9-1-1: Lone Star is an American procedural drama television series focusing on the fire, police, and ambulance departments of the fictional company 126, located in Austin, Texas. The use of "Lone Star" in the name associates it with Texas, the "Lone Star State". It was created for Fox by Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, and Tim Minear. The series is a spin-off of the American procedural drama television series 9-1-1, and was ordered by Fox in May 2019. The series premiered on January 19, 2020.[1]

9-1-1: Lone Star
Genre
Created by
Starring
Composers
Country of originUnited States
Original languageEnglish
No. of seasons4
No. of episodes60 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producers
CinematographyAndrew Strahorn
Running time42–48 minutes
Production companies
Original release
NetworkFox
ReleaseJanuary 19, 2020 (2020-01-19) –
present (present)
Related
9-1-1

Fox renewed the show for a fourth season in May 2022, which premiered on January 24, 2023.[2][3] In May 2023, the series was renewed for a fifth season,[4] with the premiere delayed until the fall of 2024 due to the 2023 SAG-AFTRA strike.[5]

Premise

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From 9-1-1 co-creators Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk and Tim Minear, 9-1-1: Lone Star follows a sophisticated New York firefighter who, along with his son, relocates from Manhattan, New York to Austin, Texas. He must try to balance the duties of saving those who are at their most vulnerable and solving the problems in his own life. He is joined by other firefighters as well as members of the police department and emergency medical services. Series star Rob Lowe serves as co-executive producer.[6]

Cast and characters

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Overview

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Actor Character Seasons
1 2 3 4 5
Rob Lowe Owen Strand Main
Liv Tyler Michelle Blake Main Does not appear
Ronen Rubinstein Tyler Kennedy "TK" Strand Main
Sierra McClain Grace Ryder Main Does not appear
Jim Parrack Judson "Judd" Ryder Main
Natacha Karam Marjan Marwani Main
Brian Michael Smith Paul Strickland Main
Rafael L. Silva Carlos Reyes Main
Julian Works Mateo Chavez Main
Gina Torres Tommy Vega Does not appear Main
Brianna Baker Nancy Gillian Recurring Main
Kelsey Yates Isabella "Izzy" Vega Does not appear Guest Main
Skyler Yates Evie Vega Does not appear Guest Main

Main

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  • Rob Lowe as Owen Strand, firefighter captain from New York City and TK's father. He was diagnosed with lung cancer as a result of being a first responder to the September 11 attacks, in which he also lost his entire firehouse. Having rebuilt his team in New York, he was asked to do the same for the 126 in Austin.
  • Liv Tyler as Michelle Blake (season 1): the paramedic Emergency Medical Services (EMS) captain. She is also trying to locate her sister Iris, who has been missing for three years.[7] It is revealed in the second season that she left the 126 to help homeless people with mental illness like her sister.
  • Ronen Rubinstein as Tyler Kennedy "TK" Strand, a dual certified firefighter-paramedic with the 126. He is a recovering opioid addict and Captain Strand's son. A former addict, TK overdosed just prior to his arrival in Austin.[8] He starts a relationship with police officer Carlos Reyes. In season 2, he quit being a firefighter and became a paramedic. At the end of season 3, he proposed to Carlos and the two marry in the fourth season finale.
  • Sierra McClain as Grace Ryder (née Williams) (seasons 1–4[9]), a 9-1-1 operator and Judd's wife.[8]
  • Jim Parrack as Judson "Judd" Ryder, firefighter and Grace's husband. Judd is the sole survivor of 126's previous team's fire disaster.[10]
  • Natacha Karam as Marjan Marwani, a firefighter and paramedic. Marjan is an adrenaline junkie, a devout Muslim, and an Instagram celebrity.[11]
  • Brian Michael Smith as Paul Strickland, a firefighter and paramedic with a keen eye for details. Paul is also a trans man.[11]
  • Rafael L. Silva as Carlos Reyes, a police officer with the Austin Police Department, who begins a romantic relationship with TK. TK proposes at the end of season 3 and after his father is murdered, they get married in the season 4 finale.[11][b]
  • Julian Works as Mateo Chavez.[11] He is severely dyslexic, and is a DREAM-er who must keep his job or be deported.
  • Gina Torres as Tommy Vega (season 2–present): an EMS replacement captain. Tommy, mother of twin daughters, re-entered the workforce after eight years, to support her family when COVID-19 caused her husband's restaurant to close.
  • Brianna Baker as Nancy Gillian (recurring, seasons 1–2; season 3–present[12]): A paramedic who is a member of the Rescue 126 EMS crew.
  • Kelsey Yates as Isabella "Izzy" Vega (guest, season 2; season 3–present):[c] Tommy's daughter and Evie's twin sister.
  • Skyler Yates as Evie Vega (guest, season 2; season 3–present):[d] Tommy's daughter and Izzy's twin sister.

