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Annemarie Moser-Pröll (born 27 March 1953) is a former World Cup alpine ski racer from Austria. Born in Kleinarl, Salzburg, she was the most successful female alpine ski racer during the 1970s, with six overall titles, including five consecutive. Moser-Pröll celebrated her biggest successes in downhill, giant slalom and combined races. In 1980, her last year as a competitor, she secured her third Olympic medal (and first gold) at Lake Placid and won five World Cup races. Her younger sister Cornelia Pröll is also a former Olympic alpine skier.[1]

Annemarie Moser-Pröll
Annemarie Moser-Pröll - Gala Nacht des Sports 2010.jpg
Moser-Pröll in 2010
Born (1953-03-27) 27 March 1953 (age 66)
Kleinarl, Salzburg,
Austria
Height1.70 m (5 ft 7 in)
Ski clubSchiklub Kleinarl
World Cup career
Seasons11 – (196980, no '76)
Individual wins62
Indiv. podiums113
Indiv. starts174
Updated on 2010-12-22.

CareerEdit

During her career, Moser-Pröll won the overall World Cup title a record six times, including five consecutive (1971–75). She has 62 individual World Cup victories, second to Lindsey Vonn on the female side. Though her record has been broken in absolute numbers, she is still the best ever woman in winning percentage (races won per races raced) because of the fewer races run each season during her era. She won five World Championship titles (3 downhill, 2 combined) and one Olympic gold medal. Of all female skiers, she is the one who won most races of a single discipline in a row (11 downhill races: all eight of the 1973 World Cup season, plus the first three of the following season).

The way to her first and only Olympic gold medal was quite long: At the 1972 games in Sapporo, Japan, she was considered the clear favourite for downhill and giant slalom, but in both events she finished second behind Marie-Theres Nadig of Switzerland. After winning a fifth consecutive title in overall and downhill, she interrupted her racing career to care for her ailing father, afflicted with lung cancer. She missed the entire 1976 World Cup season, including the 1976 Winter Olympics in Innsbruck, in her home country of Austria.[1] After the death of her father in June 1976, she resumed competitive skiing and was immediately among the best, with second place in the overall World Cup standings for two seasons (1977, 1978), and won the overall title for the sixth time in 1979. At the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, USA, she finished her extraordinary career by winning the downhill gold medal – with her 1972-rival Marie-Theres Nadig again on the podium, as bronze medalist.[2]

After racingEdit

Several weeks after the 1980 Olympics, she retired from competitive skiing and ran her own café, the "Weltcup-Café Annemarie" in Kleinarl, which was decorated with her extensive cup and trophy collection.[1]

She married Herbert Moser in 1974 and their daughter Marion was born in 1982. In December 2003 her first grandchild was born.

Eight months after the death of her husband, she retired from the gastronomy business in 2008 and sold the establishment to local entrepreneurs, who keep running it as "Café-Restaurant Olympia."

World Cup resultsEdit

Season standingsEdit

 
Annemarie Moser-Pröll, c. 1972
Season Age Overall Slalom Giant
Slalom
Super G Downhill Combined
1969 15 16 15 First
women's
WC SG
held in
January
1983
5 Officially
awarded
in 1976
& 1980
only
1970 16 6 14 3 8
1971 17 1 3 1 1
1972 18 1 9 1 1
1973 19 1 18 2 1
1974 20 1 5 7 1
1975 21 1 4 1 1
1976 22 family leave
1977 23 2 11 3 2
1978 24 2 8 5 1
1979 25 1 2 12 1
1980 26 2 3 7 2 2

Season titlesEdit

Season Discipline
1971 Overall
Downhill
Giant slalom
1972 Overall
Downhill
Giant slalom
1973 Overall
Downhill
1974 Overall
Downhill
1975 Overall
Downhill
Giant slalom
Combined
1978 Downhill
1979 Overall
Downhill
Combined

Race victoriesEdit

Season Date Location Race
1970 17 January 1970   Maribor, Slovenia Giant slalom
1971 6 January 1971   Maribor, Slovenia Slalom
29 January 1971   St. Gervais, France Slalom
18 February 1971   Sugarloaf, ME, USA Downhill
19 February 1971 Downhill
10 March 1971   Abetone, Italy Giant slalom
11 March 1971 Giant slalom
14 March 1971   Åre, Sweden Giant slalom
1972 3 December 1971   St. Moritz, Switzerland Downhill
17 December 1971   Bardonecchia, Italy Downhill
12 January 1972   Bad Gastein, Austria Downhill
18 January 1972   Grindelwald, Switzerland Downhill
22 January 1972   St. Gervais, France Giant slalom
19 February 1972   Banff, AB, Canada Giant slalom
25 February 1972   Crystal Mtn., WA, USA Downhill
1 March 1972   Heavenly Valley, CA, USA Giant slalom
1973 7 December 1972   Val d'Isère, France Giant slalom
19 December 1972   Saalbach, Austria Downhill
20 December 1972 Giant slalom
9 January 1973   Pfronten, West Germany Downhill
10 January 1973 Downhill
16 January 1973   Grindelwald, Switzerland Downhill
20 January 1973   St. Gervais, France Giant slalom
25 January 1973   Chamonix, France Downhill
2 February 1973   Schruns, Austria Downhill
10 February 1973   St. Moritz, Switzerland Downhill
2 March 1973   Mt. St. Anne, QC, Canada Giant slalom
1974 3 December 1973   Val d'Isere, France Downhill
19 December 1973   Zell am See, Austria Downhill
5 January 1974   Pfronten, West Germany Downhill
23 January 1974   Bad Gastein, Austria Downhill
1975 7 December 1974   Val d'Isere, France Downhill
12 December 1974   Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy Downhill
15 December 1974   Maribor, Slovenia Giant slalom
9 January 1975   Grindelwald, Switzerland Downhill
10 January 1975 Giant slalom
Combined
11 January 1975 Giant slalom
16 January 1975   Schruns, Austria Combined
31 January 1975   St. Gervais, France Combined
22 February 1975   Naeba, Japan Giant slalom
1977 15 December 1976   Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy Downhill
16 December 1976 Combined
1978 6 January 1978   Pfronten, West Germany Downhill
7 January 1978 Downhill
9 January 1978   Garmisch, West Germany Downhill
13 January 1978   Les Diablerets, Switzerland Downhill
11 March 1978   Bad Gastein, Austria Downhill
12 March 1978   Bad Kleinkirchheim, Austria Downhill
17 March 1978   Arosa, Switzerland Giant slalom
1979 9 December 1978   Piancavallo, Italy Downhill
17 December 1978   Val d'Isere, France Downhill
12 January 1979   Les Diablerets, Switzerland Downhill
17 January 1979   Meiringen, Switzerland Downhill
19 January 1979 Combined
26 January 1979   Schruns, Austria Downhill
4 February 1979   Pfronten, West Germany Combined
2 March 1979   Lake Placid, NY, USA Downhill
1980 14 December 1979   Piancavallo, Italy Combined
15 December 1979 Slalom
6 January 1980   Pfronten, West Germany Downhill

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Sports Reference / Biography Annemarie Moser-Pröll, retrieved 19 December 2014
  2. ^ Sports Reference / Olympic Sports, retrieved 19 December 2014

External linksEdit

Awards
Preceded by
  Trixi Schuba
Austrian Sportswoman of the year
1973–1975
Succeeded by
  Brigitte Habersatter
Preceded by
  Brigitte Habersatter
Austrian Sportswoman of the year
1977–1980
Succeeded by
  Claudia Kristofics-Binder