2019 World Open (snooker)

The 2019 World Open (also known as the 2019 Yushan World Open) was a professional snooker tournament that took place between 28 October and 3 November 2019 at the Yushan Sport Centre in Yushan, China. The event was the 2019 edition of the World Open, which was first held in 1982. It was the fifth ranking event and the third event held in China of the 2019/20 season. It featured a prize fund of £772,000 with the winner receiving £150,000.

2019 Yushan World Open
Tournament information
Dates28 October – 3 November 2019
VenueYushan Sport Centre
CityYushan
CountryChina
Organisation(s)WPBSA
FormatRanking event
Total prize fund£772,000
Winner's share£150,000
Highest break Judd Trump (ENG) (144)
Final
Champion Judd Trump (ENG)
Runner-up Thepchaiya Un-Nooh (THA)
Score10–5
2018
2020

Mark Williams was the defending champion, having won the 2018 event, defeating David Gilbert 10–9 in the final. Williams did not enter this year's event. After Judd Trump defeated John Higgins and Thepchaiya Un-Nooh defeated Kyren Wilson by the same 6–5 score in the semi-finals, they met in the final. Trump won the event, and his 13th ranking event title, defeating Un-Nooh 10–5. Trump also compiled the highest break of the event, scoring a 144 in the third frame of his first round victory over Sam Craigie.

Tournament formatEdit

The 2019 World Open was a professional snooker tournament held at the Yushan Sport Centre in Yushan, China between 28 October and 3 November 2019.[1][2] This was the 2019 edition of the World Open tournament, the first having been held in 1982 as the 1982 Professional Players Tournament.[3] It was the fifth ranking event of the 2019/20 snooker season following the English Open and preceding the Northern Ireland Open.[4][5] It was played as the best-of-9-frames until the semi-finals, which were best-of-11-frames, followed by a best-of-19-frames final.[6] The event featured 64 participants from the World Snooker Tour with a single qualifying round.[6] The World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association and World Snooker organised the World Open.[1]

Prize fundEdit

A total of £772,000 was awarded as prize money for the event, with the winner receiving £150,000.[1][7] This was £37,000 more than the prior year's event. This meant an increase in the prize money for the last 64 losers from £4,000 to £5,000 and a rise for the last 16 from £13,000 to £13,500.[8] The breakdown of prize money for this year was:[7]

  • Winner: £150,000
  • Runner-up: £75,000
  • Semi-final: £32,500
  • Quarter-final: £20,000
  • Last 16: £13,500
  • Last 32: £8,000
  • Last 64: £5,000
  • Total: £772,000

Tournament summaryEdit

The 2019 World Open was held from 28 October until 3 November 2019 at the Yushan Sport Centre in Yushan, China.[1] The defending champion, Mark Williams, declined to appear at the tournament.[9] Qualifying for the event was held at the Barnsley Metrodome in Barnsley, South Yorkshire, from 3–5 October 2019 and in Yushan on 28 October.[10] Neil Robertson failed to show up for his qualifying match, as he accidentally drove to Barnsley, Gloucestershire.[10][11][12] World Snooker later made fun of him for mistaking the location of the qualifiers by sending him a map to the site of the next event—the Northern Ireland Open.[13] With Robertson being forced to withdraw, Ian Burns was awarded a bye.[14]

The world number two Ronnie O'Sullivan failed to progress through qualifying. He played Welsh player Dominic Dale, who had failed to defeat O'Sullivan after ten attempts, and lost 3–5. Dale commented the win had "only taken 27 years".[15] The rest of the top-16 players successfully qualified for the event, with John Higgins defeating Chen Zifan and Stephen Maguire defeating Oliver Lines.[16] Another qualifying upset was Elliot Slessor recovering from 2–4 behind to defeat two-time ranking event winner Ryan Day 5–4.[16]

Early rounds (round one—quarter-finals)Edit

Having won the previous event at the English Open, Mark Selby won both of his first two matches over Anthony Hamilton and Noppon Saengkham. He met 2015 World Snooker Championship winner Stuart Bingham in the last 16, where he lost 2–5. Selby won both of the opening two frames, before Bingham won the next five frames with breaks of 108, 97, 114, 104 and 117.[17] Bingham met four-time World Champion John Higgins in the quarter-finals, losing 2–5.[6][18]

The runner-up at the English Open, David Gilbert defeated Zhao Xintong 5–4, before a whitewash of Anthony McGill 5–0 and a 5–3 win over Mark Allen.[6] Gilbert met Thailand's Thepchaiya Un-Nooh in the quarter-finals.[19] Un-Nooh, ranked 37th in the world, led 2–1 before breaks of 100, 55 and 62 from Gilbert saw him go behind 2–4. Un-Nooh won the next three frames with breaks of 77, 66 and 96 in just 37 minutes to reach the semi-finals.[18][20][21]

