1964 Summer Paralympics medal table

The 13th International Stoke Mandeville Games, later known as the 1964 Summer Paralympics, was an international multi-sport event held in Tokyo, Japan, from November 3 to 12, 1964, in which paraplegic and tetraplegic athletes competed against one another.[2][3][4] The Stoke Mandeville Games were a forerunner to the Paralympics first organized by Sir Ludwig Guttmann in 1948.[4] This medal table ranks the competing National Paralympic Committees (NPCs) by the number of gold medals won by their athletes.

A far view of a stadium, with suspension roof design.
Yoyogi National Gymnasium hosted the closing ceremony of the Games.[1]

A total of 418 medals were awarded in 9 sports. Athletes from 17 of the 19 competing NPCs won at least one medal with the United States taking both the most gold medals, with 50, and most in total, with 123.[5] The host nation Japan won 10 medals at the Games: 1 gold, 5 silver and 4 bronze. The debuting NPCs included Japan, South Africa, Sweden and Fiji. South Africa, despite being banned from the Olympics,[6] was present at the 1964 Paralympics.[7]

Athletes with outstanding performances included Margaret Harriman of Rhodesia who won two gold medals in archery,[8] and Serge Bec of France who won two individuals gold medals, one team gold medal and one team silver medal.[9] Dick Thompson of the United Kingdom won two individual golds, one silver and one bronze in athletics.[10] The United States' Ron Stein won six golds and South Africa's Daniel Erasmus won two golds and two silvers in athletics.[10]

Medal tableEdit

The ranking in this table is based on information provided by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) and is consistent with IPC convention in its published medal tables. By default, the table is ordered by the number of gold medals the athletes from a nation have won (in this context, a "nation" is an entity represented by a National Paralympic Committee). The number of silver medals is taken into consideration next and then the number of bronze medals. If nations are still tied, equal ranking is given and they are listed alphabetically by IPC country code.

With a few exceptions, each event contributed one medal of each type to the table (although for team events, multiple physical medals were actually awarded). Two bronze medals were awarded in the dartchery, snooker and table tennis events.[11][12][13] Some swimming events did not award silver or bronze medals.[14]

The US dominated the medal standings. Great Britain finished second, followed by Italy, Australia and Rhodesia.[1]

  • To sort this table by nation, total medal count, or any other column, click on the   icon next to the column title.

  *   Host nation (Japan)

RankNPCGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  United States504132123
2  Great Britain18232061
3  Italy14151645
4  Australia1211730
5  Rhodesia105217
6  South Africa88319
7  Israel731121
8  Argentina6151637
9  West Germany52512
10  Netherlands46414
11  France42511
12  Austria41712
13  Japan*15410
14  Belgium1023
15  Switzerland0101
16  Malta0022
17  Sweden0011
Totals (17 NPCs)144138137419

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • "Medal Standings – Tokyo 1964 Paralympic Games". International Paralympic Committee. Archived from the original (pdf) on 11 September 2012. Retrieved 26 April 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
Specific
  1. ^ a b "Tokyo 1964". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 14 March 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Summer Games Governance 1960 to 1992". International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation. Archived from the original on 17 March 2010. Retrieved 13 May 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "Paralympic Games History – Summer". Australian Paralympic Committee. Archived from the original on 5 June 2011. Retrieved 13 May 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ a b "Paralympic Games". International Paralympic Committee. Archived from the original on 5 June 2011. Retrieved 15 May 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "Medal Standings Tokyo 1964 Paralympic Games". International Paralympic Committee. Archived from the original (pdf) on 11 September 2012. Retrieved 28 April 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ "South Africa Readmitted To Olympics". The Victoria Advocate. February 16, 1968. South Africa, barred from the 1964 Olympics for its racial policies, was readmitted into the 1968 Olympics at Mexico City by a vote of an "absolute majority" of members of the International Olympic Committee.
  7. ^ "The Thirteenth International Stoke Mandeville Games for The Paralysed". Japanese Society for Rehabilitation of Persons with Disabilities. March 17, 1999.
  8. ^ "Medallists-Tokyo 1964 Paralympic Games-Archery". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 17 March 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ "Medallists-Tokyo 1964 Paralympic Games-Wheelchair Fencing". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 17 March 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ a b "Medallists-Tokyo 1964 Paralympic Games-Athletics". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 17 March 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ "Medallists Tokyo 1964 Paralympic Games Dartchery". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 12 May 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ "Medallists Tokyo 1964 Paralympic Games Snooker". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 12 May 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ "Medallists Tokyo 1964 Paralympic Games Table Tennis". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 12 May 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. ^ "Medallists Tokyo 1964 Paralympic Games Swimming". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 12 May 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)