1930–31 NHL season

The 1930–31 NHL season was the 14th season of the National Hockey League. Ten teams played 44 games each. The Montreal Canadiens beat the Chicago Black Hawks three games to two in the best-of-five Stanley Cup Finals for their second consecutive Stanley Cup victory.

1930–31 NHL season
LeagueNational Hockey League
SportIce hockey
DurationNovember 11, 1930 – April 14, 1931
Number of games44
Number of teams10
Regular season
Season championsBoston Bruins
Season MVPHowie Morenz (Canadiens)
Top scorerHowie Morenz (Canadiens)
Canadian Division championsMontreal Canadiens
American Division championsBoston Bruins
Stanley Cup
ChampionsMontreal Canadiens
  Runners-upChicago Black Hawks
NHL seasons

League businessEdit

Art Ross bitterly complained about the Stanley Cup final setup. His team had been vanquished in two consecutive games by the Montreal Canadiens in 1929–30. As a result, the Board of Governors decided to make the final a best-of-five series.[citation needed]

The Great Depression was starting to take its toll on the NHL. In attempts to solve financial problems, the Pittsburgh Pirates moved to Philadelphia and became the Philadelphia Quakers, but there was nothing about the team to win games or fans. It was intended that the team stay in Philadelphia only until a new arena was built in Pittsburgh. The arena was never built, and the team folded after only one season in the new city. The state of Pennsylvania would be without an NHL team until the league doubled in size 36 years later.[citation needed]

The Ottawa Senators were in a similar financial boat but instead of relocating, they sold a star asset and future Hall of Famer, King Clancy, to the Toronto Maple Leafs for $35,000 and two players. Even after the sale of Clancy, the Senators' owners put the team up for sale for $200,000, although no bids approached anywhere near that figure. The team would suspend operations before the start of the next season.[1]

The Detroit Cougars changed the team name to the Detroit Falcons.[citation needed]

The Canadian Amateur Hockey Association (CAHA) sent W. A. Fry and W. A. Hewitt to the 1930 NHL general meeting to seek a better working agreement. The CAHA suggested that players remain as amateurs for one season after graduating from junior ice hockey, and in return the CAHA would permit its amateurs to tryout and practice with professional teams.[2] Hewitt subsequently met multiple times with NHL president Frank Calder, who saw merit in Hewitt's request to keep players in amateur hockey, and continued to discuss having a professional-amateur agreement.[3]

Regular seasonEdit

Howie Morenz led the league in scoring.

Dick Irvin started his career in coaching with Chicago and they finished second in the American Division. He resigned at season's end after having taken the Black Hawks to the finals.

Final standingsEdit

American Division
Team GP W L T GF GA PTS
Boston Bruins 44 28 10 6 143 90 62
Chicago Black Hawks 44 24 17 3 108 78 51
New York Rangers 44 19 16 9 106 87 47
Detroit Falcons 44 16 21 7 102 105 39
Philadelphia Quakers 44 4 36 4 76 184 12
Canadian Division
GP W L T GF GA Pts
Montreal Canadiens 44 26 10 8 129 89 60
Toronto Maple Leafs 44 22 13 9 118 99 53
Montreal Maroons 44 20 18 6 105 106 46
New York Americans 44 18 16 10 76 74 46
Ottawa Senators 44 10 30 4 91 142 24

GP = Games Played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, Pts = Points, GF = Goals For, GA = Goals Against
Teams that qualified for the playoffs are highlighted in bold.

