2020 coronavirus pandemic in New York (state)

The 2020 coronavirus pandemic in New York is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The first case of COVID-19 in New York was confirmed on March 1.[4] As of April 1, 2020, there have been 83,712 confirmed cases in the state,[2][5] and of those 2,219 people have died. New York has the highest number of confirmed cases of any state in the United States, with five times as many cases as neighboring New Jersey, the state with the second most confirmed cases. Nearly 45 percent of known national cases are in the state,[6] with one quarter of total known US cases being in New York City.[7]

2020 coronavirus pandemic in
the state of New York
New York National Guard (49677711431).jpg
A testing center in Staten Island
COVID-19 outbreak New York per capita cases map.svg
Confirmed cases per 10,000 inhabitants by county
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationNew York state, U.S.
Index caseManhattan
Arrival dateFebruary 22, 2020[1]
Confirmed cases83,712[2][3]
Recovered6,142
Deaths
2,219
Official website
coronavirus.health.ny.gov

TimelineEdit

COVID-19 cases in New York State, United States  ()
     Deaths        Active cases
Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-03-01
1 0
2020-03-02
1 0
2020-03-03
2(+100.0%) 0
2020-03-04
11(+450.0%) 0
2020-03-05
22(+100.0%) 0
2020-03-06
44(+100.0%) 0
2020-03-07
89(+102.3%) 0
2020-03-08
105(+18.0%) 0
2020-03-09
142(+35.2%) 0
2020-03-10
173(+21.8%) 0
2020-03-11
216(+24.9%) 0
2020-03-12
325(+50.5%) 0
2020-03-13
421(+29.5%) 0
2020-03-14
613(+45.6%) 2
2020-03-15
729(+18.9%) 3(+50.0%)
2020-03-16
950(+30.3%) 7(+133.3%)
2020-03-17
1,374(+44.6%) 12(+71.4%)
2020-03-18
2,480(+80.5%) 16(+33.3%)
2020-03-19
5,711(+130.3%) 38(+137.5%)
2020-03-20
8,402(+47.1%) 46(+21.1%)
2020-03-21
10,356(+23.3%) 58(+26.1%)
2020-03-22
15,168(+46.5%) 76(+31.0%)
2020-03-23
20,875(+37.6%) 157(+106.6%)
2020-03-24
25,665(+22.9%) 271(+72.6%)
2020-03-25
30,811(+20.1%) 285(+5.2%)
2020-03-26
37,258(+20.9%) 385(+35.1%)
2020-03-27
44,635(+19.8%) 519(+34.8%)
2020-03-28
52,318(+17.2%) 728(+40.3%)
2020-03-29
59,513(+13.8%) 965(+32.6%)
2020-03-30
66,497(+11.7%) 1,218(+26.2%)
2020-03-31
75,795(+14.0%) 1,550(+27.3%)
2020-04-01
83,712(+10.5%) 1,941(+25.2%)
Cases: The number of cases confirmed in New York State.
Sources: News reports cited inline, as well as state health reports.

March 1 saw the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in New York, a 39-year-old woman health care worker who lived in Manhattan.[8] She had returned from Iran on February 25 and had no symptoms at the time. She went into home isolation with her husband.[9] On March 3, a second case was confirmed, a lawyer in his 50s who lives in New Rochelle, Westchester County, immediately north of New York City, and works in Midtown Manhattan.[10] He had traveled to Miami in February and regularly visited Israel, but had not visited areas known to have widespread transmission of the coronavirus. Two of his four children had recently returned from Israel. After first feeling ill on February 22, he was admitted to a hospital in Westchester on February 27 and diagnosed with pneumonia, and released from isolation after testing negative for the flu.[1][11] Instances of panic buying in New York were reported after this case was confirmed.[12]

On March 4, the number of cases in New York increased to 11 as nine people linked to the lawyer tested as positive, including his wife, a son, a daughter, a neighbor, and a friend and his family.[13] On March 5, Mayor de Blasio says that coronavirus fears should not keep New Yorkers off the subway, riding from Fulton Street to High Street in a public press attempt to demonstrate the subway's safety.[14] On March 6, eleven new cases were reported bringing the state caseload to 33.[15] All the new cases were tied to the first community transmission case, the lawyer.[16] At the end of the day, an additional 11 new cases were reported by the governor, bringing the total caseload to 44, with 8 of the new cases in Westchester County, and 3 in Nassau County on Long Island.[17] Also on March 6, an article appeared in the New York Post stating that while Mayor de Blasio assigned responsibility for the lack of N95 masks and other personal protective equipment to the federal government, the city never ordered the supplies until that date.[18]

 
Location of the New Rochelle Containment Area within Westchester County, New York
 
National Guard personnel disinfect the dais of New Rochelle City Hall.

On March 7, Governor Andrew Cuomo declared a state of emergency in New York after 89 cases had been confirmed in the state, 70 of them in Westchester County, 12 in New York City and 7 elsewhere.[19] On March 8, the state reported 16 new confirmed cases and a total of 106 cases statewide.[20] New York City issued new commuter guidelines amid the current outbreak, asking sick individuals to stay off public transit, encouraging citizens to avoid densely packed buses, subways, or trains.[21]

On March 9, New York City mayor Bill de Blasio announced that there were 16 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in New York City.[22] On March 10, Governor Cuomo announced a containment zone in the city of New Rochelle from March 12 to 25.[23]

On March 11, Cuomo announced that the City University of New York and State University of New York schools would be closed for the following week, from March 12 to 19. These college systems would move most classes to an online-based system starting March 19 and continuing through the rest of the spring semester. Dormitories will remain open for students "who cannot return home for hardship reasons."[24]

On March 11, a man in Monroe County tested positive, making it the first county in Western New York to have a COVID-19 case.[25] Officials say he flew into JFK from Italy, traveled on a Greyhound bus from Manhattan to Rochester, and arrived locally the morning of March 10. The bus continued on to Buffalo and Toronto.[26] On March 12, the first two cases were confirmed in Albany County, leading Albany mayor Kathy Sheehan to suspend the annual St. Patrick's Day parade.[27] The same day, a staff member at Union College tested positive for coronavirus in Schenectady County, marking the county's first case.[28]

On March 13, Herkimer County saw its first confirmed case but declined to disclose the patient's location. The patient later was revealed to have been from the Mohawk/Ilion area, just south of Herkimer, the county seat.[29] On March 14, the first two fatalities in the state occurred. An 82-year-old woman in Brooklyn with pre-existing emphysema died in the hospital.[30] A 65-year-old person with other significant health problems who had not previously been tested for COVID-19 died at their home in Suffern, Rockland County.[31] It was also announced that three people in Erie County tested positive for COVID-19.[32]

