2014 Critérium du Dauphiné

The 2014 Critérium du Dauphiné was the sixty-sixth running of the Critérium du Dauphiné cycling stage race; a race, organised by the Amaury Sport Organisation, rated as a World Tour event on the UCI calendar, the highest classification such an event can have. The race consisted of eight stages, covering a distance of 1,187.4 km (737.8 mi),[1] beginning on 8 June in Lyon and concluding in Courchevel on 15 June. The Dauphiné was viewed as a great preparation for July's Tour de France and a number of the contenders for the general classification of the Tour participated in the Dauphiné.[2]

2014 Critérium du Dauphiné
2014 UCI World Tour, race 16 of 29
Race details
Dates8–15 June 2014
Stages8
Distance1,187.4 km (737.8 mi)
Winning time31h 08' 08"
Results
Winner  Andrew Talansky (USA) (Garmin–Sharp)
  Second  Alberto Contador (ESP) (Tinkoff–Saxo)
  Third  Jurgen Van den Broeck (BEL) (Lotto–Belisol)

Points  Chris Froome (GBR) (Team Sky)
Mountains  Alessandro De Marchi (ITA) (Cannondale)
Youth  Wilco Kelderman (NED) (Belkin Pro Cycling)
  Team Astana
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2015 →

TeamsEdit

As the Critérium du Dauphiné is a UCI World Tour event, all eighteen UCI ProTeams are invited automatically and obligated to send a squad with three other squads given wildcard places.[3][4]

RouteEdit

Stage characteristics and winners[5][6]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
1 8 June Lyon to Lyon 10.4 km (6.5 mi)   Individual time trial   Chris Froome (GBR)
2 9 June Tarare to Pays d'Olliergues-Col du Béal 156 km (96.9 mi)   Mountain stage   Chris Froome (GBR)
3 10 June Ambert to Le Teil 194 km (120.5 mi)   Flat stage   Nikias Arndt (GER)
4 11 June Montélimar to Gap 167.5 km (104.1 mi)   Medium-mountain stage   Yuri Trofimov (RUS)
5 12 June Sisteron to La Mure 189.5 km (117.7 mi)   Medium-mountain stage   Simon Špilak (SLO)
6 13 June Grenoble to Poisy 178.5 km (110.9 mi)   Flat stage   Jan Bakelants (BEL)
7 14 June Ville-la-Grand to Finhaut-Emosson (Switzerland) 160 km (99.4 mi)   Mountain stage   Lieuwe Westra (NED)
8 15 June Megève to Courchevel-Le Praz 131.5 km (81.7 mi)   Medium-mountain stage   Mikel Nieve (ESP)

StagesEdit

Stage 1Edit

8 June 2014 — Lyon to Lyon, 10.4 km (6.5 mi), individual time trial (ITT)

The Critérium du Dauphiné began with a 10.4 km (6.5 mi) time trial on the streets of Lyon. Intermediate times were taken at 4.6 km (2.9 mi), at the top of the only hill, to decide the rankings in the mountains competition. Chris Froome, the defending champion, won the stage by eight seconds over his arch-rival and fellow GC contender, Alberto Contador. Contador managed to knock Bob Jungels off the hot seat when he beat Jungels' time by one second after Jungels was on the hot seat for a long time. Another main GC contender, Vincenzo Nibali, took the fastest time at the top of the hill to take the lead in the mountains classification. However, he was not able to beat Contador at the finish as he eventually finished eighth on the stage, five seconds behind Contador's time. However, the best performance was left to Froome. Finishing second at the intermediate time-check, Froome eventually beat Contador's time by eight seconds to take the yellow-and-blue jersey for the general classification and the green jersey for the points classification after the first stage.

Stage 1 Result and General Classification after Stage 1[7][8][9]
Rider Team Time
1   Chris Froome (GBR)    Team Sky 13' 13"
2   Alberto Contador (ESP) Tinkoff–Saxo + 8"
3   Bob Jungels (LUX)   Trek Factory Racing + 9"
4   Andrew Talansky (USA) Garmin–Sharp + 11"
5   Wilco Kelderman (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 11"
6   Lars Boom (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 12"
7   Vasil Kiryienka (BLR) Team Sky + 12"
8   Vincenzo Nibali (ITA)   Astana + 13"
9   Tejay van Garderen (USA) BMC Racing Team + 13"
10   Matthias Brändle (AUT) IAM Cycling + 13"

