2. ^ a b c d United States Congress. "Benjamin Bourne (id: B000669)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
  3. ^ New England Families, Genealogical and Memorial: A Record of the ..., Volume 2 William Richard Cutter p.683

External linksEdit