Recurring

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  • Kyle Secor as Deputy Chief Alden Radford (season 1; guest, season 2): A fire chief who convinces Owen to come to Austin to rebuild Station 126.
  • Mark Elias as Timothy M. Rosewater (seasons 1–2): A paramedic who is also a member of Rescue 126 EMS crew. He dies while on a call.
  • Jon Foster as Dustin Shepard (season 1): An ex-boyfriend of Michelle Blake's missing sister, Iris, who Michelle believes is connected to Iris's disappearance.
  • Brett Rice as Wayne Gettinger (season 1): An elderly man who is receiving chemotherapy treatments at the same time as Owen. He also offers Owen advice on how to deal with his cancer.
  • Mary Kay Place as Theresa Blake (season 1): Michelle's mother who wants Michelle to move on from what happened to Iris, Theresa's younger daughter who went missing.
  • Natalie Zea as Zoe (season 1): A psychology professor at the University of Texas at Austin. She meets Owen at a beauty supply store and later begins dating him.
  • Billy Burke as Captain/later Deputy Chief William "Billy" Tyson (seasons 1 and 3; guest season 2): A former firefighter for the 126 who also has cancer.
  • Tamala Jones as Det. Sarina Washington (season 1; guest, seasons 3–4): A detective with the Austin Police Department.
  • Lyndsy Fonseca as Iris Blake (seasons 1 and 4): Michelle's missing sister.
  • Lisa Edelstein as Gwyneth "Gwyn" Morgan (seasons 2–3; guest, season 4): Owen's ex-wife and TK's mother, who arrives in Austin after her son's hospitalization. She dies in season 3.[13][14]
  • Derek Webster as Charles Vega (season 2): Tommy's husband. He dies in season 2.[15]
  • Lexi Crouch as Isabella "Izzy" Vega (season 2):[e] Tommy's and Charles' daughter and Evie's twin sister.
  • Xandi Crouch as Evie Vega (season 2):[f] Tommy's and Charles' daughter and Izzy's twin sister.
  • Benito Martinez as Gabriel Reyes (seasons 2 and 4; guest, season 3): Carlos' father, a Texas Ranger. He dies in season 4.
  • Roxana Brusso as Andrea Reyes (seasons 2 and 4; guest season 3): Carlos' mother.
  • Todd Stashwick as Dennis Raymond (season 2): An arson investigator who is later revealed to be a serial arsonist himself.
  • Jack Conley as Captain Jack Tatum (guest, season 2; season 3): Captain at station 129.
  • Julie Benz as Sadie Becker (season 3): A woman who rents the cabin next to Owen's.
  • Carly Dutcher as Lindsey Robertson (season 3): A teenage woman Paul saves.
  • Jackson Pace as Wyatt Harris (seasons 3–4): Judd's son he had through a one-night stand 17 years earlier.
  • Amy Acker as Catherine Harper (season 3): Chief of staff for the governor of Texas. Catherine and Owen meet through an exclusive dating app.[16]
  • Robyn Lively as Marlene Harris (season 3; guest, season 4): The mother of Judd's son, Wyatt.
  • Nathan Owens as Julius Vega (season 3): Charles' brother and Tommy's brother-in-law.
  • Neal McDonough as Sgt. Ty O'Brien (guest, season 3; season 4): A hard-assed Austin PD Sergeant First Grade who is known for both his by the book approach and his dislike of firefighters.
  • Amanda Schull as Special Agent Rose Casey (season 4): An FBI agent investigating members of an extremist group, with Owen's help.
  • D. B. Woodside as Trevor (season 4): The new pastor at Tommy's church who becomes her love interest.
  • Ashley Rae Spillers as Lila Gerald (season 4): a woman Marjan saves who later sues her.
  • Jamison Webb as Mitch Gerald (season 4): a man Marjan saves who later sues her.
  • Michaela McManus as Kendra Harrington (season 4): A charitable billionaire heiress who is Owen's love interest.
  • Amanda Payton as Jasmine Asha Fulton (season 4): AFD Department Advocate at the 126.
  • Chad Lowe as Robert Strand (guest season 3; season 4): Owen’s brother who has Huntington's disease.
  • Andy Favreau as Pearce Risher (guest seasons 2–3; season 4): An egotistical paramedic who works briefly at the 126 then is employed by a private ambulance service.