Stage 2Edit

9 June 2014 — Tarare to Pays d'Olliergues-Col du Béal, 156 km (96.9 mi)
Stage 2 Result[10][11][12]
Rider Team Time
1   Chris Froome (GBR)   Team Sky 4h 24' 41"
2   Alberto Contador (ESP) Tinkoff–Saxo s.t.
3   Wilco Kelderman (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 4"
4   Jurgen Van den Broeck (BEL) Lotto–Belisol + 10"
5   Andrew Talansky (USA) Garmin–Sharp + 12"
6   Vincenzo Nibali (ITA)   Astana + 27"
7   Igor Antón (ESP) Movistar Team + 40"
8   Adam Yates (GBR) Orica–GreenEDGE + 42"
9   Sébastien Reichenbach (SUI) IAM Cycling + 44"
10   Daniel Navarro (ESP) Cofidis + 45"
General Classification after Stage 2[10][11][12]
Rider Team Time
1   Chris Froome (GBR)    Team Sky 4h 37' 44"
2   Alberto Contador (ESP) Tinkoff–Saxo + 12"
3   Wilco Kelderman (NED)   Belkin Pro Cycling + 21"
4   Andrew Talansky (USA) Garmin–Sharp + 33"
5   Jurgen Van den Broeck (BEL) Lotto–Belisol + 35"
6   Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) Astana + 50"
7   Haimar Zubeldia (ESP) Trek Factory Racing + 1' 22"
8   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 1' 22"
9   Adam Yates (GBR) Orica–GreenEDGE + 1' 31"
10   Tanel Kangert (EST) Astana + 1' 35"

Stage 3Edit

10 June 2014 — Ambert to Le Teil, 194 km (120.5 mi)
Stage 3 Result[13][14][15]
Rider Team Time
1   Nikias Arndt (GER) Giant–Shimano 5h 30' 03"
2   Kris Boeckmans (BEL) Lotto–Belisol s.t.
3   Reinardt Janse van Rensburg (RSA) Giant–Shimano s.t.
4   Yannick Martinez (FRA) Team Europcar s.t.
5   Davide Cimolai (ITA) Lampre–Merida s.t.
6   Jens Keukeleire (BEL) Orica–GreenEDGE s.t.
7   Alexey Tsatevich (RUS) Team Katusha s.t.
8   Arnaud Démare (FRA) FDJ.fr s.t.
9   Gianni Meersman (BEL) Omega Pharma–Quick-Step s.t.
10   Marco Marcato (ITA) Cannondale s.t.
General Classification after Stage 3[13][14][15]
Rider Team Time
1   Chris Froome (GBR)    Team Sky 10h 07' 47"
2   Alberto Contador (ESP) Tinkoff–Saxo + 12"
3   Wilco Kelderman (NED)   Belkin Pro Cycling + 21"
4   Andrew Talansky (USA) Garmin–Sharp + 33"
5   Jurgen Van den Broeck (BEL) Lotto–Belisol + 35"
6   Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) Astana + 50"
7   Haimar Zubeldia (ESP) Trek Factory Racing + 1' 22"
8   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 1' 22"
9   Adam Yates (GBR) Orica–GreenEDGE + 1' 31"
10   Tanel Kangert (EST) Astana + 1' 35"

Stage 4Edit

11 June 2014 — Montélimar to Gap, 167.5 km (104.1 mi)
Stage 4 Result[16][17][18]
Rider Team Time
1   Yuri Trofimov (RUS) Team Katusha 3h 59' 22"
2   Gustav Larsson (SWE) IAM Cycling + 23"
3   Pim Ligthart (NED) Lotto–Belisol + 25"
4   Lars Petter Nordhaug (NOR) Belkin Pro Cycling + 28"
5   Peter Velits (SVK) BMC Racing Team + 28"
6   Maxime Bouet (FRA) Ag2r–La Mondiale + 28"
7   Jan Bakelants (BEL) Omega Pharma–Quick-Step + 28"
8   Damiano Caruso (ITA) Cannondale + 28"
9   Andriy Hryvko (UKR) Astana + 1' 31"
10   Ryder Hesjedal (CAN) Garmin–Sharp + 1' 31"
General Classification after Stage 4[16][17][18]
Rider Team Time
1   Chris Froome (GBR)    Team Sky 14h 09' 19"
2   Alberto Contador (ESP) Tinkoff–Saxo + 12"
3   Wilco Kelderman (NED)   Belkin Pro Cycling + 21"
4   Andrew Talansky (USA) Garmin–Sharp + 33"
5   Jurgen Van den Broeck (BEL) Lotto–Belisol + 35"
6   Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) Astana + 50"
7   Maxime Bouet (FRA) Ag2r–La Mondiale + 1' 01"
8   Haimar Zubeldia (ESP) Trek Factory Racing + 1' 22"
9   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 1' 22"
10   Adam Yates (GBR) Orica–GreenEDGE + 1' 31"