PlayoffsEdit

On March 26, during the second game of the best-of-five series between the Bruins and Canadiens, coach-GM Art Ross of Boston pulled his goalie for an extra attacker while down 1–0 with 40 seconds left in the final period. The attempt was unsuccessful. This marked the first time in Stanley Cup play that a goalie was pulled for an extra attacker.[4]

Playoff bracketEdit

Quarterfinals Semifinals Stanley Cup Finals
         
C1 Mtl Canadiens 3
A1 Boston 2
C1 Mtl Canadiens 3
A2 Chicago 2
C2 Toronto 3G
A2 Chicago 4G
A2 Chicago 3G
A3 NY Rangers 0G
C3 Mtl Maroons 1G
A3 NY Rangers 8G


QuarterfinalsEdit

(C2) Toronto Maple Leafs vs. (A2) Chicago Black HawksEdit

March 24 Chicago Black Hawks 2–2 Toronto Maple Leafs Arena Gardens Recap  
Mush March (1) – 16:59 First period 11:53 – Ace Bailey (1)
Mush March (2) – 11:22 Second period 12:11 – Andy Blair (1)
No scoring Third period No scoring
Charlie Gardiner Goalie stats Lorne Chabot
March 26 Toronto Maple Leafs 1–2 OT Chicago Black Hawks Chicago Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period 17:15 – Vic Ripley (1)
No scoring Second period No scoring
King Clancy (1) – 17:00 Third period No scoring
No scoring First overtime period 19:20 – Stew Adams (1)
Lorne Chabot Goalie stats Charlie Gardiner
Chicago won series on total goals 4–3


(A3) New York Rangers vs. (C3) Montreal MaroonsEdit

March 24 Montreal Maroons 1–5 New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
No scoring First period 10:34 – Bill Cook (1)
No scoring Second period 16:51 – Bill Cook (2)
Nels Stewart (1) – 19:26 Third period 05:15 – Paul Thompson (1)
13:11 – Butch Keeling (1)
14:23 – Paul Thompson
Dave Kerr Goalie stats John Ross Roach
March 26 New York Rangers 3–0 Montreal Maroons Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Bill Cook (3) – 07:15
Ching Johnson (1) – 10:20
Paul Thompson (3)
Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
John Ross Roach Goalie stats Dave Kerr
New York won series on total goals 8–1


SemifinalsEdit

(A1) Boston Bruins vs. (C1) Montreal CanadiensEdit

March 24 Montreal Canadiens 4–5 OT Boston Bruins Boston Madison Square Garden Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Johnny Gagnon (1) – 05:23
Nick Wasnie (1) – 06:26
Marty Burke (1) – 19:08
Second period 17:34 – Dit Clapper (1)
Sylvio Mantha (1) – 02:45 Third period 03:49 – Eddie Shore (1)
06:29 – Cooney Weiland (1)
10:26 – George Owen (1)
No scoring First overtime period 18:56 – Cooney Weiland (2)
George Hainsworth Goalie stats Tiny Thompson
March 26 Montreal Canadiens 1–0 Boston Bruins Boston Madison Square Garden Recap  
Georges Mantha (1) – 13:30 First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
George Hainsworth Goalie stats Tiny Thompson
March 28 Boston Bruins 3–4 OT Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Dit Clapper (2) – 17:20 First period 02:30 – Sylvio Mantha (2)
No scoring Second period 02:25 – Gus Rivers (1)
15:12 – Georges Mantha (2)
Cooney Weiland (3) – 00:55
Marty Barry (1) – 14:15
Third period No scoring
No scoring First overtime period 05:10 – Georges Mantha (3)
Tiny Thompson Goalie stats George Hainsworth
March 30 Boston Bruins 3–1 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Cooney Weiland (4) – 16:02 First period No scoring
Eddie Shore (2) – 08:32
George Owen (2) – 14:46
Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 09:39 – Nick Wasnie (2)
Tiny Thompson Goalie stats George Hainsworth
April 1 Boston Bruins 2–3 OT Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period 06:28 – Johnny Gagnon (2)
09:18 – Pit Lepine (1)
No scoring Second period No scoring
Cooney Weiland (5) – 04:34
Cooney Weiland (6) – 13:42
Third period No scoring
No scoring First overtime period 19:00 – Wildor Larochelle (1)
Tiny Thompson Goalie stats George Hainsworth
Montreal won series 3–2