Reigning World Champion Judd Trump was tied at 4–4 with Sam Craigie in his first round match despite leading at 3–0 but won the deciding frame. He then defeated Liang Wenbo 5–3 before another deciding frame win over Joe Perry. His quarter-final match was against Michael Holt.[6] Had he won the event, he was the last remaining player who could qualify for the Champion of Champions event ahead of Jimmy White.[22] Trump however, won the match 5–1, having lead at 4–0.[18] The fourth and final semi-finalist was two-time ranking winner Kyren Wilson, who defeated, Robbie Williams 5–2, Hossein Vafaei 5–4, Jack Lisowski 5–1, and Zhou Yuelong 5–3.[6][18]

Later rounds (semi-final—final)Edit

The two semi-finals were held on 2 November 2019. Both matches were played as best-of-11 frames; both finished at 6–5.[23][9] The first semi-final was played between Wilson and Un-Nooh. Wilson won the opening three frames of the match; who's highest break during this time was a 44.[20] Un-Nooh won frame four, before Wilson won the next frame to lead 4–1. Un-Nooh won the next two frames, including a break of 74, but Wilson won frame eight to lead 5–3.[20] Un-Nooh won the next two frames to force a deciding frame. Wilson made the first break of the final frame but made only 38 before Un-Nooh made a break of 61. The match was decided after Wilson missed a yellow ball, allowing Un-Nooh to win frame and the match.[20]

The second semi-final was a rematch of the 2019 World Snooker Championship final between Trump and Higgins. Trump took the opening frame. Higgins took the next two with two breaks of more than 50.[23] Trump won the next four frames, including a break of 99.[23] With neither opponent playing well, Higgins won the next three frames which also set up a deciding frame. Trump gained the first chance of frame 11, scoring a 55, before Higgins made a break of 15. Higgins missed a pink ball into the middle pocket allowing Trump to clear the table and win the match 6–5.[23]

The final was held between Judd Trump and Thepchaiya Un-Nooh on 3 November 2019. This was Thepchaiya's second ranking event final, having won the 2019 Snooker Shoot Out.[20][24] Trump was contesting his 22nd ranking event final.[23] The match was also a rematch of the first-round match of the World Championships, where Trump defeated Un-Nooh 10–9.[20] Trump took an early lead in the match winning the first session 7–2. Frame seven was awarded to Trump, after Un-Nooh failed to hit the red ball on three occasions in-a-row.[25] Un-Nooh won the next three frames to trail at 7–2, before Trump won three straight frames to win the championship and his 13th ranking event. The victory put Trump level with Ding Junhui into eighth for the most ranking event titles won.[26]

Main drawEdit

Players shown in bold denote match winners. The draw for the main competition is shown below.[6][27][a]

 
Last 64
Best of 9 frames
Last 32
Best of 9 frames
Last 16
Best of 9 frames
Quarter-finals
Best of 9 frames
Semi-finals
Best of 11 frames
Final
Best of 19 frames
 
                      
 
 
 
 
  Judd Trump (ENG)5
 
 
 
  Sam Craigie (ENG)4
 
  Judd Trump5
 
 
 
  Liang Wenbo3
 
  Barry Pinches (ENG)0
 
 
 
  Liang Wenbo (CHN)5
 
  Judd Trump5
 
 
 
  Joe Perry4
 
  Joe Perry (ENG)5
 
 
 
  Michael Georgiou (CYP)2
 
  Joe Perry5
 
 
 
  Stuart Carrington3
 
  Yan Bingtao (CHN)1
 
 
 
  Stuart Carrington (ENG)5
 
  Judd Trump5
 
 
 
  Michael Holt1
 
  Michael Holt (ENG)5
 
 
 
  Luca Brecel (BEL)2
 
  Michael Holt5
 
 
 
  Barry Hawkins3
 
  Marco Fu (HKG)3
 
 
 
  Barry Hawkins (ENG)5
 
  Michael Holt5
 
 
 
  Ding Junhui1
 
  Martin O'Donnell (ENG)5
 
 
 
  Chang Bingyu (CHN)3
 
  Martin O'Donnell2
 
 
 
  Ding Junhui5
 
  Liam Highfield (ENG)w/d
 
 
 
  Ding Junhui (CHN)w/o
 
  Judd Trump6
 
 
 
  John Higgins5
 
  Mark Selby (ENG)5
 
 
 
  Anthony Hamilton (ENG)3
 
  Mark Selby5
 
 
 
  Noppon Saengkham2
 
  Ricky Walden (ENG)3
 
 
 
  Noppon Saengkham (THA)5
 
  Mark Selby2
 
 
 