On March 15, the third fatality in the state was announced. A 79-year-old woman with underlying health issues, who had been admitted to a New York City hospital, died.[33] On March 16, Clinton County reported its first case, at CVPH Medical Center in Plattsburgh. No further information has been revealed about the patient.[34] As of March 23, 2020, there were 125 deaths in NYC, and 157 statewide.[35] Three of those deaths were of persons under 44 years of age.[36] The number of confirmed cases increased by 4,000 between March 22 and 23, which brought the total number of confirmed cases statewide to nearly 21,000.[37] 12,305 of these are in NYC.[38] On March 24, Cuomo stated that "The apex is higher than we thought and the apex is sooner than we thought." He warned there was not enough assistance from the federal government and that the state had 25,000 cases and at least 210 deaths.[39] 211 NYPD officers and civilian employees have tested positive for Covid-19. In total, 2,774 NYPD employees, 7.6 percent of the workforce, are sick.[40]

On March 26, Cuomo announced that the state would allow two patients to share one ventilator using a technique he called "splitting" where a second set of tubes would be added to the ventilator. COVID-19 patients need ventilators for between 11 and 21 days, while under normal circumstances patients usually only require them for three to four days. He also said the state was considering converting anesthesia machines to use as ventilators.[41] Between March 25 and March 26, there were 100 deaths statewide, with the number of hospitalized patients increasing by 40 percent in NYC.[42]

ChallengesEdit

Shortage of protective gearEdit

After trying to purchase 200,000 N95 masks on February 7, the Office of Emergency Management learned that vendors were out of stock. Emergency provisions of masks and hand sanitizers did not arrive until early March. According to The New York Post, one medical supply vendor with standing city contracts said that the initial requests for protective gear from the Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS) were bogged down by inefficient bureaucratic delays. One vendor said, "We'd send them a list of products we can deliver within 24, 48 hours", but on average it took 72 hours for the agency to place an order. He added "the city just moves so slow" when there was very high demand coming from hospitals and the private sector. According to the contractor, eight out of 10 supply orders could not be filled because DCAS did not pay on time, which a spokeswoman for NYC denied. The office of the comptroller approved 12 contracts with a total value of $150 million before the mayor's office took over the process on March 16. Mayor Bill de Blasio has said that the city may run out of supplies by April if the federal government does not send 3 million N95 masks, 50 million surgical masks, 15,000 ventilators and 45 million surgical gowns, gloves, and face shields.[43]

One EMS worker expressed frustration at being asked to wear the less effective surgical masks.[44] The police union filed a complaint on March 13 due to NYPD officers not being given masks and other protective gear. A spokeswoman called the Police Benevolent Association's complaint "empty rhetoric".[45]

Overcrowded hospitalEdit

The situation at Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens has been described by one of the doctors there as "apocalyptic".[46] As elsewhere, family members of coronavirus patients are not allowed in the hospital.[47] On March 25, several news outlets reported the hospital was at its "breaking point" after 13 patients died within a 24-hour period.[48][49]

Paramedic shortageEdit

On March 28, The New York Times reported that the city's 911 emergency response system was "overwhelmed" due to the large number of coronavirus patients needing transport to the hospital. Dispatchers received more than 7,000 calls on March 26, a record since the September 11 attacks. Emergency workers had to decide which cases to prioritize and some patients were being left at home without medical care. In addition, paramedics lacked sufficient protective gear.[50]

Government responseEdit

 
Disinfection of New York City Subway cars against coronavirus
 
On March 22, New York City closed all playing courts to group play

MarchEdit

On March 2, Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted that people should ignore the virus and "go on with your lives + get out on the town despite Coronavirus".[51] At a news conference on March 3, New York City Commissioner of Health Oxiris Barbot said "We are encouraging New Yorkers to go about their everyday lives".[52]

The following day, at another news conference, authorities described the epidemic caused by the virus and the pandemic as "caused by fear" and reassuring the public that the situation would be under control given the capabilities of New York's health care system.[53]

On March 7, a State of Emergency was declared by Governor Andrew Cuomo.[54] On March 8, the Governor called for private testing due to demand outpacing the ability to test. The Governor called on the CDC to approve private testing and also approve automated testing.[55] Responding to the rush on hand sanitizer buying in the state and reported price gouging, Cuomo revealed on March 9 that the state would begin producing its own hand sanitizers, manufactured by prisoners in the state's correctional system.[56]

A number of schools and school districts announced closings or schedule modifications by March 8 due to the impact of the virus.[57][55] Additionally, all school trips were cancelled for those in New York City.[55]

On March 12, Cuomo announced restrictions on mass gatherings, directing events with more than 500 people to be cancelled or postponed and any gathering with less than 500 people in attendance to cut capacity by 50 percent. In addition, only medically necessary visits would be allowed at nursing homes.[58]

Cuomo announced that all Broadway theatres have been ordered to shut down at 5 p.m. that day, and that public gatherings in congregate spaces with more than 500 people were prohibited beginning 5 p.m. the following day. Broadway theatres are scheduled to reopen on April 13. Until then, the legal capacity of any venue with a capacity of 500 people or less was also reduced by half to discourage large gatherings.[59]

 
Shelves cleared of paper towels in a Walden supermarket on March 13 after school closings were announced.

As part of the announcement, Cuomo waived the requirement that schools be open for 180 days that year in order to be eligible for state aid. The next day, all public school districts in Dutchess, Orange, and Ulster counties in the Mid-Hudson Valley, which had reported their first cases earlier in the week, announced they would close for the next two weeks. The Warwick schools in Orange County added that they would remain closed through April 14, when their annual spring break would normally end.[60]

On March 13, all public schools in Herkimer County announced they, too, would close until April 14. The county B.O.C.E.S. program and all its participating school districts' superintendents met and unanimously voted for the decision less than a day after the first confirmed case had been announced in the county.[61][62] That day, pressure from the teachers union (reported as "furious" about the schools remaining opened) and some city council members, was mounting on the Mayor of New York City to close schools. De Blasio stated that he will keep the schools open, citing the need for meal programs to continue and child care to continue, Los Angeles and Chicago had closed their schools at the end of the prior week.[63]

The state's Civil Service Department postponed exams scheduled for the weekend of March 14–15.[64]

 
New York Army National Guard personnel register people at a COVID-19 Mobile Testing Center in Glen Island Park, New Rochelle

On March 13, drive-through testing began in New Rochelle, Westchester County.[65]

 
Closed dining area at the Scotchtown QuickChek

On March 15, Cuomo announced that New York City schools would close the following day through April 20, and gave the city 24 hours to come up with a plan for child care and food.[66][67] Public schools in Westchester, Suffolk, and Nassau would close on March 16 and stay closed for two weeks.[68] New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio also announced that all schools, bars, and restaurants in the city were to be closed starting 9 a.m. on March 17 except for food takeout and delivery.[69]

