Open main menu

Wikipedia β

Ain Shams University (Arabic: جامعة عين شمس‎) is an institute of higher education located in Cairo, Egypt. Founded in 1950[1], the university provides education at the undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate levels.

Ain Shams University
جامعة عين شمس
Ain Shams logo.png
Horus, the embodiment of Highness and Egyptian Obelisk
Type Public
Established July 1950; 67 years ago (July 1950)
Administrative staff
8,800
Undergraduates 170,000
Location Cairo, Egypt
Campus Abbassia, Cairo
Website www.asu.edu.eg


Contents

HistoryEdit

Ain Shams University was founded in July 1950, the third-oldest non-sectarian native public Egyptian university (ancient Islamic universities such as Al-Azhar and private institutions such as the American University in Cairo are older), under the name of Ibrahim Pasha's University. Its site used to be a former royal palace, called the Zafarana Palace.[1] The two earlier universities of this kind are Cairo University (Fuad I university formerly) and Alexandria University (Farouk I university formerly). When it was first established, Ain Shams University had a number of faculties and academic institutes, which were later developed into a university.[2] The university's academic structure includes 14 faculties, 1 college and 2 high institutes plus 12 centers and special units.[3]

Faculties, colleges and institutesEdit

CampusesEdit

Ain Shams University has eight campuses. Two of them are next to each other, separated by a main road; all of them are in Greater Cairo.[4]

The main campus is in Abbassiya, Cairo and houses the Administration and Management at the Zaafarana palace, Science Education Development Center, Central Library, Child Hood Center and the University City (students hostel), in addition to the faculties of Computer Science, Science, Law and Art. The opposite Campus houses the faculty of Commerce, Alsun, pharmaceutical Science and Dentistry.

The Women's College has its own campus. Faculty of Specific Education, Faculty of Education and Faculty of Agriculture are each on separate campuses in Abassyia, Heliopolis and Shoubra El-Kheima respectively.

FilmingEdit

In 2012, Misr International films was producing a television series based on the novel Zaat by Sonallah Ibrahim. Filming of scenes set at Ain Shams University was scheduled to occur that year, but Muslim Brotherhood student members and some teachers at the school protested, stating that the 1970s era clothing worn by the actresses was indecent and would not allow filming unless the clothing was changed. Gaby Khoury, the head of the film company, stated that engineering department head Sherif Hammad "insisted that the filming should stop and that we would be reimbursed ... explaining that he was not able to guarantee the protection of the materials or the artists."[5]

RankingsEdit

According to the 2014 Webometrics World Universities rankings (aimed to promote Web publication, not to rank institutions), Ain Shams University is ranked 3rd in Egypt, 25th in Arab World and 15th in Africa.[6] [7]

PeopleEdit

Notable facultyEdit

Notable alumniEdit

Photo galleryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Ain Shams University". Times Higher Education (THE). Retrieved 2017-07-31. 
  2. ^ "Ain Shams University History". Retrieved May 25, 2018. 
  3. ^ "Ain Shams University Statistics". Retrieved May 25, 2018. 
  4. ^ "Ain Shams University Main Campus Map". Retrieved May 25, 2018. 
  5. ^ "Islamists halt filming of Egyptian TV series." Daily News Egypt. Thursday, February 9, 2012. NewsBank Record Number: 17587021. "[...]and teachers were against it, because of the clothing worn by the actresses," he said. The series, adapted from the novel "Zaat" by Egyptian author Sonallah Ibrahim, takes[...]"
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 4, 2009. Retrieved 2010-02-26. 
  7. ^ "Best universities in the Arab World 2018". March 20, 2018. Retrieved May 25, 2018. 
  8. ^ "Veteran Egyptian journalist Ibrahim Nafea dies at the age of 84". Ahram Online. 1 January 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018. 

External linksEdit