Guest

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  • Alex Carter as Captain (season 1): The former captain of the 126 who is killed in the explosion.
  • Jesse Luken as Jake Harkes (season 1): One of the former members of the 126 who is killed in the explosion.
  • Matt McTighe as Chuck Parkland (season 1): One of the former members of the 126 who is killed in the explosion.
  • Graham Shiels as Cory Garrity (season 1): One of the former members of the 126 who is killed in the explosion.
  • Angel Parker as Josie (season 1): A woman who Paul meets on a call. They date briefly, until she learns he is trans.
  • Barry Corbin as Stuart Ryder (seasons 1–3): Judd Ryder's father.
  • Mena Massoud as Salim (season 2): Marjan's childhood friend whom she has been arranged to be married since they were twelve.[17]
  • William Allen Young as Benjamin Williams (season 2 and 4): Grace's father.
  • Barbara Eve Harris as Denice Williams (season 2 and 4): Grace's mother.
  • Bart Johnson as Stanley (season 3): Marlene's fiancé and Wyatt's future stepfather.

Crossover cast

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Regular cast members of the original 9-1-1:

  • Aisha Hinds as Henrietta "Hen" Wilson (special guest, season 2): L.A. firefighter and paramedic.
  • Ryan Guzman as Edmundo "Eddie" Díaz (special guest, season 2): L.A. firefighter.
  • Oliver Stark as Evan "Buck" Buckley (special guest, season 2): L.A. firefighter.
  • Angela Bassett as Athena Grant-Nash (special guest, season 3): LAPD patrol sergeant.

Episodes

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SeasonEpisodesOriginally airedRankViewership
(millions)
First airedLast aired
110January 19, 2020 (2020-01-19)March 9, 2020 (2020-03-09)259.09[18]
214January 18, 2021 (2021-01-18)May 24, 2021 (2021-05-24)158.71[19]
318January 3, 2022 (2022-01-03)May 16, 2022 (2022-05-16)207.43[20]
418January 24, 2023 (2023-01-24)May 16, 2023 (2023-05-16)355.73[21]

Production

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Development

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On May 12, 2019, it was announced that Fox had given the production a series order for a 9-1-1 spin-off. 9-1-1 creator Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, and Tim Minear would serve as executive producers along with cast member Rob Lowe.[6] Angela Bassett, who starred in the original 9-1-1 serves as an executive producer. Writer John Owen Lowe, son of Rob Lowe, also works on the show's writing team.[22][23]