All 62 counties in New York state had declared states of emergency by March 16.[citation needed] On March 16, facing a similar crisis, the State of California took action. Citing a total of 258 confirmed cases in the seven counties, the Public health officers of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, and Santa Clara counties announced, with the City of Berkeley, a legal order directing their respective residents to shelter at home for three weeks.[70] Many[who?] expected that New York City would take similar action.[citation needed]

On March 17, as the number of confirmed cases rose to 814 citywide, de Blasio announced that the city was considering a similar shelter-in-place order within the next 48 hours. Across the boroughs of New York City, there were 277 confirmed cases in Manhattan, 248 in Queens, 157 in Brooklyn, 96 in the Bronx, and 36 in Staten Island. Seven city residents had died of the virus.[71] Mayor Bill de Blasio's comments were quickly rebuked by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's office, and again later by the governor himself in an interview with CNN's Jake Tapper.[72] Melissa DeRosa, secretary to the governor, issued a statement during the mayor's briefing, clarifying state government is not considering shelter-in-place orders at the time.[71] Governor Andrew Cuomo said later Tuesday morning, "We hear 'New York City is going to quarantine itself.' That is not true. That cannot happen. It cannot happen legally. No city in the state can quarantine itself without state approval. And I have no interest whatsoever and no plan whatsoever to quarantine any city."[73]

 
Social distancing advisory sign at ShopRite, Montgomery

On March 18, Cuomo reaffirmed that he would not approve a “shelter-in-place” order for New York City. “That is not going to happen, shelter in place, for New York City,” Cuomo said, “For any city or county to take an emergency action, the state has to approve it. And I wouldn’t approve shelter in place.”[74] He also announced that nearly 5,000 tests were administered on March 17 alone, raising the total number to 14,597 people tested. Cuomo suggested that this may in part have led to the jump in confirmed cases to 2,382 statewide,[75] including 1,871 cases in New York City.[76] Also on March 18, the Department of Defense said the Navy's hospital ship USNS Comfort is being prepared for deployment in New York, "to assist potentially overwhelmed communities with acute patient care".[77]

On March 20, de Blasio called for drastic measures to combat the coronavirus outbreak. "We have to go to a shelter-in-place model," he said, praising California's "stay at home" model for sheltering in place.[72] Cuomo announced the statewide stay-at-home order with a mandate that all non-essential workers work from home.[78] On the same day, President Donald Trump declared that major emergency existed in the state of New York, and ordered that Federal assistance be rendered to assist state and local recovery efforts.[79]

On March 22, Trump announced that he had directed Federal Emergency Management Agency to provide four large federal medical stations with 1,000 beds for New York.[80] On March 23, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced a plan to use convalescent antibody-rich blood plasma, as a stopgap measure for the disease.[81] On March 24, Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, advised people who have left New York City to self-quarantine for 14 days.[82] On March 29, 2020, CBS News reporter Maria Mercader, a New York City resident, died from a COVID-19 related illness.[83][84]

 
Social distancing markers on the floor of the Newburgh Walmart

On March 26, Trump announced that USNS Comfort will be heading up to New York City to assist local hospitals. The ship departed on March 28 and arrived at Pier 90 of the Manhattan Cruise Terminal on March 30.[85][86] On March 27, the United States, with a confirmed 111,980 known cases surpasses Italy and China to become the country with the most coronavirus COVID-19 cases in the world—more than 52,000 of these cases are reported in New York State alone.[87] On that same day, Governor Cuomo announced all schools statewide would remain further closed until at least April 15.[88]

On March 28, Cuomo announced that New York State's 2020 Democratic Primary, originally scheduled for April 28, will be postponed until June 23.[89] President Donald Trump said that he is considering imposing an "enforceable" quarantine on New York. He later announced: "On the recommendation of the White House CoronaVirus Task Force, and upon consultation with the Governor’s of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, I have asked the @CDCgov to issue a strong Travel Advisory, to be administered by the Governors, in consultation with the Federal Government. A quarantine will not be necessary."[90] Governor Cuomo threatened Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo with a lawsuit over a new state quarantine policy, which would make sure people from New York would self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in Rhode Island.[91] On March 29, Raimondo repealed the order that specifically referred to New Yorkers, and broadened it to include any out-of-state traveller entering Rhode Island with intent to stay.[92]

Cuomo also on March 28 ordered all nonessential construction sites in the state to shut down. This led the developers of the Legoland park under construction in Goshen to postpone their planned July 4 opening date until 2021. A specific date was not set but Orange County's director of tourism expected it would probably be the normal April opening date.[93]

 
Plastic shield erected to prevent disease transmission at convenience store cash register

In March 2020, the U.S. Army dispatched soldiers from Army Corps of Engineers field hospitals in Fort Campbell, Kentucky, and Fort Hood, Texas to New York City to convert New York City's Javits Convention Center into a 2910-bed civilian medical hospital.[94] More medical hospitals will be set up by these Army officers in New York City as well.[94] On March 30, 2020, the U.S. Navy medical ship USNS Comfort arrived in New York City to assist with non-COVID operations, relieving land hospitals to stop the city's growing COVID-19 pandemic.[95] It was later announced that field hospitals would be set up in Central Park and at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Queens.[96] On March 31, it was revealed that Andrew Cuomo's brother Chris, a New York City resident and CNN journalist, had been diagnosed with COVID-19, and that New York City saw its first COVID-19 related death involving a child.[97][98]

AprilEdit

The ban on large gatherings meant that the annual "First Cast" ceremony at the Junction Pool, a popular fly fishing spot, in the Sullivan County hamlet of Roscoe, marking the April 1 opening of trout season, could not be held. The season is still open and the state's Department of Environmental Conservation encouraged anglers to take to the state's streams as long as they continued to practice social distancing. Many stores in Roscoe that catered to them were nevertheless closed and limited to filling orders online.[99]

State of emergencyEdit

All 62 counties in New York State had declared states of emergency by March 16.

