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The Athénée de Luxembourg (English: Luxembourg Athenaeum), is a high school situated in Luxembourg City, in southern Luxembourg. Throughout the school's history of more than 400 years, the name was changed repeatedly. It's nowadays commonly called Stater Kolléisch or De Kolléisch, and is the nation's oldest school still in existence.

Athénée de Luxembourg
Athénée Lux 1 Dez 07.jpg
Location
Luxembourg City
Luxembourg
Coordinates 49°37′12″N 06°01′51″E / 49.62000°N 6.03083°E / 49.62000; 6.03083
Information
Type State school
Motto "Innovation comme tradition" "Vivat, crescat, floreat"
Established 1603
Founder Jesuit Order
Principal Joseph Salentiny
Campus size 0.2 square kilometres (0.077 sq mi)
Campus type Campus Geesseknäppchen
Website

Contents

HistoryEdit

Jesuit OriginsEdit

On 15 May 1585, Pope Sixtus V signed a Papal bull granting the Jesuit Order the right to establish a school in Luxembourg.[1] The school was eventually founded in 1603 by the Jesuit Order,[2][3] and was located next to the Notre Dame Cathedral, in the Ville Haute quarter. It was modeled after the Jesuit school in Trier. The school flourished and in 1684 it was expanded.[4] After the Suppression of the Society of Jesus by Pope Clement XIV in 1773, the school was renamed as the Collège royal,[5] and was put under auspices of the clergy. Furthermore, the school's curriculum was reformed and expanded.

Secularization[6]Edit

 
The Athénée de Luxembourg in 1828

In the course of the French Revolution and the political changes that followed, notably the Napoleon Regime, the school was reorganized according to French educational systems and renamed several times: École centrale (1795-1802), École Secondaire (1802-1808), Collège municipal (1808-1817). In 1817, the school was renamed "Athénée royal grand-ducal". To commemorate this event, a chronogram ATHENAEVM SIT LVCELBVRGI DECOR (=1817) was placed on the backside of a portal at the school's old premises. In the course of the 19th century, the curriculum was expanded and modernized.

Second World War[7]Edit

When Luxembourg was occupied by Nazi forces in World War II in 1940, the school was forcibly Germanized, renamed as Gymnasium mit Oberschule für Jungen, and the French language was forbidden. These policies were met with considerable resistance. Infamously, when the Germans dismantled the Gëlle Fra memorial, several hundred of the school's students protested. 2 Professors and 76 students of the Athénéé lost their lives during the war.

Post-World War II: A New BuildingEdit

After the Second World War, the school's premises became too small, and the school was relocated in 1964 to the Hollerich quarter, in the south-west of the city. Since the Athénée moved to this location, other schools have moved to the site as well, creating Campus Geesseknäppchen, just to the north of the terminus of the A4 motorway. The old site of the city Athenaeum currently hosts the National Library.

21st centuryEdit

In 2003, the school celebrated its 400th anniversary with a series of events and the publication of a four-volume study of the school's rich history. The school's official motto is 'Tradition & Innovation', a phrase that the reflects the institution's continuous emphasis on scholarly excellence, the respect of humanist traditions and the desire to stay innovative.

Since 2007, Joseph Salentiny is the principal of the 'Athénée de Luxembourg'. Since 2012, temporary buildings were built in the school's court to accommodate the students while the existing premises are undergoing renovation works. The renovations cost 89 million euros, and was completed in late 2016. [8] [9]

Academic aspectsEdit

Athénée de Luxembourg is an academic institution that achieves very competitive public exam results. In 2015, the final exam results and the passing rate were higher than the national average. In that year, 235 students presented themselves to the exams.[10]

Exam Results in 2015 [11])
Type of Result Athénéé Nationwide
Total number of pupils that passed 205 (87,3%) 80,0%
Resits 23 (9,8%) 14,0%
Failure 7 (2,9%) 5,9%
Grade «Excellent» 23 (9,8%) 86 (4,5%)
Grade «Very Good» 26 (11,1%) 154 (8,1%)
Grade «Good» 115 (49,0%) 720 (37,9%)
Grade «Good Enough» 30 (12,8%) 360 (18,9%)

International BaccalaureateEdit

In 2010, the Athénée de Luxembourg gained the status of an IB World School, and henceforth, includes an International Baccalaureate program.[12] [13]

The school's charterEdit

The school adopted a charter outlining its educational guidelines and principles. The sharer is built on the principle of "a good possession for all time", a quote borrowed from Thucydides.[14] The charter consists of twelve principles:

