Canadian Amateur Hockey Association

The Canadian Amateur Hockey Association (CAHA) was the national governing body of amateur ice hockey in Canada from 1914 until 1994, when it merged with Hockey Canada. Its jurisdiction also included competition for the Allan Cup, the Memorial Cup, and choosing the representative of the Canada men's national ice hockey team.

Canadian Amateur Hockey Association
Canadian Amateur Hockey Association logo
AbbreviationCAHA
Merged intoHockey Canada
FormationDecember 4, 1914 (1914-12-04)
Founded atOttawa, Ontario, Canada
Extinction1994 (1994)

HistoryEdit

The association was formed in 1914 at a meeting at the Chateau Laurier hotel in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada of the Allan Cup trustees. The trustees of the Cup were not able to keep up with the organization of the annual Allan Cup tournament and the issues of inter-league play. It was formed with the goal of facilitating the Allan Cup.[1] The CAHA became Memorial Cup trustees in 1919,[2] and assumed the role of selecting teams to represent the Canada men's national ice hockey team in 1920.[3]

CAHA president Murray Costello and Hockey Canada president Bill Hay, negotiated a merger between the two organizations in 1994, under the Canadian Hockey Association name, which has operated as Hockey Canada since 1998.[4] Combining the two groups allowed for the profits from Hockey Canada events such as the Canada Cup and the Summit Series, to be used at the grassroots level, and it also allowed professionals into international competitions such as the Ice Hockey World Championships, and eventually the Olympics.[5]

List of presidentsEdit

List of Canadian Amateur Hockey Association presidents from 1914 to 1994.[6][7]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ McKinley, Michael (2014), pp. 5–7
  2. ^ McKinley, Michael (2014), pp. 16–18
  3. ^ McKinley, Michael (2014), pp. 21–23
  4. ^ "Hay, Bill — Biography — Honoured Member". Legends of Hockey. HHOF. Retrieved June 5, 2020.
  5. ^ Edmonds, Paul (June 19, 2017). "The man with the plan". Hockey Canada. Retrieved June 5, 2020.
  6. ^ "Past Officers". Hockey Canada. Retrieved April 16, 2018.
  7. ^ Constitution, By-laws, Regulations, History. Gloucester, Ontario: Canadian Amateur Hockey Association. May 1990. pp. 125–134.

BibliographyEdit

  • McKinley, Michael (2014). It's Our Game: Celebrating 100 Years Of Hockey Canada. Toronto, Ontario: Viking. ISBN 978-0-670-06817-3.