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Anna Júlia Donáth

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Anna Júlia Donáth (born 6 April 1987) is a Hungarian politician. She was elected as a Momentum Movement (part of the Renew Europe group) Member of the European Parliament (MEP) in the 2019 European parliamentary election. Donáth is the vice president of the party.

Anna Júlia Donáth

Donath Anna 001.jpg
Member of the European Parliament
Assumed office
2 July 2019[1]
ConstituencyHungary
Vice President of Momentum Movement
Assumed office
9 June 2018
Personal details
Born (1987-04-06) 6 April 1987 (age 32)
Budapest, Hungary
NationalityHungarian
Political party Hungarian:
Momentum Movement
 EU:
Renew Europe
Alma materEötvös Loránd University University of Amsterdam

Early life and careerEdit

Anna Júlia Donáth was born on 6 April 1987 in Budapest, Hungary to László Donáth and Ildikó Muntag.[2] She is the youngest of three siblings. Her father László Donáth is a pastor, and a former member of parliament for the Hungarian Socialist Party.[3] Her paternal grandfather, Ferenc Donáth, is of Jewish descent, and was a lawyer and one of the three secretaries of the Central Committee of the Hungarian Socialist Workers' Party during the Hungarian Revolution of 1956.[3][4][5][6]

Her early education was at Veres Péter High School in Békásmegyer, Budapest.[7] She studied sociology at the Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, and migration and ethnic studies at the University of Amsterdam.[8] After graduating, she completed an internship at the European Commission, before returning to Hungary to become a project manager for the non-governmental organization (NGO), Menedék.[4][8] She joined Momentum Movement in 2016, and became its vice president in June 2018.[9][10] Donáth was a candidate for the centrist party in the 2018 Hungarian parliamentary election.[11] The party did not win any seats in the election.[12]

In December 2018, she participated in a protest against the Hungarian government's new labour law dubbed by opponents as the 'slave law' which raised the overtime yearly cap for workers from 250 to 400 hours, and allowed businesses three years instead of one year to pay for the overtime.[13] Donáth was arrested at the protest, and later released.[14]

European ParliamentEdit

Donáth stood as a candidate for Momentum Movement in the 2019 European Parliament election. She was second on her party's list, and was elected as one of its two MEPs (the other being Katalin Cseh) in Hungary.[15][16] She represents the third generation of her family to enter political office (after her father and her paternal grandfather).[17] Donáth is a member of the Renew Europe party group.[2] In the European Parliament, she is a member of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs, and is part of the delegation to the EU–Albania Stabilisation and Association Parliamentary Committee.[2]

After becoming an MEP, she gained immunity from prosecution for her participation in the December 2018 labour law protest, however Donáth chose to waive it on 29 May 2019.[18]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Key dates ahead". European Parliament. 20 May 2017. Archived from the original on 25 May 2019. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  2. ^ a b c "Anna Júlia Donáth". European Parliament. Archived from the original on 25 August 2019. Retrieved 25 August 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Donáth László". National Assembly. Archived from the original on 25 August 2019. Retrieved 27 August 2019.
  4. ^ a b McLaughlin, Daniel (24 December 2018). "New generation taps Hungary's protest tradition to take on Orbán". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on 24 December 2018. Retrieved 25 August 2019.
  5. ^ "Ferenc Donath". Garden of the Righteous Worldwide. Archived from the original on 25 August 2019. Retrieved 27 August 2019.
  6. ^ "The Revolt in Hungary" (PDF). Central Intelligence Agency. p. 7. Archived (PDF) from the original on 27 August 2019. Retrieved 27 August 2019.
  7. ^ "1997–2005 b". Veres Péter High School. Archived from the original on 27 March 2019. Retrieved 27 August 2019.
  8. ^ a b "We are Europe" (PDF). Union of European Federalists. p. 8. Archived (PDF) from the original on 27 August 2019. Retrieved 27 August 2019.
  9. ^ "'Hirtelen találtam egy közösséget' – teltházas bemutatkozót tartott a Momentum". Szeretlek Magyarország (in Hungarian). 22 January 2017. Archived from the original on 27 August 2019. Retrieved 27 August 2019.
  10. ^ Domschitz, Mátyás (14 June 2018). "Női alelnöke lett a Momentumnak" (in Hungarian). Index. Archived from the original on 15 June 2018. Retrieved 27 August 2019.
  11. ^ "Budapest főváros 10.számú egyéni választókerület (Budapest III. kerület) eredménye" (in Hungarian). National Election Office. 8 April 2018. Archived from the original on 27 August 2019. Retrieved 27 August 2019.
  12. ^ Mortimer, Caroline (21 June 2019). "Hungarian political party offers punching bags for Budapest residents as part of election campaign". Euronews. Archived from the original on 27 August 2019. Retrieved 27 August 2019.
  13. ^ Karasz, Palko; Kingsley, Patrick (22 December 2018). "What Is Hungary's 'Slave Law,' and Why Has It Provoked Opposition?". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 30 May 2019. Retrieved 25 August 2019.
  14. ^ Hopkins, Valerie (21 December 2018). "Women in Hungary lead charge in pushback against Orban". Financial Times. Archived from the original on 25 August 2019. Retrieved 25 August 2019.
  15. ^ Juli, Boros (22 December 2018). "Két női listavezetővel indul az EP-választáson a Momentum" (in Hungarian). 444. Archived from the original on 20 March 2019. Retrieved 25 August 2019.
  16. ^ Oltermann, Philip; Walker, Shaun; Giuffrida, Angela (27 May 2019). "An NBA star, a TV chef and a comedian: meet some of the new MEPs". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 1 September 2019. Retrieved 25 August 2019.
  17. ^ Cseri, Péter (2 May 2019). "Donáth László és Donáth Anna: A mi családunkban nem armageddon, ha bevisznek a rendőrök". 168 Óra (in Hungarian). Retrieved 31 August 2019.
  18. ^ "Lemond mentelmi jogáról Donáth Anna". Heti Világgazdaság (in Hungarian). 30 May 2019. Archived from the original on 4 September 2019. Retrieved 25 August 2019.