Sultan Ali Madar (Somali: Suldaan Cali Suldaan Madar) was a Somali ruler and the 8th Sultan of the Habr Yunis Sultanate.

Sultan Ali Madar
سلطان علي مَدَر
8th Sultan of the Habr Yunis Sultanate
Reign1938-1979
PredecessorMadar Hersi
SuccessorOsman Ali
Born1900
Died1979
ReligionSunni Islam

OverviewEdit

After the death of Sultan Hersi Aman, the Baha Diiriye and Baha Makahil sections of the Sugulle dynasty vied for the Sultanship, which divided the Habr Yunis clan into two factions, one faction led by Guled Haji crowned Awad of the Baha Diiriye and the other Nur Ahmed Aman.[1][2] The two Sultans engaged in a lengthy war and divided the Sultanate's territory, where Awad ruled the Sultanate from his chosen capital of Burao.[3] Frank Linsley James visited Sultan Awad at Burao in 1884 and witnessed the dissenting situation between the two Sultans. Describing the political situation in the region, he writes:

It appeared the great Habr Gerhajis tribe was divided into two rival factions, the one owning allegiance to Sultan Owd, the other to his cousin, Sultan Noor. Between these two the country was about evenly divided, and the border-line was an everlasting scene of wars and rumours of wars, cattle raids, and attempted murders.[4]

The Haber-Gerhajis tribe had formerly been under one Sultan and were very powerful, making frequent raids into Ogadayn, but on his death, two cousins, Awad and Nur, divided the country between them.[5]

Awad was killed after a decade long war, allowing Nur to establish himself at Burao and rule over the entirety of the Habr Yunis. The Baha Diiriye still did not concede defeat and would eventually choose Awad's nephew and Ali's father, Madar, as their successor following Nur's death.[6]

Preceded by Habr Yunis Sultanate Succeeded by

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ British Somaliland by Drake Brockman, pp.79 - 82
  2. ^ 1912 Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society and Monthly Record of Geography 1885, Volume 7, p.627
  3. ^ The Academy: a weekly review of literature, science, and art. Volume 35, 1889, p.126
  4. ^ The Unknown Horn of Africa: An Exploration From Berbera to the Leopard River, 1888
  5. ^ Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society and Monthly Record of Geography, 1885, Volume 7, p.627
  6. ^ Journal of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol. 21, p.161