  • Humanism and world openness
  • A critical and scientific mind
  • A taste for performance and joy of living
  • Ambition to succeed and respect for others
  • Competition and solidarity
  • Personal engagement and tolerance
  • Communal conscience and self-fulfillment
  • Responsibility and friendliness
  • Discipline and flexibility
  • Physical balance and intellectual enthusiasm
  • Creativity and endurance
  • Know how and life skills

ExtracurricularEdit

Kolléisch in ConcertEdit

Kolléisch in Concert is a series of concerts that have been organised at the school since 1981. Each year, the concerts take place before the Easter Holidays. The music is primarily performed by the students of the F Section (music).

annALes de l'Athénée de LuxembourgEdit

annALes de l'Athénée de Luxembourg is an annual publication chronicling that year's events at the school as well as containing essays relating to the schools or its alumni. The series has been published since 2008 and contains articles written in French, German, English and Luxembourgish.[15]

Éischt Hëllef Team Kolléisch (EHTK)Edit

Éischt Hëllef Team Kolléisch (EHTK) (First Aid Team of the Athénée) is a first aid group run by students of the school. The EHTK was founded in 1998, and in collaboration with the Luxembourgish Red Cross, first aid courses are offered to students. The EHTK works on health and safety aspects within the school community. In 2015, Prince Guillaume handed the Luxembourgish Youth Award (Prix du Mérite Jeunesse) to the EHTK. Other schools in Luxembourg have emulated the EHTK project.

Latein auf SteinEdit

The "Latein auf Stein" (lit: Latin on Stone) is a project that aims to register and interpret all Latin inscriptions and chronograms in Luxembourg.[16] Several schools in Germany have similar projects.

Notable alumniEdit

The Athénée has a long list of distinguished alumni, including eight Prime Ministers of Luxembourg, one Prime Minister of Belgium and one Prime Minister of France. Former pupils include:

Notable staff membersEdit

School principals[17]Edit

  • 1603 - 1608 : Théodore Othon Becanus
  • 1608 - 1609 : Zachéé Ribecius
  • 1609 - 1621 : François Aldernardus
  • 1621 - 1624 : Jean Spies
  • 1624 - 1629 : Antoine de Torres
  • 1620 - 1634 : Hubert Wiltheim
  • 1634 - 1636 : Jean Petri
  • 1636 - 1636 : Jean Henri de Nefve
  • 1636 - 1643 : Jean Rutius
  • 1643 - 1646 : Jean de Viron I
  • 1646 - 1650 : François de Steel
  • 1650 - 1653 : Jean-Michel Ludling
  • 1653 - 1656 : Jean de Viron II
  • 1656 - 1659 : Alexandre Wiltheim
  • 1659 - 1662 : Jean-Baptiste de Florbecq
  • 1662 - 1665 : André de Preumonteaux
  • 1665 - 1668 : François Flamen
  • 1668 - 1671 : Guillaume de Waha
  • 1671 - 1675 : Jean Mascault
  • 1675 - 1678 : François Bellegambe
  • 1678 - 1681 : Arnould Cardon
  • 1681 - 1685 : Jacques Pirenne I
  • 1685 - 1688 : Robert d'Assignies
  • 1688 - 1691 : Jacques Pirenne II
  • 1691 - 1694 : Joseph de Hennin
  • 1694 - 1697 : Lucas de Lattre
  • 1697 - 1700 : Pierre Alhoy
  • 1701 - 1704 : Ignace de la Porte
  • 1704 - 1707 : Pierre Forceville
  • 1707 - 1710 : Christophe Locart
  • 1710 - 1714 : Jean Quarré
  • 1714 - 1717 : François Weydert I
  • 1717 - 1720 : Etienne Petit
  • 1720 - 1723 : Pierre Fievet
  • 1724 - 1728 : Ambroise Lefebvre
  • 1728 - 1732 : Anselme Battelet
  • 1732 - 1735 : François Weydert II
  • 1735 - 1738 : Jean de Wallers
  • 1738 - 1742 : Ernest Hubertin
  • 1742 - 1746 : Marc Casteele
  • 1746 - 1749 : Ghislain Barbier I
  • 1749 - 1753 : Henri Colle
  • 1753 - 1756 : Ghislain Barbier II
  • 1756 - 1758 : Hubert Busin
  • 1759 - 1764 : Théodore Helm
  • 1764 - 1767 : Paul Lalieu
  • 1767 - 1769 : Firmin Murat
  • 1769 - 1770 : Nicolas Heinen
  • 1770 - 1773 : Joseph Descornaix
  • 1817 - 1818 : Antoine Hartmann
  • 1818 - 1821 : Jean-Gérard Mazuir
  • 1821 - 1866 : Michel Nicolas Muller
  • 1866 - 1867 : Jean-Pierre Michaelis
  • 1867 - 1869 : Nicolas Gredt
  • 1869 - 1884 : Alexandre de Colnet d'Huart
  • 1885 - 1906 : Nicolas Gredt
  • 1906 - 1917 : Gustave Zahn
  • 1917 - 1931 : François Manternach
  • 1931 - 1947 : Joseph Wagener
  • 1947 - 1957 : Jean-Pierre Stein
  • 1957 - 1970 : Pierre Winter
  • 1970 - 1978 : Joseph Heinen
  • 1978 - 1981 : Joseph Poeker
  • 1981 - 1993 : Henri Folmer
  • 1993 - 2007 : Emile Haag
  • 2007 -           : Joseph Salentiny

