1953 Philippine general election

Presidential, legislative and local elections were held on November 10, 1953 in the Philippines.[1] Incumbent President Elpidio Quirino lost his opportunity to get a second full term as President of the Philippines to former Defense Secretary Ramon Magsaysay. His running mate, Senator Jose Yulo lost to Senator Carlos P. Garcia. Vice President Fernando Lopez did not run for re-election. This was the first time that an elected president did not come from the Senate. This election also saw the involvement of the United States with the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) with agent Edward Lansdale running Magsaysay's campaign.[2] Other candidates competed for CIA support too and many normal Filipinos were interested in what the United States citizens views were on it.[3]

ResultsEdit

PresidentEdit

CandidatePartyVotes%
Ramon MagsaysayNacionalista Party2,912,99268.90
Elpidio QuirinoLiberal Party1,313,99131.08
Gaudencio BuenoIndependent7360.02
Total4,227,719100.00
Valid votes4,227,71997.71
Invalid/blank votes98,9872.29
Total votes4,326,706100.00
Registered voters/turnout5,603,23177.22
Source: Nohlen, Grotz, Hartmann, Hasall and Santos[4]

Vice-PresidentEdit

CandidatePartyVotes%
Carlos P. GarciaNacionalista Party2,515,26562.90
José YuloLiberal Party1,483,80237.10
Total3,999,067100.00
Valid votes3,999,06792.43
Invalid/blank votes327,6397.57
Total votes4,326,706100.00
Registered voters/turnout5,603,23177.22
Source: Nohlen, Grotz, Hartmann, Hasall and Santos[5]

SenateEdit

 
Representation of results; seats contested are inside the box.
  Nacionalista Party
  Liberal Party
  Democratic Party
  Vacancy
e • d Summary of the November 10, 1953 Philippine Senate election result
Rank Candidate Party Votes %
1 Fernando López Democratic 2,272,642 52.5%
2 Lorenzo Tañada NCP 2,156,717 49.8%
3 Eulogio Rodriguez Nacionalista 2,071,844 47.9%
4 Emmanuel Pelaez Nacionalista 2,010,128 46.5%
5 Edmundo B. Cea Nacionalista 1,961,705 45.3%
6 Mariano Jesús Cuenco Nacionalista 1,853,247 42.8%
7 Alejo Mabanag Nacionalista 1,846,190 42.7%
8 Ruperto Kangleon Democratic 1,521,012 35.2%
9 Geronima Pecson Liberal 1,349,163 31.2%
10 Camilo Osías Liberal 1,324,567 30.6%
11 Jose Figueroa Liberal 1,194,952 27.6%
12 Vicente Madrigal Liberal 1,155,577 26.7%
13 José Avelino Liberal 1,012,599 23.4%
14 Jacinto O. Borja Liberal 968,841 22.4%
15 Salipada K. Pendatun Liberal 945,755 21.9%
16 Pablo A. David Liberal 909,790 21.0%
17 Felisberto Verano Nacionalista 59,782 1.4%
18 Jose Maria Veloso Nacionalista 10,270 0.2%
19 Alfredo Abcede Federal Party 5,365 0.1%
20 Concepcion R. Lim de Planas independent politician 4,439 0.1%
Total turnout 4,326,706 77.2%
Total votes 24,634,585 N/A
Registered voters 5,603,231 100.0%
Note: A total of 20 candidates ran for senator. Source:[6]

House of RepresentativesEdit

 
PartyVotes%+/–Seats+/–
Nacionalista Party[a]1,930,36747.30+13.2559+26
Liberal Party1,624,57139.81−24.3231−29
Democratic Party[a]342,8898.40+8.2911New
Independent Nacionalista42,0811.03New00
Independent Liberal25,9270.64New00
People's Party3,1550.08New00
New Young Philippines6200.02New00
Republican4310.01New00
Independent111,1602.72+1.3010
Total4,081,201100.00102+2
Valid votes4,081,20194.33
Invalid/blank votes245,4955.67
Total votes4,326,696100.00
Registered voters/turnout5,603,23177.22+9.83
Source: Nohlen, Grotz and Hartmann[7] and Teehankee[8]
  1. ^ a b Two of the Democratic Party seats are on a joint Nacionalista–Democratic ticket.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gosnell, Harold F. (1954). "An Interpretation of the Philippine Election of 1953". American Political Science Review. 48 (4): 1128–1138. doi:10.2307/1951015. ISSN 0003-0554.
  2. ^ Tharoor, Ishaan (13 October 2016). "The long history of the U.S. interfering with elections elsewhere". The Washington Post. Retrieved 21 May 2019.
  3. ^ Cullather, Nick (1994). Illusions of influence: the political economy of United States-Philippines relations, 1942–1960. Stanford University Press. pp. 108–109. ISBN 978-0-8047-2280-3.
  4. ^ Dieter Nohlen; Florian Grotz; Christof Hartmann; Graham Hassall; Soliman M. Santos.
    Elections in Asia and the Pacific: A Data Handbook: Volume II: South East Asia, East Asia, and the South Pacific
    .
  5. ^ Dieter Nohlen; Florian Grotz; Christof Hartmann; Graham Hassall; Soliman M. Santos.
    Elections in Asia and the Pacific: A Data Handbook: Volume II: South East Asia, East Asia, and the South Pacific
    .
  6. ^ Christof Hartmann; Graham Hassall; Soliman M. Santos, Jr. (2001). Dieter Nohlen, Florian Grotz and Christof Hartmann (ed.). Elections in Asia and the Pacific Vol. II. Oxford University Press. pp. 185–230. ISBN 0199249598.
  7. ^ Nohlen, Dieter; Grotz, Florian; Hartmann, Christof (eds.). Elections in Asia and the Pacific: A Data Handbook. Vol. 2: South East Asia, East Asia, and the South Pacific. Oxford: Oxford University Press..
  8. ^ Teehankee, Julio (2002). "Electoral Politics in the Philippines" (PDF). In Croissant, Aurel (ed.). Electoral Politics in Southeast and East Asia. Singapore: Fiedrich-Ebert-Siftung. pp. 149–202 – via quezon.ph.

External linksEdit