On April 13, 2020, Fox renewed the series for a second season which premiered on January 18, 2021.[24][25] On May 17, 2021, Fox renewed the series for a third season which premiered January 3, 2022.[26][27] On May 16, 2022, Fox renewed the series for a fourth season which premiered on January 24, 2023.[2][3] On May 1, 2023, Fox renewed the series for a fifth season.[4] On November 15, 2023, it was announced that the fifth season of 9-1-1: Lone Star was pushed to fall 2024, amid the 2023 Writers Guild of America strike and the 2023 SAG-AFTRA strike.[28]

Casting

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On May 12, 2019, it was announced that Rob Lowe had been cast in the series as lead role.[6] On September 11, 2019, Liv Tyler was announced to star opposite of Lowe.[7] Jim Parrack joined the cast on September 18, 2019.[10] Two days later, Ronen Rubinstein and Sierra McClain were announced to have joined the cast.[8] On September 23, 2019, Natacha Karam, Brian Michael Smith, Rafael L. Silva, and Julian Works joined the cast.[11]

On September 3, 2020, Gina Torres was cast as a series regular for the second season.[29] On September 22, 2020, Liv Tyler departed the show prior to the second season. Tyler had been commuting between her London home and Los Angeles to film the show. Due to potential travel difficulties of the coronavirus pandemic and not wanting to be away from her young children for long, she asked producers to let her out of her multi-year contract. The possibility of her return was left open.[30] Lisa Edelstein was cast in a recurring role for the second season.[13] On October 8, 2020, Derek Webster joined the cast in a recurring capacity for the second season.[15] On May 25, 2021, Brianna Baker was promoted to series regular for the third season.[12] On September 28, 2022, Neal McDonough, D.B. Woodside, and Amanda Schull joined the cast in recurring capacities for the fourth season.[31]

On June 7, 2024 it was reported that original cast member, Sierra McClain, would not be returning as Grace Ryder ahead of the series' fifth season, due to a cast renegotiation dispute.[9]

Filming

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Despite being set in Austin, Texas, nearly all filming of the series occurs in Los Angeles, California.[32] The lack of on-location filming in Austin has prompted criticism from the local film industry, claiming that Austin has the production infrastructure to host the series.[33][34][35]

The fifth season started shooting in early March 2024,[36] and is scheduled to wrap in late July 2024.[37]

Reception

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Critical response

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On Rotten Tomatoes, the series' first season has an approval rating of 77% based on 13 reviews, with an average rating of 6.8/10. The website's critical consensus reads, "If not as outlandishly fun as its predecessor, 9-1-1: Lone Star still packs an entertaining punch and is a great showcase for the handsomely self-aware Rob Lowe."[38] On Metacritic, the season has a weighted average score of 67 out of 100 based on 8 critics' reviews, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[39]

Daniel D'Addario of Variety suggests that the series "started from the casting" but that it is not misconceived and is as solid as its predecessor, even if aspects of its conceit are "at times so utopian as to defy belief." He praises the "charismatic and inclusive ensemble" and hopes that the series will make use of them and not focus too much on its lead actor.[40] Daniel Fienberg of The Hollywood Reporter called the series fun and thrilling, stating its succeeds as a solid franchise companion, "full of explosions, infernos and death-defying stunts, but most of it is delivered in the attempted service of a more complicated series of character studies, an admirable goal not always smoothly executed."[41] Kelly Lawler of USA Today praised the ensemble cast, and said that producers Minear and Falchuck have "clearly tapped into what worked in "9-1-1," transplanted it easily to Texas and found a way to give "Lone Star" a tone and atmosphere all its own."[42] Brian Tallerico of RogerEbert.com wrote: "There's something almost impressively brazen about the way these shows use melodrama, embracing it like old-fashioned soap opera writers."[43] Joel Keller of Decider said " If you loved 9-1-1, you'll love this show." Keller praised the performances of the actors and the action sequences, complimented the dialogue and the development of the characters.[44]