  1. ^ a b c d e As part of a citywide state of emergency in New York City
  2. ^ Borough of Brooklyn
  3. ^ Borough of Manhattan
  4. ^ Borough of Staten Island

Infected legislatorsEdit

Four members of the State AssemblyCharles Barron, Kimberly Jean-Pierre, Brian Miller, and Helene Weinstein—have been diagnosed with COVID-19;[146] since March 20, Miller has been in the intensive care unit at St. Luke's Hospital in Utica.[147] On March 30, Jim Seward became the first state senator to test positive for the virus; his case was mild and he is expected to recover.[148]

Effect on communitiesEdit

 
Best Buy was only letting a limited number of people into their Union Square store in New York City, March 18, 2020

Lack of enforcement of self-quarantine policiesEdit

Self-quarantines for persons who test positive or are symptomatic are not enforced due to a lack of resources. Several New York City area nurses have expressed concerns that patients are not complying with self-quarantine guidelines due to financial necessity or fear of losing their jobs. A New York State Nurses Association board member has expressed concerns that low-income patients who share rooms with other individuals may not be able to effectively self-isolate at their residences.[149]

Difficulties of implementation in Hasidic communitiesEdit

Implementing social distancing has been difficult in some communities dominated by Hasidic Jews. The Orange County village of Kiryas Joel, home to 25,000 Satmar Hasidim, closed all 100 of its synagogues, as well as schools and mikvahs on March 19, despite the centrality of religious observance in the community. It is estimated that 25–28 percent of its residents have tested positive, including the community's spiritual leader, Grand Rebbe Aaron Teitelbaum.[150] On March 27 the county reported that Kiryas Joel, as the town of Palm Tree, had 234 confirmed cases, the most of any municipality in the county.[151]

Some other reports have suggested that the Hasidic community has generally been slow to implement measures designed to slow the spread of the virus. This has reportedly led to one antisemitic incident. On March 23 a car dealership near Kiryas Joel refused to service a resident's car, telling him he had the virus.[152]

An Orthodox Jewish physician, Dr. Vladimir Zelenko, who sees patients at his offices in both Kiryas Joel and Monsey, another predominantly Hasidic community in nearby Rockland County, claims that the real infection rate in Kiryas Joel is much higher, claims that have been disputed by local authorities. Zelenko, who must self-isolate since he is missing a lung, says in daily YouTube videos he posts that his office has treated 500 patients (mostly in Kiryas Joel) for COVID-19, using the combination of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin or zinc sulfate, which has in some trials yielded positive results in reducing symptoms. Zelenko claimed that 90 percent of the Hasidic community will become infected; the county's health commissioner and the village's emergency services department disputed that, pointing out that it was based on nine positive results out of 14 samples.[152]

PoliceEdit

According to New York City Police Commissioner Dermot F. Shea, crime has decreased sharply during the epidemic although there is concern that domestic violence is not being reported.[153] As of 31 March, more than a thousand police officers have tested positive and 15% (5,600) are currently on sick leave.[154]

Effects on sportsEdit

Most of state's sports teams were affected. Major League Baseball cancelled the remainder of spring training on March 12, and on March 16, they announced that the season will be postponed indefinitely, after the recommendations from the CDC to restrict events of more than 50 people for the next eight weeks, affecting the New York Yankees and New York Mets.[155] The National Basketball Association suspended the season for 30 days starting March 12, affecting the New York Knicks and Brooklyn Nets.[156] The National Hockey League season was suspended indefinitely on March 12, affecting the New York Rangers, New York Islanders, and Buffalo Sabres.[157] Major League Soccer postponed the season for 30 days starting March 12, affecting the New York Red Bulls and New York City FC.[158] On March 12, the National Lacrosse League postponed the remainder of their season until further notice, affecting the seasons of the Buffalo Bandits, Rochester Knighthawks, and New York Riptide.[159] The XFL suspended its season on March 12, affecting the inaugural season of the New York Guardians.[160]

In college sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association cancelled all winter and spring tournaments, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[161] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association also canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[162]

On March 17, four members of the Brooklyn Nets, including Kevin Durant, were confirmed positive for COVID-19.[163]

The state's high school basketball playoffs had begun in early March with no spectators allowed. On March 12 the New York State Public High School Athletic Association suspended remaining winter sports championship contests in all sports that still had not decided them: boys' and girls' basketball, ice hockey and bowling.[164]

StatisticsEdit

COVID-19 cases in New York[165]

Confirmed cases updated 3:10 p.m. EST, April 1, 2020[166]

County Confirmed
cases
Deaths Recoveries County
population
(2010)
Albany 240 2 0 304,204
Allegany 10 1 0 48,946
Broome[167] 41 4 6 200,600
Cattaraugus[168] 7 0 0 80,317
Cayuga 4[169] 0 2 80,026
Chautauqua[170] 10 1 2 134,905
Chemung 22 0 0 88,830
Chenango 26 0 0 50,477
Clinton 25 0 0 82,128
Columbia 36 1 0 63,096
Cortland 11 0 3 49,336
Delaware 20 0 0 47,980
Dutchess 547 4 0 297,488
Erie[171] 582 11 74 919,040
Essex 6 0 0 39,370
Franklin 9 0 0 51,599
Fulton 2 0 0 55,531
Genesee 13 1 0 60,079
Greene 18 0 0 49,221
Hamilton 2 0 0 4,836
Herkimer 20 3 0 64,519
Jefferson 12 0 0 116,229
Lewis 2 0 0 27,087
Livingston[172] 18 1 2 65,393
Madison 60 2 0 73,442
Monroe 357 9 100 744,344
Montgomery 7 0 0 50,219
Nassau 9,554 63 0 1,339,532
Niagara[173] 65 0 11 216,469
Oneida 50 1 0 234,878
Onondaga 277 1 67 467,026
Ontario 27 0 0 107,931
Orange 1,782 25 0 372,813
Orleans 6 0 0 42,883
Oswego 17 0 0 122,109
Otsego 19 1 0 62,259
Putnam 207 0 0 99,710
Rensselaer 60[174] 0 6 159,429
Rockland 3,321 18[175] 0 311,687
Saratoga 122 1 0 219,607
Schenectady 93 2 0 154,727
Schoharie 8 0 0 32,749
Schuyler 2 0 0 18,343
Seneca 2 0 0 35,251
St. Lawrence 34 0 0 111,944
Steuben 40 0 0 98,990
Suffolk 7,605 53 1 1,493,350
Sullivan 121 1[176] 0 77,547
Tioga 7 0 0 51,125
Tompkins 80 0 33 101,564
Ulster 221 3 0 182,493
Warren 18 0 0 65,707
Washington 10 0 0 63,216
Wayne 24 0 0 93,772
Westchester 10,683 25 0 949,113
Wyoming 10 1 0 42,155
Yates 1[177] 0 0 25,348
Total (outside New York City) 36,299 845 240
New York City 47,439 1,374 2 8,175,133
Total (statewide) 83,738 2,219 242 19,378,102
Confirmed COVID-19 cases in New York State over time
Date Rest of state New York City Statewide Percent change
March 7, 2020[178] 65 11 76 N/A
March 8, 2020[179] 93 12 105 38.16%
March 9, 2020[180] 123 19 142 35.24%
March 10, 2020[181] 137 36 173 21.83%
March 11, 2020[182] 164 52 216 24.86%
March 12, 2020[183] 230 95 325 50.46%
March 13, 2020[184] 267 154 421 29.54%
March 14, 2020[185] 344 269 613 45.61%
March 15, 2020[186] 400 329 729 18.92%
March 16, 2020 487 463 950 30.32%
March 17, 2020[187] 730 644 1,374 44.63%
March 18, 2020[188] 1,043 1,339 2,382 73.36%
March 19, 2020[189] 1,683 2,469 4,152 74.31%
March 20, 2020 2,694 4,408 7,102 71.05%
March 21, 2020[190] 4,145 6,211 10,356 45.82%
March 22, 2020 6,123 9,045 15,168 46.47%
March 23, 2020[191] 8,570 12,305 20,875 37.63%
March 24, 2020[192] 10,761 14,904 25,665 22.95%
March 25, 2020[193] 12,955 17,856 30,811 20.05%
March 26, 2020[194] 15,865 21,393 37,258 20.92%
March 27, 2020[195] 19,237 25,398 44,635 19.80%
March 28, 2020[196] 22,552 29,766 52,318 17.21%
March 29, 2020[197] 25,745 33,768 59,513 13.75%
March 30, 2020[198] 29,044 37,453 66,497 11.74%
March 31, 2020[199] 32,656 43,139 75,795 13.98%
April 1, 2020[200] 36,273 47,439 83,712 10.44%