  Stuart Bingham5
 
  Stuart Bingham (ENG)5
 
 
 
  Nigel Bond (ENG)3
 
  Stuart Bingham5
 
 
 
  Jimmy Robertson3
 
  Jimmy Robertson (ENG)5
 
 
 
  Jackson Page (WAL)0
 
  Stuart Bingham2
 
 
 
  John Higgins5
 
  Jordan Brown (NIR)2
 
 
 
  Graeme Dott (SCO)5
 
  Graeme Dott5
 
 
 
  Shaun Murphy1
 
  Alan McManus (SCO)2
 
 
 
  Shaun Murphy (ENG)5
 
  Graeme Dott4
 
 
 
  John Higgins5
 
  Mark Davis (ENG)5
 
 
 
  Matthew Selt (ENG)0
 
  Mark Davis1
 
 
 
  John Higgins5
 
  Lu Ning (CHN)4
 
 
 
  John Higgins (SCO)5
 
  Judd Trump10
 
 
 
  Thepchaiya Un-Nooh5
 
  Ian Burns (ENG)1
 
 
 
  Craig Steadman (ENG)5
 
  Craig Steadman2
 
 
 
  Thepchaiya Un-Nooh5
 
  Zhang Yang1
 
 
 
  Thepchaiya Un-Nooh (THA)5
 
  Thepchaiya Un-Nooh5
 
 
 
  Sunny Akani3
 
  Stephen Maguire (SCO)w/d
 
 
 
  Sunny Akani (THA)w/o
 
  Sunny Akani5
 
 
 
  Elliot Slessor1
 
  Elliot Slessor (ENG)5
 
 
 
  Xu Si (CHN)3
 
  Thepchaiya Un-Nooh5
 
 
 
  David Gilbert4
 
  Matthew Stevens (WAL)2
 
 
 
  Anthony McGill (SCO)5
 
  Anthony McGill0
 
 
 
  David Gilbert5
 
  Zhao Xintong (CHN)4
 
 
 
  David Gilbert (ENG)5
 
  David Gilbert5
 
 
 
  Mark Allen3
 
  Li Hang (CHN)3
 
 
 
  Zhang Anda (CHN)5
 
  Zhang Anda3
 
 
 
  Mark Allen5
 
  Ken Doherty (IRL)3
 
 
 
  Mark Allen (NIR)5
 
  Thepchaiya Un-Nooh6
 
 
 
  Kyren Wilson5
 
  Kyren Wilson (ENG)5
 
 
 
  Robbie Williams (ENG)2
 
  Kyren Wilson5
 
 
 
  Hossein Vafaei4
 
  Lyu Haotian (CHN)1
 
 
 
  Hossein Vafaei (IRN)5
 
  Kyren Wilson5
 
 
 
  Jack Lisowski1
 
  Jack Lisowski (ENG)5
 
 
 
  Luo Honghao (CHN)1
 
  Jack Lisowski5
 
 
 
  Xiao Guodong1
 
  Xiao Guodong (CHN)5
 
 
 
  Harvey Chandler (ENG)0
 
  Kyren Wilson5
 
 
 
  Zhou Yuelong3
 
  Alfie Burden (ENG)5
 
 
 
  Mei Xiwen (CHN)2
 
  Alfie Burden2
 
 
 
  Ali Carter5
 
  Igor Figueiredo (BRA)1
 
 
 
  Ali Carter (ENG)5
 
  Ali Carter2
 
 
 
  Zhou Yuelong5
 
  Zhou Yuelong (CHN)5
 
 
 
  Ben Woollaston (ENG)1
 
  Zhou Yuelong5
 
 
 
  Fergal O'Brien0
 
  Fergal O'Brien (IRL)5
 
 
  Dominic Dale (WAL)3
 

FinalEdit

Final: Best of 19 frames; Referee:   Wang Wei.
Yushan Sport Centre, Yushan, China, 3 November 2019.
Judd Trump
  England
10–5 Thepchaiya Un-Nooh
  Thailand
Afternoon: 63–16, 62–66 (Trump 58), 101–4 (96), 87–18 (78), 96–0 (90), 85–14 (85), 15–0,[b] 106–12 (68), 66–73
Evening: 65–20 (64), 53–65, 13–80 (80), 8–105 (56), 136–0 (136), 98–16 (61)
136 Highest break 80
1 Century breaks 0
9 50+ breaks 2

QualifyingEdit

Most of the qualifying matches for the event were played between 2 and 5 October 2019 at the Barnsley Metrodome in Barnsley, England. Matches involving Judd Trump, Yan Bingtao, Luca Brecel, Ding Junhui, Lu Ning, Scott Donaldson, Ken Doherty and Ronnie O'Sullivan, were held over and played in Yushan on the opening day of the tournament main stage. All qualifying matches were best-of-9-frames.[28][a]