(A2) Chicago Black Hawks vs. (A3) New York RangersEdit

March 29 New York Rangers 0–2 Chicago Black Hawks Chicago Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period 12:25 – Johnny Gottselig (1)
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 04:36 – Doc Romnes (1)
John Ross Roach Goalie stats Charlie Gardiner
March 31 Chicago Black Hawks 1–0 New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
Tom Cook (1) – 05:30 Third period No scoring
Charlie Gardiner Goalie stats John Ross Roach
Chicago won series on total goals 3–0


Stanley Cup FinalsEdit

In the final series, the Chicago Black Hawks took an early two games to one lead in the newly expanded best-of-five Stanley Cup finals but the Montreal Canadiens came back and won the series three games to two for their second consecutive Stanley Cup win.


April 3 Montreal Canadiens 2–1 Chicago Black Hawks Chicago Stadium Recap  
Georges Mantha (3) – 04:50 First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
Pit Lepine (2) – 02:20 Third period 08:20 – Vic Ripley (2)
George Hainsworth Goalie stats Charlie Gardiner
April 5 Montreal Canadiens 1–2 2OT Chicago Black Hawks Chicago Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period 11:45 – Stew Adams (2)
Nick Wasnie (3) – 12:10 Third period No scoring
No scoring Second overtime period 04:50 – Johnny Gottselig (2)
George Hainsworth Goalie stats Charlie Gardiner
April 9 Chicago Black Hawks 3–2 3OT Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period 05:15 – Johnny Gagnon (3)
No scoring Second period 07:29 – Georges Mantha (5)
Mush March (3) – 16:20
Stew Adams (3) – 17:07
Third period No scoring
Cy Wentworth (1) – 13:50 Third overtime period No scoring
Charlie Gardiner Goalie stats George Hainsworth
April 11 Chicago Black Hawks 2–4 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Johnny Gottselig (3) – 01:33
Ty Arbour (1) – 13:58
First period No scoring
No scoring Second period 04:34 – Johnny Gagnon (4)
No scoring Third period 04:25 – Johnny Gagnon (5)
10:55 – Pit Lepine (3)
17:25 – Pit Lepine (4)
Charlie Gardiner Goalie stats George Hainsworth
April 14 Montreal Canadiens 2–0 Chicago Black Hawks Chicago Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
09:59 – Johnny Gagnon (6) Second period No scoring
15:27 – Howie Morenz (1) Third period No scoring
George Hainsworth Goalie stats Charlie Gardiner
Montreal won series 3–2


AwardsEdit

Howie Morenz won the Hart Trophy for the second time in his career. Frank Boucher won the Lady Byng for the fourth consecutive year. Roy Worts won the Vezina Trophy for the one and only time in his career.

1930–31 NHL awards
O'Brien Cup:
(Canadian Division champion)
Montreal Canadiens
Prince of Wales Trophy:
(American Division champion)
Boston Bruins
Hart Trophy:
(Most valuable player)
Howie Morenz, Montreal Canadiens
Lady Byng Trophy:
(Excellence and sportsmanship)
Frank Boucher, New York Rangers
Vezina Trophy:
(Fewest goals allowed)
Roy Worters, New York Americans

All-Star teamsEdit

This was the first season that the NHL named its 'all-stars'. Although Roy Worters won the Vezina Trophy for "most valuable goaltender", Charlie Gardiner and Tiny Thompson were named to the all-star teams at the goaltender position.

First Team   Position   Second Team
Charlie Gardiner, Chicago Black Hawks G Tiny Thompson, Boston Bruins
Eddie Shore, Boston Bruins D Sylvio Mantha, Montreal Canadiens
King Clancy, Toronto Maple Leafs D Ching Johnson, New York Rangers
Howie Morenz, Montreal Canadiens C Frank Boucher, New York Rangers
Bill Cook, New York Rangers RW Dit Clapper, Boston Bruins
Aurel Joliat, Montreal Canadiens LW Bun Cook, New York Rangers
Lester Patrick, New York Rangers Coach Dick Irvin, Chicago Black Hawks