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Goldstein, Joseph; McKinley, Jesse (March 4, 2020). "Second Case of Coronavirus in N.Y. Sets Off Search for Others Exposed". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 8, 2020. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases". Department of Health. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 21, 2020.
  3. ^ "Operations Dashboard for ArcGIS". Archived from the original on September 5, 2019. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  4. ^ "Second Case of Coronavirus in N.Y. Sets Off Search for Others Exposed". The New York Times. March 4, 2020. Archived from the original on March 8, 2020.
  5. ^ "Cuomo says coronavirus is 'more dangerous' than expected as New York cases jump 14% overnight to 75,795". CNBC. March 31, 2020. Retrieved March 31, 2020.
  6. ^ "NBC News twitter message". NBC News. March 23, 2020. Retrieved March 23, 2020. 5,707 new coronavirus cases in New York state, Gov. Cuomo announces, bringing state total to 20,875, representing more than half of all US cases
  7. ^ Perlstein, Mike (March 16, 2020). "New Orleans is second only to Seattle in COVID-19 cases per capita". 4WWL. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  8. ^ West, Melanie Grayce (March 2, 2020). "First Case of Coronavirus Confirmed in New York State". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Archived from the original on March 3, 2020. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  9. ^ Yan, Holly; Sgueglia, Kristina (March 2, 2020). "New York's first case of coronavirus is a health care worker, and officials say more cases are 'inevitable'". CNN. Archived from the original on March 4, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  10. ^ Bendix, Aria (March 7, 2020). "At least 28 coronavirus cases in New York are linked to one man — a 50-year-old attorney who works near Grand Central Terminal. Here's what we know". Business Insider. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  11. ^ Algar, Selim; Hogan, Bernadette; Henry, Jacob; Steinbuch, Yaron (March 3, 2020). "New York confirms second coronavirus case as Jewish schools close over virus fears". New York Post. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  12. ^ Misdary, Rosemary; Roberts, Georgett (March 4, 2020). "NYC shoppers panic with second case of coronavirus confirmed". New York Post. Archived from the original on March 5, 2020. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  13. ^ Hogan, Bernadette; Marsh, Julia; Feis, Aaron (March 4, 2020). "Five more New York coronavirus cases confirmed, bringing state total to 11". New York Post. Archived from the original on March 8, 2020. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  14. ^ Parnell, Wes; Shahrigian, Shant (March 5, 2020). "Mayor de Blasio says coronavirus fears shouldn't keep New Yorkers off subways". Daily News. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  15. ^ "Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) NY Dept of Public Health March 6th update". March 6, 2020. Archived from the original on March 6, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  16. ^ Millman, Jennifer (March 7, 2020). "New York COVID-19 Cases Surge to 45; Dozens Under Mandatory Quarantine Order". NBC New York. Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  17. ^ Cuomo, Andrew (March 6, 2020). "Update: We have learned of 11 new confirmed cases of #Coronavirus in NYS — bringing the total number of cases to 44. -8 of the new new cases are in Westchester County -3 of the new cases are in Nassau County We have expected the number of positive cases to go up as we test".
  18. ^ Marsh, Julia (March 20, 2020). "City Hall didn't secure 1st order of COVID-19 supplies for NYC until March 6". New York Post. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  19. ^ "Coronavirus in N.Y.: Cuomo Declares State of Emergency". The New York Times. March 8, 2020. Archived from the original on March 9, 2020.
  20. ^ Freytas-Tamura, Kimiko de (March 8, 2020). "Coronavirus in N.Y.: Cuomo Attacks C.D.C. Over Delays in Testing". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 9, 2020. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  21. ^ "NYC Issues New Commuter Guidelines to Combat Coronavirus Spread". NBC New York. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  22. ^ "Mayor: 16 Coronavirus Cases Confirmed in City". ny1.com. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  23. ^ "N.Y. Creates 'Containment Zone' in New Rochelle". nytimes.com. Archived from the original on March 10, 2020. Retrieved March 10, 2020.
  24. ^ "CUNY and SUNY Classes Will Be Held Online Because of Coronavirus". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 11, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2020.
  25. ^ "1st confirmed case of coronavirus in Monroe County, St. Patrick's Day Parade suspended". RochesterFirst. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 12, 2020.
  26. ^ Andreatta, David. "Rochester coronavirus rode Greyhound here from NYC". City Newspaper. Archived from the original on March 14, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  27. ^ "Albany County says there are 2 confirmed cases of coronavirus". WRGB. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 12, 2020.
  28. ^ "Union College staff member tests positive for coronavirus". WTEN. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 12, 2020.
  29. ^ "Individual test positive for coronavirus in Herkimer County". Times Telegram. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  30. ^ Croft, Jay. "First coronavirus-related death reported in New York". CNN. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  31. ^ "New York Reports 2nd COVID-19 Death as Tri-State Cases Surpass 600; New U.S. Travel Limits in Place". NBC New York. March 14, 2020. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  32. ^ "3 Erie County residents test positive for coronavirus, Cuomo says". WGRZ. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  33. ^ "Coronavirus Update: 3rd Death Linked To COVID-19, 79-Year-Old In New York City". CBS New York. March 15, 2020. Archived from the original on March 15, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  34. ^ Izzo, Elizabeth (March 16, 2020). "North Country's first COVID-19 case confirmed at Plattsburgh hospital". Adirondack Daily Enterprise. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  35. ^ "400 Ventilators Coming to NYC as Confirmed Coronavirus Cases Pass 13,000". March 23, 2020.
  36. ^ "20-Somethings Now Realizing That They Can Get Coronavirus, Too". The New York Times. March 23, 2020.
  37. ^ "Virus Cases Approaching 21,000 in N.Y.C." The New York Times. March 24, 2020. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  38. ^ "Cuomo previews the Javits Center's overhaul into a coronavirus hospital complex". March 23, 2020.
  39. ^ "NY governor says infection rate worse than feared". BBC News. March 24, 2020. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  40. ^ 211 NYPD officers, civilian members test positive for coronavirus; 7.6 percent of workforce out sick By Michael Ruiz, Fox News, 24 Mar 2020
  41. ^ Dakin Andone (March 26, 2020). "New York will allow two patients to share a single ventilator". CNN.
  42. ^ "100 Deaths From Coronavirus in N.Y. in One Day: Live Updates". The New York Times. March 26, 2020.
  43. ^ "City Hall didn't secure 1st order of COVID-19 supplies for NYC until March 6". March 20, 2020. Archived from the original on March 21, 2020. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  44. ^ "NYC first responders resent lack of coronavirus equipment". March 21, 2020. Archived from the original on March 22, 2020. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  45. ^ "Police union files complaint with state over alleged NYPD failure to issue personal protective gear to cops during coronavirus outbreak". March 13, 2020. Archived from the original on March 22, 2020. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  46. ^ Michael Rothfeld; et al. (March 25, 2020). "13 Deaths in a Day: An 'Apocalyptic' Coronavirus Surge at an N.Y.C. Hospital". The New York Times.