Stage 5Edit

12 June 2014 — Sisteron to La Mure, 189.5 km (117.7 mi)
Stage 5 Result[19][20][21]
Rider Team Time
1   Simon Špilak (SLO) Team Katusha 4h 51' 24"
2   Wilco Kelderman (NED)   Belkin Pro Cycling + 14"
3   Adam Yates (GBR) Orica–GreenEDGE + 14"
4   Daryl Impey (RSA) Orica–GreenEDGE + 17"
5   Romain Bardet (FRA) Ag2r–La Mondiale + 17"
6   Daniel Moreno (ESP) Team Katusha + 17"
7   Tanel Kangert (EST) Astana + 17"
8   Damiano Caruso (ITA) Cannondale + 17"
9   Arthur Vichot (FRA) FDJ.fr + 17"
10   Leopold König (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 17"
General Classification after Stage 5[19][20][21]
Rider Team Time
1   Chris Froome (GBR)    Team Sky 19h 01' 00"
2   Alberto Contador (ESP) Tinkoff–Saxo + 12"
3   Wilco Kelderman (NED)   Belkin Pro Cycling + 12"
4   Andrew Talansky (USA) Garmin–Sharp + 33"
5   Jurgen Van den Broeck (BEL) Lotto–Belisol + 35"
6   Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) Astana + 50"
7   Haimar Zubeldia (ESP) Trek Factory Racing + 1' 22"
8   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 1' 22"
9   Adam Yates (GBR) Orica–GreenEDGE + 1' 24"
10   Tanel Kangert (EST) Astana + 1' 35"

Stage 6Edit

13 June 2014 — Grenoble to Poisy, 178.5 km (110.9 mi)
Stage 6 Result[22][23][24]
Rider Team Time
1   Jan Bakelants (BEL) Omega Pharma–Quick-Step 4h 07' 20"
2   Lieuwe Westra (NED) Astana s.t.
3   Zdeněk Štybar (CZE) Omega Pharma–Quick-Step + 24"
4   Pim Ligthart (NED) Lotto–Belisol + 24"
5   Jens Keukeleire (BEL) Orica–GreenEDGE + 24"
6   Jens Voigt (GER) Trek Factory Racing + 24"
7   Maciej Bodnar (POL) Cannondale + 24"
8   Bram Tankink (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 24"
9   Valerio Conti (ITA) Lampre–Merida + 24"
10   Julien Simon (FRA) Cofidis + 24"
General Classification after Stage 6[22][23][24]
Rider Team Time
1   Chris Froome (GBR)    Team Sky 23h 12' 15"
2   Alberto Contador (ESP) Tinkoff–Saxo + 12"
3   Wilco Kelderman (NED)   Belkin Pro Cycling + 12"
4   Andrew Talansky (USA) Garmin–Sharp + 33"
5   Jurgen Van den Broeck (BEL) Lotto–Belisol + 35"
6   Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) Astana + 50"
7   Haimar Zubeldia (ESP) Trek Factory Racing + 1' 22"
8   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 1' 22"
9   Adam Yates (GBR) Orica–GreenEDGE + 1' 24"
10   Tanel Kangert (EST) Astana + 1' 35"