Source: NHL.[5]

Player statisticsEdit

Scoring leadersEdit

GP = Games Played, G = Goals, A = Assists, Pts = Points, PIM = Penalties In Minutes

Player Team GP G A Pts PIM
Howie Morenz Montreal Canadiens 39 28 23 51 49
Ebbie Goodfellow Detroit Falcons 44 25 23 48 32
Charlie Conacher Toronto Maple Leafs 37 31 12 43 78
Bill Cook New York Rangers 43 30 12 42 39
Ace Bailey Toronto Maple Leafs 40 23 19 42 46
Joe Primeau Toronto Maple Leafs 38 9 32 41 18
Nels Stewart Montreal Maroons 42 25 14 39 75
Frank Boucher New York Rangers 44 12 27 39 20
Cooney Weiland Boston Bruins 44 25 13 38 14
Bun Cook New York Rangers 44 18 17 35 72
Aurel Joliat Montreal Canadiens 43 13 22 35 73

Source: NHL.[6]

Leading goaltendersEdit

Note: GP = Games played; Mins = Minutes played; GA = Goals against; SO = Shutouts; GAA = Goals against average

Player Team GP W L T Mins GA SO GAA
Roy Worters New York Americans 44 18 16 10 2760 74 8 1.61
Charlie Gardiner Chicago Black Hawks 44 24 17 3 2710 78 12 1.73
John Ross Roach New York Rangers 44 19 16 9 2760 87 7 1.89
George Hainsworth Montreal Canadiens 44 26 10 8 2740 89 8 1.95
Tiny Thompson Boston Bruins 44 28 10 6 2730 90 3 1.98
Lorne Chabot Toronto Maple Leafs 37 21 8 8 2300 80 6 2.09

Source: NHL.[7]

CoachesEdit

American DivisionEdit

Canadian DivisionEdit

DebutsEdit

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NHL game in 1930–31 (listed with their first team, asterisk(*) marks debut in playoffs):

Last gamesEdit

The following is a list of players of note that played their last game in the NHL in 1930–31 (listed with their last team):

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (2000). Total Hockey. Total Sports. ISBN 1-892129-85-X.
  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (2009). NHL Official Guide & Rule Book 2010. NHL.
  • Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2011). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book 2012. Dan Diamond & Associates. ISBN 978-1-894801-22-5.
  • Dryden, Steve, ed. (2000). Century of hockey. Toronto, ON: McClelland & Stewart Ltd. ISBN 0-7710-4179-9.
  • Fischler, Stan; Fischler, Shirley; Hughes, Morgan; Romain, Joseph; Duplacey, James (2003). The Hockey Chronicle: Year-by-Year History of the National Hockey League. Publications International Inc. ISBN 0-7853-9624-1.
  • McFarlane, Brian (1973). The Story of the National Hockey League. New York, NY: Pagurian Press. ISBN 0-684-13424-1.
  • Kitchen, Paul (2008). Win, Tie or Wrangle. Manotick, Ontario: Penumbra Press. ISBN 978-1-897323-46-5.
  • McFarlane, Brian (1989). One hundred years of hockey. Toronto, Ontario: Deneau Publishers. ISBN 0-88879-216-6.
Notes
  1. ^ Kitchen(2008), pp. 306–309
  2. ^ "C.A.H.A. Officials Seek Better Working Agreement". Winnipeg Free Press. Winnipeg, Manitoba. The Canadian Press. May 12, 1930. p. 8. 
  3. ^ "Professional Rules Might Be Adopted". The Kingston Whig-Standard. Kingston, Ontario. May 15, 1930. p. 8. 
  4. ^ McFarlane, p. 28
  5. ^ Diamond 2009, p. 234.
  6. ^ Dinger 2011, p. 146.
  7. ^ "1930–1931 – Regular Season – Goalie – Goalie Season Stats Leaders – Goals Against Average". nhl.com. Retrieved March 24, 2015.

External linksEdit