  47. ^ "Inside a NYC hospital in an 'apocalyptic' situation". MSNBC. March 25, 2020.
  48. ^ Reuven Fenton and Tamar Lapin (March 25, 2020). "NYC's Elmhurst Hospital at coronavirus breaking point as 13 patients die in 24-hour span". New York Post.
  49. ^ Russell, David (March 26, 2020). "Elmhurst Hospital sees 13 deaths in 24-hour span". Queens Chronicle. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  50. ^ Watkins, Ali (March 28, 2020). "N.Y.C.'s 911 System Is Overwhelmed. 'I'm Terrified,' a Paramedic Says". The New York Times. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  51. ^ Dibble, Madison (March 25, 2020). "De Blasio haunted by weeks-old tweet urging people to 'get out on the town despite coronavirus'". Washington Examiner.
  52. ^ Lawson, Kyle (March 3, 2020). "Coronavirus risk 'remains low' in NYC; same-day testing now available, officials say". SILive.com. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
  53. ^ "Gov. Andrew Cuomo: 6 New Yorkers Test Positive For Coronavirus". CBS News. March 4, 2020 – via YouTube.
  54. ^ Cornell Braces for Virus as Upstate N.Y. Reports First Case of COVID-19, West Coast Colleges Close Classrooms Archived March 9, 2020, at the Wayback Machine The Cornell Daily Sun
  55. ^ a b c Coronavirus Update: Cuomo Calls For Private Testing To Match Demand, Wife Of New Rochelle Victim Speaks, Schools Close Archived March 9, 2020, at the Wayback Machine CBS 2/WLNY TV 10/55
  56. ^ Edwards, Jessy (March 9, 2020). "NY Gov. Reveals State Hand Sanitizer Amid Price Gouging Fears". NBC New York. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  57. ^ List of schools closing in NY, NJ amid spread of COVID-19 Archived March 9, 2020, at the Wayback Machine PIX 11
  58. ^ "During Novel Coronavirus Briefing, Governor Cuomo Announces New Mass Gatherings Regulations". NY.gov. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  59. ^ Gartenberg, Chaim (March 12, 2020). "NYC just shut down Broadway for at least a month". The Verge. Archived from the original on March 12, 2020. Retrieved March 12, 2020.
  60. ^ McKenna, Chris (March 13, 2020). "Schools closed in Orange, Ulster counties for 2 weeks due to coronavirus". Times-Herald Record. Middletown, New York. Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  61. ^ "Individual tests positive for coronavirus in Herkimer County". Times Telegram. Herkimer, NY. Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  62. ^ Amy Neff Roth (March 13, 2020). "Public schools closed in Oneida, Herkimer counties". Utica Observer-Dispatch. Utica, New York. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  63. ^ "Coronavirus outbreak: NYC teachers 'furious' over de Blasio's policy to keep schools open". NBCnews.com. March 13, 2020.
  64. ^ "News and Notifications". New York State Department of Civil Service. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  65. ^ Booker, Christopher (March 14, 2020). "New York launches drive-thru testing site for COVID-19". PBS. New York, NY. Archived from the original on March 15, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  66. ^ Shapiro, Eliza (March 15, 2020). "Coronavirus in N.Y.: New York City Public Schools to Close". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 15, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  67. ^ Berger, Paul; Honan, Katie; Hawkins, Lee (March 15, 2020). "New York City Schools to Close Over Coronavirus". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Archived from the original on March 15, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  68. ^ "Governor Cuomo Announces All New York City, Westchester, Suffolk and Nassau Public Schools Will Close This Week to Limit Spread of COVID-19". Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. March 15, 2020. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  69. ^ "New York City to Close Schools, Restaurants and Bars: Live Updates". The New York Times. March 16, 2020. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  70. ^ "March 16, 2020 - Seven Bay Area Jurisdictions Order Residents to Stay Home". www.smcgov.org.
  71. ^ a b "De Blasio: New Yorkers Should Prepare for Possible Shelter-in-Place Order in Next 48 Hours". Spectrum News NY1. March 17, 2020. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  72. ^ a b Lahut, Jake. "New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio again calls for 'shelter in place,' even though he can't make the order". Business Insider.
  73. ^ Duster, Chandelis; LeBlanc, Paul. "New York governor dismisses possibility of shelter in place order after mayor urged New Yorkers to prepare for it". CNN.
  74. ^ Feuer, William (March 18, 2020). "Gov. Cuomo says he won't approve coronavirus 'shelter-in-place' order for New York City after mayor tells residents to prepare". CNBC.
  75. ^ "Coronavirus Cases in N.Y.C. Near 2,000 as Testing Expands". The New York Times. March 18, 2020. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  76. ^ "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)". NYC Health. March 18, 2020. Archived from the original on March 5, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020..
  77. ^ "Hospital Ships, Other DOD Assets Prepare for Coronavirus Response". U.S. Department of Defense. March 18, 2020. Archived from the original on March 20, 2020. Retrieved March 21, 2020.
  78. ^ "New York, Illinois Governors Issue Stay At Home Orders, Following California's Lead". NPR. March 20, 2020. Archived from the original on March 22, 2020. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  79. ^ "President Donald J. Trump Approves New York Disaster Declaration". The White House. Archived from the original on March 21, 2020. Retrieved March 21, 2020.
  80. ^ "Remarks by President Trump, Vice President Pence, and Members of the Coronavirus Task Force in Press Briefing". The White House. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  81. ^ "How blood from coronavirus survivors might save lives". Nature. March 24, 2020.
  82. ^ O'Reilly, Andrew (March 24, 2020). "White House coronavirus taskforce advises people who've left NYC to quarantine for 14 days". Fox News. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  83. ^ "Remembering CBS News journalist Maria Mercader". Retrieved March 31, 2020 – via www.cbsnews.com.
  84. ^ Yasharoff, Hannah. "CBS mourns longtime journalist Maria Mercader, who died at 54 from coronavirus". USA Today. Retrieved March 31, 2020.
  85. ^ O'Reilly, Andrew (March 26, 2020). "Trump says USNS Comfort, world's biggest hospital ship, will embark to NYC to treat coronavirus". Fox News. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  86. ^ Sommerfeldt, Clayton Guse, Chris. "USNS Comfort to arrive in NYC on Monday to relieve hospitals overrun with coronavirus patients". nydailynews.com. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  87. ^ "Tracking Covid-19 cases in the US". CNN. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
  88. ^ "No. 202.11: Continuing Temporary Suspension and Modification of Laws Relating to the Disaster Emergency". Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. March 27, 2020. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  89. ^ Saul, Stephanie (March 28, 2020). "Cuomo Postpones New York's Primary Election to June 23 Because of Coronavirus". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
  90. ^ "Cuomo rips idea of banning New Yorkers from traveling to other states". USA Today. March 28, 2020.
  91. ^ "Cuomo threatens to sue RI over new policy to find New Yorkers in the state". The Hill. March 28, 2020.