Century breaksEdit

Main stage centuriesEdit

A total of 64 century breaks were made by 25 players during the main event.[29]

Qualifying stage centuriesEdit

A total of 32 century breaks were made by 32 players during the qualifying stage for the event.[30]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b Player's displayed as "w/o" refers to a walkover win, whilst "w/d" refers to a withdrawn player.[6]
  2. ^ Un-Nooh conceeded the frame due to the three-miss rule.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "World Open". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 31 October 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  2. ^ "World Open Snooker 2019: Draw, schedule, results and TV coverage". Sporting Life. UK. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  3. ^ "Professional Players Championship". Snooker Scene. Archived from the original on 24 January 2013. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  4. ^ "Full Calendar". World Snooker. 1 November 2019. Archived from the original on 29 June 2015. Retrieved 5 October 2019.
  5. ^ "Calendar for the 2019/20 season" (PDF). World Snooker. Archived (PDF) from the original on 27 May 2019. Retrieved 21 May 2019.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i Årdalen, Hermund. "Results (World Open 2019) - snooker.org". snooker.org (in Norwegian). Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  7. ^ a b "Ranking Points Schedule" (PDF). worldsnooker.com. Retrieved 5 October 2019.
  8. ^ "2018/19 Snooker season prize money" (PDF). worldsnooker.com. Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 July 2018. Retrieved 17 December 2019.
  9. ^ a b Årdalen, Hermund. "Yushan World Open (2019) - snooker.org". snooker.org (in Norwegian). Retrieved 5 October 2019.
  10. ^ a b Caulfield, David (5 October 2019). "World Open: Neil Robertson drives to wrong Barnsley and forfeits qualifier". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 5 October 2019. Retrieved 5 October 2019.
  11. ^ "Robertson Goes To Wrong Barnsley For Yushan Qualifiers". World Snooker. 5 October 2019. Archived from the original on 5 October 2019. Retrieved 5 October 2019.
  12. ^ Media, P. A. (5 October 2019). "Neil Robertson forfeits snooker qualifier after driving to wrong Barnsley". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 6 October 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  13. ^ Caulfield, David (8 October 2019). "World Snooker Pokes Fun at Neil Robertson – SnookerHQ". SnookerHQ. Archived from the original on 17 December 2019. Retrieved 17 December 2019.
  14. ^ Mercer, Jessica (5 October 2019). "Snooker's Neil Robertson gets Barnsleys confused in Sat-Nav error". gloucestershirelive. Archived from the original on 25 October 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  15. ^ "Ronnie O'Sullivan suffers first defeat against Dominic Dale". BBC Sport. 28 October 2019. Archived from the original on 30 October 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  16. ^ a b "Neil Robertson Drives to Wrong Barnsley". SnookerHQ. 5 October 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019. Elliot Slessor
  17. ^ Hincks, Michael (31 October 2019). "World Open 2019 news – Stunning Stuart Bingham run sends Mark Selby packing". Eurosport UK. Archived from the original on 31 October 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  18. ^ a b c d Mann, Richard (1 November 2019). "World Open snooker day five review: Judd Trump beats Michael Holt; John Higgins and Kyren Wilson claim big wins". Sporting Life. UK. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  19. ^ "In pics: quarterfinals at 2019 Snooker World Open – Xinhua | English.news.cn". Xinhua News Agency. 1 November 2019. Archived from the original on 3 November 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  20. ^ a b c d e f "Un-Nooh Fight Back Floors Wilson". World Snooker. 2 November 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  21. ^ "Un-Nooh And Wilson into Semis". World Snooker. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  22. ^ "Jimmy White to Play Ronnie O'Sullivan in 2019 Champion of Champions". SnookerHQ. Archived from the original on 3 November 2019. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  23. ^ a b c d e "Trump Survives Higgins Charge To Reach Final". World Snooker. 2 November 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  24. ^ "Speed King Un-Nooh Lands Shoot Out Title". World Snooker. 24 February 2019. Archived from the original on 25 February 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  25. ^ "World Open Success for Judd Trump". SnookerHQ. 3 November 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  26. ^ "Judd Trump beats Thepchaiya Un-Nooh in World Open final". BBC Sport. 3 November 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  27. ^ "Official draw" (PDF). World Snooker. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  28. ^ "Matches | World Snooker Live Scores". livescores.worldsnookerdata.com. Archived from the original on 23 August 2019. Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  29. ^ "Centuries | World Snooker Live Scores". livescores.worldsnookerdata.com. Archived from the original on 28 October 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  30. ^ "Centuries | World Snooker Live Scores". livescores.worldsnookerdata.com. Archived from the original on 2 October 2019. Retrieved 2 October 2019.