GalleryEdit

LiteratureEdit

  • 400 Joer Kolléisch (éditions saint-paul, 2003) (a comprehensive history in four volumes, written in French).
    • Vol. I  : Du Collège des Jésuites au Collège Municipal 1603-1815 (287 pp.)
    • Vol. II : L'Athénée et ses grands Anciens 1815-1993. (477 pp.)
    • Vol. III: L'Athénée aujourd'hui et demain. (269 pp.)
    • Vol. IV : Hommage à l'Athénée. (314 pp.)
  • Edouard Kayser : Les directeurs de l'Athénée depuis 1817 - Notices biographiques (Première partie); in : annALes de l'Athénée, vol. 8 (2014 - 2015); pp. 330–335.
  • Diederich, Paul: Athenäum 1932 - 1946, Wohnort und Schule (Association des Anciens de l'Athénée, 2001).
  • Métamorphoses de l'Athénée, 1603 - 1989 (Luxembourg, 1989).
  • Association des Anciens de l'Athénée: Kolléisch's Jongen am Krich, Luxembourg, November 2011, 570 p. ISBN 978-99959-729-0-5
  • Haag, Emile: Les jésuites et leur collège: renforcement de l'identité catholique entre 1603 et 1773 (pp 180–193); Luxembourg (Éditions Guy Binsfeld), 2011; 576 pages (ill.); ISBN 978-2-87954-235-5

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 400 Joer Kolléisch (éditions saint-paul, 2003) Vol. I  : Du Collège des Jésuites au Collège Municipal 1603-1815 p.66
  2. ^ 400 Joer Kolléisch (éditions saint-paul, 2003) Vol. I  : Du Collège des Jésuites au Collège Municipal 1603-1815 p.83
  3. ^ "Historique". al.lu. Retrieved 2015-12-12. 
  4. ^ 400 Joer Kolléisch (éditions saint-paul, 2003) Vol. I  : Du Collège des Jésuites au Collège Municipal 1603-1815 p.84
  5. ^ "Historique". al.lu. Retrieved 2015-12-12. 
  6. ^ "Historique". al.lu. Retrieved 2015-12-12. 
  7. ^ "Historique". al.lu. Retrieved 2015-12-12. 
  8. ^ http://www.wort.lu/de/lokales/89-millionen-euro-fuer-athenee-renovierung-4f61b21ae4b0860580a9c185
  9. ^ http://www.wort.lu/en/luxembourg/luxembourg-city-sneak-peek-inside-newly-renovated-athenee-lycee-586f7d0653590682caf175f0
  10. ^ http://www.al.lu data retrieved from the website on 5 August 2015
  11. ^ http://www.al.lu data retrieved from the website on 5 August 2015
  12. ^ International classes at the Athénée Archived December 9, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.
  13. ^ "Athénée de Luxembourg". International Baccalaureate®. Retrieved 2015-12-12. 
  14. ^ http://www.al.lu/index.php/presentation-generale-al/al-charte Charte du Kolléisch
  15. ^ "AnnALes". www.al.lu. Retrieved 2015-12-12. 
  16. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-12-09. Retrieved 2015-09-01.  Website of the "Latein auf Stein" project
  17. ^ 400 Joer Kolléisch (éditions saint-paul, 2003) Vol. I  : Du Collège des Jésuites au Collège Municipal 1603-1815 p.149

Coordinates: 49°36′15″N 06°06′39″E / 49.60417°N 6.11083°E / 49.60417; 6.11083