Stage 7Edit

14 June 2014 — Ville-la-Grand to FinhautEmosson (Switzerland), 160 km (99.4 mi)
Stage 7 Result[25][26][27]
Rider Team Time
1   Lieuwe Westra (NED) Astana 4h 32' 51"
2   Yuri Trofimov (RUS) Team Katusha + 7"
3   Egor Silin (RUS) Team Katusha + 16"
4   Alberto Contador (ESP) Tinkoff–Saxo + 1' 33"
5   Andrew Talansky (USA) Garmin–Sharp + 1' 51"
6   Ryder Hesjedal (CAN) Garmin–Sharp + 1' 53"
7   Chris Froome (GBR)   Team Sky + 1' 53"
8   Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) Astana + 2' 11"
9   Romain Bardet (FRA) Ag2r–La Mondiale + 2' 16"
10   Sébastien Reichenbach (SUI) IAM Cycling + 2' 19"
General Classification after Stage 7[25][26][27]
Rider Team Time
1   Alberto Contador (ESP)   Tinkoff–Saxo 27h 46' 51"
2   Chris Froome (GBR)   Team Sky + 8"
3   Andrew Talansky (USA) Garmin–Sharp + 39"
4   Wilco Kelderman (NED)   Belkin Pro Cycling + 59"
5   Jurgen Van den Broeck (BEL) Lotto–Belisol + 1' 14"
6   Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) Astana + 1' 16"
7   Romain Bardet (FRA) Ag2r–La Mondiale + 2' 11"
8   Sébastien Reichenbach (SUI) IAM Cycling + 2' 14"
9   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 2' 50"
10   Adam Yates (GBR) Orica–GreenEDGE + 2' 52"

Stage 8Edit

15 June 2014 — Megève to Courchevel-Le Praz, 131.5 km (81.7 mi)
Stage 8 Result[28][29]
Rider Team Time
1   Mikel Nieve (ESP) Team Sky 3h 20' 29"
2   Romain Bardet (FRA) Ag2r–La Mondiale + 3"
3   Adam Yates (GBR) Orica–GreenEDGE + 5"
4   Andrew Talansky (USA) Garmin–Sharp + 9"
5   Jurgen Van den Broeck (BEL) Lotto–Belisol + 9"
6   Tejay van Garderen (USA) BMC Racing Team + 15"
7   Wilco Kelderman (NED)   Belkin Pro Cycling + 32"
8   John Gadret (FRA) Movistar Team + 36"
9   Daniel Navarro (ESP) Cofidis + 41"
10   Alberto Contador (ESP)   Tinkoff–Saxo + 1' 15"
Final General Classification[28][29]
Rider Team Time
1   Andrew Talansky (USA)   Garmin–Sharp 31h 08' 08"
2   Alberto Contador (ESP) Tinkoff–Saxo + 27"
3   Jurgen Van den Broeck (BEL) Lotto–Belisol + 35"
4   Wilco Kelderman (NED)   Belkin Pro Cycling + 43"
5   Romain Bardet (FRA) Ag2r–La Mondiale + 1' 20"
6   Adam Yates (GBR) Orica–GreenEDGE + 2' 05"
7   Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) Astana + 2' 12"
8   Mikel Nieve (ESP) Team Sky + 2' 59"
9   Daniel Navarro (ESP) Cofidis + 3' 04"
10   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 3' 17"

Classification leadershipEdit

In the 2014 Critérium du Dauphiné, four different jerseys will be awarded. For the general classification, calculated by adding each cyclist's finishing times on each stage, the leader received a yellow jersey with a blue bar.[30] This classification was considered the most important of the 2014 Critérium du Dauphiné, and the winner of the classification was considered the winner of the race.

Additionally, there was a points classification, which awarded a green jersey.[30] In the points classification, cyclists got points for finishing in the top 10 in a stage. For all stages, the win earned 15 points, second place earned 12 points, third 10, fourth 8, fifth 6, and one point fewer per place down to a single point for 10th. Points towards the classification could also be achieved at each of the intermediate sprints; these points were given to the top three riders through the line with 5 points for first, 3 for second, and 1 point for third.[30]

There was also a mountains classification, the leadership of which was marked by a red and white polka-dot jersey.[30] In the mountains classification, points were won by reaching the top of a climb before other cyclists. Each climb was categorised as either hors, first, second, third, or fourth-category, with more points available for the higher-categorised climbs. Hors catégorie climbs awarded the most points, with 20 points on offer for the first rider across the summit; the first ten riders were able to accrue points towards the mountains classification, compared with the first eight on first-category passes and the first six riders on second-category climbs.[30] Fewer points were on offer for the smaller hills, marked as third-category or fourth-category.[30]

The fourth jersey represented the young rider classification, marked by a white jersey.[30] This was decided the same way as the general classification, but only riders born after 1 January 1989 were eligible to be ranked in the classification. There was also a classification for teams, in which the times of the best three cyclists per team on each stage were added together; the leading team at the end of the race was the team with the lowest total time.[30]