Amanda Bell of TV Guide rated Lone Star 3.5 out of 5 and stated the series manages to find its own identity without duplicating 9-1-1, called the series inclusive through the diversity of the characters, and said the series celebrates Texas's culture.[45] Melissa Camacho of Common Sense Media rated the series 3 out of 5 stars, complimented the depiction of positive messages and role models, stating the series highlights friendship, teamwork, and community across its characters, while noting the diverse representations.[46]

Sean O'Neal of Texas Monthly criticized the show for its stereotypical portrayal of Texas, and the "baffling" choice of Austin for a conservative Texas setting.[47]

Ratings

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Viewership and ratings per season of 9-1-1: Lone Star
Season Timeslot (ET) Episodes First aired Last aired TV season Viewership
rank
Avg. viewers
(millions)
18–49
rank
Avg. 18–49
rating
Date Viewers
(millions)
Date Viewers
(millions)
1 Monday 8:00 p.m.[g] 10 January 19, 2020 (2020-01-19) 11.41[48] March 9, 2020 (2020-03-09) 5.38[49] 2019–20 24 9.09 13 1.8[50]
2 Monday 9:00 p.m. 14 January 18, 2021 (2021-01-18) 6.03[51] May 24, 2021 (2021-05-24) 5.21[52] 2020–21 15 8.71 11 1.5[53]
3 Monday 8:00 p.m. (1–10)
Monday 9:00 p.m. (11–18)
18 January 3, 2022 (2022-01-03) 5.50[54] May 16, 2022 (2022-05-16) 4.63[55] 2021–22 20 7.43 16 1.0[20]
4 Tuesday 8:00 p.m. 18 January 24, 2023 (2023-01-24) 3.92[56] May 16, 2023 (2023-05-16) 3.32[57] 2022–23 35 5.73 25 0.8[21]

Accolades

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Award Year Category Nominee(s) Result Ref.
BMI Film & TV Awards 2020 BMI TV Music Award Mac Quayle Won [58][59]
GLAAD Media Awards 2021 Outstanding Drama Series 9-1-1: Lone Star Nominated [60]
2022 Outstanding Drama Series 9-1-1: Lone Star Nominated [61]
2023 Outstanding Drama Series 9-1-1: Lone Star Won [62][63]
Hollywood Critics Association TV Awards 2022 Best Broadcast Network Series, Drama 9-1-1: Lone Star Nominated [64]
Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards 2022 Outstanding Stunt Coordination for a Drama Series, Limited or Anthology Series or Movie Buddy Sosthand Nominated [65]
ReFrame Stamp 2021 IMDbPro Top 200 Scripted TV Recipients 9-1-1: Lone Star Won [66]
Visual Effects Society Awards 2022 Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode Brigitte Bourque, Tyler Deck, Jason Gottlieb, Josephine Noh, and Elia Popov (for "Hold the Line") Nominated [67]

Explanatory notes

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  1. ^ Known as 20th Century Fox Television in season 1.
  2. ^ Silva is credited as Rafael Silva in seasons 1–2 and as Rafael L. Silva from season 3.
  3. ^ Formerly portrayed by Lexi Crouch.
  4. ^ Formerly portrayed by Xandi Crouch.
  5. ^ Later portrayed by Kelsey Yates.
  6. ^ Later portrayed by Skyler Yates.
  7. ^ The series premiere aired outside of its regular timeslot, on Sunday at 10:00 p.m.

References

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  1. ^ "Fox Brings Back The Masked Singer This Fall, Then Will Debut Season 3 After Super Bowl LIV". Adweek. May 13, 2019. Archived from the original on May 13, 2019. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  2. ^ a b Ausiello, Michael (May 16, 2022). "Fox Renewals: Call Me Kat, Lone Star Among 5 Pickups—What About The Resident and OG 9-1-1?". TVLine. Archived from the original on May 16, 2022. Retrieved May 16, 2022.
  3. ^ a b Ausiello, Michael (January 6, 2023). "Resident (Series?) Finale Split Over 2 Weeks, 9-1-1: Lone Star Return Delayed as Fox Tweaks Midseason Rollout". TVLine. Archived from the original on February 2, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  4. ^ a b Andreeva, Nellie (May 1, 2023). "'9-1-1: Lone Star' Renewed For Season 5 By Fox". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved May 1, 2023.
  5. ^ Andrews, Neille (November 15, 2023). "'9-1-1: Lone Star' Season 5 Pushed To Fall As Strikes' Impact On Broadcast Continues". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved March 17, 2024.
  6. ^ a b c Lannuci, Rebecca (May 12, 2019). "9-1-1 Spinoff Lone Star Scores Series Order at Fox, Rob Lowe to Star". TVLine. Archived from the original on May 13, 2019. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  7. ^ a b Andreeva, Nellie (September 11, 2019). "Liv Tyler Set As the Female Lead Of Fox's '9-1-1: Lone Star' Spinoff Series". Deadline. Archived from the original on September 12, 2019. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  8. ^ a b c Andreeva, Nellie (September 20, 2019). "'9-1-1: Lone Star': Ronen Rubinstein & Sierra McClain Land Leads In Fox's Spinoff Series". Deadline. Archived from the original on September 20, 2019. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  9. ^ a b Andreeva, Nellie (June 7, 2024). "'9-1-1: Lone Star' May Be Coming To An End; Original Cast Member Exits Fox Drama Ahead Of Season 5". Deadline.
  10. ^ a b Andreeva, Nellie (September 18, 2019). "'9-1-1: Lone Star': Jim Parrack Cast In Fox Spinoff Series". Deadline. Archived from the original on September 20, 2019. Retrieved September 18, 2019.
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  13. ^ a b Andreeva, Nellie (September 25, 2020). "Lisa Edelstein Joins '9-1-1: Lone Star' As Recurring, Will Return To 'The Kominsky Method' For Final Season". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on September 25, 2020. Retrieved September 25, 2020.
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  15. ^ a b Andreeva, Nellie (October 8, 2020). "Derek Webster To Recur On Fox's '9-1-1: Lone Star', JR Bourne On Netflix's 'On the Verge'". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on November 1, 2020. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  16. ^ Krug, Kurt Anthony (February 21, 2022). "Amy Acker on Her Recurring Role on '9-1-1: Lone Star'". ShowbizJunkies. Archived from the original on February 2, 2023. Retrieved April 27, 2022. it's been way too long since we've worked together. And I had a feeling Rob and Amy would have chemistry.
  17. ^ "(NLS-204) "Friends with Benefits"". The Futon Critic. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  18. ^ Porter, Rick (June 4, 2020). "TV Ratings: 7-Day Season Averages for Every 2019-20 Broadcast Series". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on June 5, 2020. Retrieved June 8, 2020.
  19. ^ Porter, Rick (June 8, 2021). "2020-21 TV Ratings: Complete 7-Day Ratings for Broadcast Network Series". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on June 9, 2021.
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  21. ^ a b Porter, Rick (June 7, 2023). "TV Ratings 2022-23: Final Seven-Day Averages for Every Network Series". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved September 14, 2023.
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  23. ^ Ruth Kinane (May 3, 2021). "Rob Lowe, brother Chad, and son John Owen talk working together on '9-1-1: Lone Star'". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on February 2, 2023. Retrieved March 17, 2022.
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  36. ^ Kimathi, Denis (March 5, 2024). "'9-1-1: Lone Star' Is Back in Business as Season 5 Begins Production". Collider. Retrieved June 8, 2024.
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  43. ^ Tallerico, Brian (January 17, 2020). "9-1-1 Becomes a Franchise with Lone Star Version". RogerEbert.com. Archived from the original on February 2, 2023. Retrieved July 26, 2022.
  44. ^ Keller, Joel (January 20, 2020). "Stream It Or Skip It: '9-1-1: Lone Star' On Fox, Where Rob Lowe And Liv Tyler Rescue People In Austin". Decider. Archived from the original on February 2, 2023. Retrieved July 18, 2022.
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