  92. ^ "RI reports 3rd COVID-19 death; 55 new cases Sunday". WPRI.com. March 29, 2020. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  93. ^ Axelrod, Daniel (March 31, 2020). "Legoland delays opening of Goshen theme park until 2021". Times Herald-Record. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  94. ^ a b Myers, Meghann (March 27, 2020). "The Army Corps of Engineers has two or three weeks to get thousands of new hospital beds up and running". Military Times. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  95. ^ "USNS Comfort Arrives in NYC Monday to Help Hospitals With Non-Coronavirus Patients". Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  96. ^ Tsioulcas, Anastasia (March 30, 2020). "Central Park And Home Of Tennis' U.S. Open To House Hospital Beds For New York". NPR. Retrieved March 31, 2020.
  97. ^ "NYC sees 1st child virus death; Chris Cuomo tests positive". Associated Press. March 31, 2020. Retrieved March 31, 2020.
  98. ^ Stelter, Brian (March 31, 2020). "CNN anchor Chris Cuomo diagnosed with coronavirus; he will continue working from home". CNN Business. Retrieved March 31, 2020.
  99. ^ Randall, Mike (March 31, 2020). "No fanfare for Trout Town's fishing opener". Times Herald Record. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  100. ^ a b "Albany and Rensselaer Counties declaring states of emergency". NEWS10 ABC. March 14, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  101. ^ "Early Intervention, Preschool halt services in Allegany County". The Evening Tribune. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  102. ^ a b c d e "De Blasio Declares State of Emergency in N.Y.C., and Large Gatherings Are Banned". The New York Times. March 12, 2020. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 14, 2020. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  103. ^ Biviano, Ashley. "Coronavirus in NY: Broome County declares state of emergency, closes schools". Pressconnects. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  104. ^ a b c "State of Emergency issued in various WNY counties". News 4 Buffalo. March 15, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  105. ^ "Cayuga County declares State of Emergency, closes schools because of coronavirus". syracuse. March 14, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  106. ^ Tichy, Eric. "County Declares State of Emergency, Schools To Close". www.post-journal.com. Archived from the original on March 21, 2020. Retrieved March 21, 2020.
  107. ^ a b Biviano, Ashley. "Coronavirus in NY: Chemung, Schuyler, Steuben declare emergencies, close some schools". Elmira Star-Gazette. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  108. ^ Einsidler, Nina (March 15, 2020). "Chenango County declares state of emergency, closes schools". WBNG. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  109. ^ Russell, Emily; Plattsburgh, in; NY. "Clinton County, Town and City of Plattsburgh declare states of emergency". NCPR. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  110. ^ a b "Saratoga and Columbia Counties now under states of emergency". NEWS10 ABC. March 16, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  111. ^ Einsidler, Nina (March 15, 2020). "Cortland County declares state of emergency, closes schools". WBNG. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  112. ^ Gorman, Julia (March 15, 2020). "Delaware County declares state of emergency, closes schools". WBNG. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  113. ^ Government, Dutchess County. "Dutchess County Announces State of Emergency". Dutchess County Government. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  114. ^ Ferguson |, Jonathan. "Essex County Declares State of Emergency Due to Novel Coronavirus – March 10th, 2020. – Essex County, New York". Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  115. ^ "Franklin County declares state of emergency because of coronavirus, no cases in the county". The Malone Telegram. Archived from the original on March 20, 2020. Retrieved March 21, 2020.
  116. ^ "Schools Out: Genesee, Wyoming County declare State of Emergency, officials recommend all districts close". The Daily News. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  117. ^ "Herkimer County declares State of Emergency". WKTV News. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  118. ^ ABBASSjabbass@wdt.net, JULIE. "Lewis County declares a state of emergency". NNY360. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  119. ^ "Livingston County Declares State of Emergency". geneseesun.com. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  120. ^ Twitter, The Dispatch Staff newsroom@oneidadispatch com @OneidaDispatch on. "Madison County declares State of Emergency". Oneida Dispatch. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  121. ^ WHAM (March 13, 2020). "Second coronavirus case prompts state of emergency". WHAM. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  122. ^ "County Executive Declares State of Emergency". Montgomery County. March 15, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  123. ^ Says, Louslocks (March 13, 2020). "Coronavirus Update: Nassau County Declares State Of Emergency As Cases On Long Island Continue To Grow". Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  124. ^ "Coronavirus: Oneida County declares state of emergency, closes all public schools". Uticaod. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  125. ^ Pietzold, Joshua (March 14, 2020). "Onondaga County to close all public schools, declares state of emergency". WSTM. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  126. ^ Media, Messenger Post. "Ontario County issues state of emergency for COVID-19". MPNnow. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  127. ^ "Orleans County declares State of Emergency, schools will close". WHEC News10NBC. March 14, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  128. ^ Pietzold, Joshua (March 15, 2020). "Oswego County to close K-12 schools, declares state of emergency". WSTM. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  129. ^ "Otsego County declares State of Emergency". WKTV News. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  130. ^ Austin, Brian K. (March 13, 2020). "Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell declares State of Emergency and issues an Emergency Order to close all schools in the County to help prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus". Putnam County Online. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  131. ^ "County of Rockland, New York :: County Executive Day Declares State of Emergency". rocklandgov.com. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  132. ^ "State of emergency declared in Schenectady County". WNYT NewsChannel 13. March 15, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  133. ^ "Schoharie County declares state of emergency for virus". The Daily Star. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  134. ^ "Seneca County declares State of Emergency". RochesterFirst. March 15, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  135. ^ "Steuben County declares State of Emergency in response to COVID-19". WETM - MyTwinTiers.com. March 14, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  136. ^ "St. Lawrence County declares state of emergency, as COVID-19 concerns rise | NorthCountryNow". northcountrynow.com. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  137. ^ Civiletti, Denise (March 12, 2020). "Coronavirus cases in Suffolk County double to 16, 10 hospitalized; state of emergency declared". RiverheadLOCAL. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  138. ^ "Sullivan County Declares State of Emergency | Sullivan County NY". sullivanny.us. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  139. ^ "All Tioga County schools closing in a State of Emergency". WETM - MyTwinTiers.com. March 14, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  140. ^ "Breaking: Tompkins County to close all public schools". WETM - MyTwinTiers.com. March 14, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  141. ^ "Two more cases of COVID-19 in Ulster; Ryan declares State of Emergency". Hudson Valley One. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  142. ^ Gorbman, Randy. "Wayne County declares state of emergency; schools to close". www.wxxinews.org. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  143. ^ "County Executive George Latimer Declares 'State Of Emergency' In Response To COVID-19 Pandemic". www.westchestergov.com. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  144. ^ "Wyoming County declares State of Emergency due to COVID-19". WKBW. March 15, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  145. ^ "Yates County, NY". Yates County, NY. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  146. ^ Slattery, Dennis (March 27, 2020). "Fourth N.Y. Assemblymember tests positive for coronavirus". New York Daily News. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  147. ^ "Assemblyman Brian Miller in ICU After Coronavirus Diagnosis". WKTV. Utica, New York. March 27, 2020. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  148. ^ "New York state Sen. Jim Seward and wife test positive for COVID-19". The Post-Standard. Syracuse, New York. March 30, 2020. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  149. ^ "NYC nurses fear many coronavirus patients can't afford to self-quarantine". Daily News. March 24, 2020.
  150. ^ Ziri, Danielle (March 25, 2020). "In America's Only Orthodox Town, Coronavirus Poses Unique Challenge for Insular Jewish Community". Haaretz. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  151. ^ "COVID-19/Coronavirus". Orange County Department of Health. March 27, 2020. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  152. ^ a b Feldman, Ari (March 24, 2020). "This doctor was already treating patients with Trump's 'gift from God' drug - before FDA approval". The Forward. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  153. ^ "Coronavirus Hits Governor Cuomo's Family: Live Updates". The New York Times. March 31, 2020. Retrieved March 31, 2020.
  154. ^ "Coronavirus News: NYPD has 5,600 officers out sick, 5 deaths". ABC7 New York. March 31, 2020. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  155. ^ Feinsand, Mark (March 16, 2020). "Opening of regular season to be pushed back". MLB.com. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  156. ^ "Silver: NBA hiatus likely to last 'at least' 30 days". ESPN.com. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  157. ^ NHL statement on coronavirus Archived March 14, 2020, at the Wayback Machine NHL, March 12, 2020
  158. ^ MLS postponed for 30 days; USMNT, USWNT friendlies canceled Archived March 15, 2020, at the Wayback Machine ESPN, March 12, 2020
  159. ^ "NLL Statement on Game Play (March 12, 2020) | National Lacrosse League". Archived from the original on March 22, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  160. ^ "Coronavirus live updates: NBA suspends season after Utah Jazz player tests positive for COVID-19". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on March 12, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2020.
  161. ^ NCAA cancels remaining winter and spring championships Archived March 12, 2020, at the Wayback Machine NCAA, March 12, 2020
  162. ^ NJCAA cancels spring sports, basketball nationals amid coronavirus outbreak Archived March 18, 2020, at the Wayback Machine MLive.com, March 16, 2020
  163. ^ Medina, Jeff Zillgitt and Mark. "Kevin Durant among four Brooklyn Nets who test positive for COVID-19". USA Today. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  164. ^ Weidner, Nolan (March 12, 2020). "State suspends all high school winter sports playoffs". The Post-Standard. Syracuse, New York. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
  165. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases". Department of Health. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  166. ^ "COVID-19 in US and Canada". 1Point3Acres. Archived from the original on March 14, 2020. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  167. ^ "Broome County COVID-19 Dashboard". broomecounty.maps.arcgis.com. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  168. ^ "Cattaraugus County COVID-19 Case Tracker". maps2.cattco.org. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  169. ^ Harding, Robert (March 28, 2020). "New confirmed case of coronavirus in Cayuga County, two released from isolation". Auburn Citizen.
  170. ^ "COVID-19 Chautauqua County, New York". chautauquacounty.maps.arcgis.com. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  171. ^ "COVID-19 Erie County, New York". erieny.maps.arcgis.com. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  172. ^ "Operations Dashboard for ArcGIS". livingstoncounty.maps.arcgis.com. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  173. ^ "Niagara County COVID-19 Positive Results Map". Niagara County Department of Health. April 1, 2020.
  174. ^ "Rensselaer County". www.facebook.com. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  175. ^ Cutler, Nancy; Brum, Robert (March 30, 2020). "Coronavirus: Rockland deaths more than double to 18". The Journal News. Retrieved March 30, 2020 – via Times Herald Record.
  176. ^ Wang, Helu (March 30, 2020). "Sullivan County reports first COVID-19 related death". Times-Herald Record. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  177. ^ "Yates County confirms first COVID-19 case". WHEC-TV. March 29, 2020. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  178. ^ "Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 8, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  179. ^ "Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 9, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  180. ^ "Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 10, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  181. ^ "Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 11, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  182. ^ "Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 12, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  183. ^ "Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  184. ^ "Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 14, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  185. ^ "Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 15, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  186. ^ "Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  187. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  188. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  189. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 20, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  190. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 21, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  191. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 23, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  192. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  193. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 26, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  194. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 27, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  195. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 28, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  196. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 28, 2020. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
  197. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 29, 2020. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  198. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on March 30, 2020. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  199. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on April 1, 2020. Retrieved March 31, 2020.
  200. ^ "County by County Breakdown of Positive Cases (Archived copy)". Archived from the original on April 1, 2020. Retrieved April 1, 2020.

External linksEdit