Stage Winner General classification
 
Mountains classification
 
Points classification
 
Young rider classification
 
Team Classification
 
1 Chris Froome Chris Froome Vincenzo Nibali Chris Froome Bob Jungels Team Sky
2 Chris Froome Kévin Reza Wilco Kelderman Astana
3 Nikias Arndt
4 Yuri Trofimov
5 Simon Špilak Alessandro De Marchi
6 Jan Bakelants
7 Lieuwe Westra Alberto Contador
8 Mikel Nieve Andrew Talansky
Final Andrew Talansky Alessandro De Marchi Chris Froome Wilco Kelderman Astana
Notes
  • In stages 2–5, Alberto Contador, who was second in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because Chris Froome (in first place) wore the yellow jersey as leader of the general classification during those stages. In stage 6, Contador still wore the green jersey despite having dropped to third in the points classification. Wilco Kelderman rose to second in the points classification after stage 5, but wore the white jersey as leader of the young rider classification during stage 6.
  • In stage 7, Jan Bakelants, who was second in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because Chris Froome (in first place) wore the yellow jersey as leader of the general classification during that stage.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "2014 Critérium du Dauphiné". BikeRaceInfo. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  2. ^ Daniel Benson. "Critérium du Dauphiné 2014: Preview". Cyclingnews.com. Retrieved 8 June 2014.
  3. ^ Wynn, Nigel (5 June 2014). "Criterium du Dauphine 2014 start list". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  4. ^ "Start List". Cycling News. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  5. ^ "Critérium du Dauphiné 2014". Cycling News. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  6. ^ Benson, Daniel (6 June 2014). "Critérium du Dauphiné race preview". Cycling News. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  7. ^ "Clasificaciones" [Classifications] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 9 June 2014. p. 33. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  8. ^ Farrand, Stephen (8 June 2014). "Froome dominates the opening Dauphine TT in Lyon". Cycling News. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  9. ^ "Stage 1 Results and Photos". BikeRaceInfo. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  10. ^ a b "Clasificaciones" [Classifications] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 10 June 2014. p. 28. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  11. ^ a b "Froome climbs to victory on Col du Béal". Cycling News. 9 June 2014. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  12. ^ a b "Stage 2 Results and Photos". BikeRaceInfo. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  13. ^ a b "Clasificaciones" [Classifications] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 11 June 2014. p. 34. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  14. ^ a b Ryan, Barry (10 June 2014). "Arndt shades tight Dauphiné sprint finish at Le Teil". Cycling News. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  15. ^ a b "Stage 3 Results and Photos". BikeRaceInfo. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  16. ^ a b "Clasificaciones" [Classifications] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 12 June 2014. p. 41. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  17. ^ a b Farrand, Stephen (11 June 2014). "Critérium du Dauphiné: Trofimov wins alone in Gap". Cycling News. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  18. ^ a b "Stage 4 Results and Photos". BikeRaceInfo. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  19. ^ a b "Clasificaciones" [Classifications] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 13 June 2014. p. 36. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  20. ^ a b Been, José (12 June 2014). "Criterium du Dauphine: Spilak wins alone as Contador attacks Froome". Cycling News. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  21. ^ a b "Stage 5 Results and Photos". BikeRaceInfo. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  22. ^ a b "Clasificaciones" [Classifications] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 14 June 2014. p. 39. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  23. ^ a b Benson, Daniel (13 June 2014). "Critérium du Dauphiné: Bakelants wins stage 6". Cycling News. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  24. ^ a b "Stage 6 Results and Photos". BikeRaceInfo. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  25. ^ a b "Clasificaciones" [Classifications] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 15 June 2014. p. 39. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  26. ^ a b Wesetmeyer, Susan (14 June 2014). "Westra wins on Finaut-Émosson". Cycling News. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  27. ^ a b "Stage 7 Results and Photos". BikeRaceInfo. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  28. ^ a b "Clasificaciones" [Classifications] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 16 June 2014. p. 39. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  29. ^ a b Westemeyer, Susan (15 June 2014). "Talansky wins Critérium du Dauphiné". Cycling News. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h "2014 Critérium du Dauphiné: Specific regulations" (PDF). Critérium du Dauphiné. Amaury Sport Organisation. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-04-02. Retrieved 2 March 2015.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit