18th Chess Olympiad

The 18th Chess Olympiad, organized by FIDE and comprising an open[1] team tournament, as well as several other events designed to promote the game of chess, took place between October 17 and November 7, 1968, in Lugano, Switzerland.

The official poster for the Olympiad.

The Soviet team with six GMs, led by world champion Petrosian, lived up to expectations and won their ninth consecutive gold medals, with Yugoslavia and Bulgaria taking the silver and bronze, respectively.

ResultsEdit

PreliminariesEdit

A total of 53 teams entered the competition and were divided into seven preliminary groups of seven or eight teams each. The top two from each group advanced to Final A, the teams placed third-fourth to Final B, no. 5-6 to Final C, and the rest to Final D. Preliminary head-to-head results were carried over to the finals, so no teams met more than once. All preliminary groups and finals were played as round-robin tournaments. The results were as follows:

  • Group 1: 1. Soviet Union, 2. Philippines, 3. England, 4. Israel, 5. Italy, 6. Portugal, 7. Mexico, 8. Cyprus.
  • Group 2: 1. Denmark, 2. United States, 3. Mongolia, 4. Austria, 5. Australia, 6. Venezuela, 7. France.
  • Group 3: 1. Yugoslavia, 2. Poland, 3. Spain, 4. Scotland, 5. South Africa, 6. Luxembourg, 7. Dominican Republic.
  • Group 4: 1. Hungary, 2. Canada, 3. Netherlands, 4. Belgium, 5. Monaco, 6. Ireland, 7. Paraguay, 8. Costa Rica.
  • Group 5: 1. West Germany, 2. Romania, 3. Switzerland, 4. Brazil, 5. Norway, 6. Puerto Rico, 7. Hong Kong, 8. Lebanon.
  • Group 6: 1. Argentina, 2. East Germany, 3. Finland, 4. Sweden, 5. Greece, 6. Morocco, 7. British Virgin Islands.
  • Group 7: 1. Bulgaria, 2. Czechoslovakia, 3. Iceland, 4. Cuba, 5. Tunisia, 6. Turkey, 7. Singapore, 8. Andorra.

FinalEdit

Final A
# Country Players Points MP
1   Soviet Union Petrosian, Spassky, Korchnoi, Geller, Polugaevsky, Smyslov 39½
2   Yugoslavia Gligorić, Ivkov, Matanović, Matulović, Parma, Čirić 31
3   Bulgaria Bobotsov, Tringov, Padevsky, Kolarov, Radulov, Peev 30
4   United States Reshevsky, Evans, Benko, R. Byrne, Lombardy, D. Byrne 29½
5   West Germany Unzicker, Schmid, Darga, Pfleger, Hübner, Hecht 29
6   Hungary Portisch, Szabó, Bilek, Lengyel, Barcza, Csom 27½
7   Argentina Najdorf, Panno, Sanguineti, Rossetto, Rubinetti, García 26 15
8   Romania Gheorghiu, Ciocâltea, Ghițescu, Drimer, Soós, Ungureanu 26 14
9   Czechoslovakia Hort, Filip, Smejkal, Jansa, Augustin, Janata 24½ 12
10   East Germany Uhlmann, Pietzsch, Zinn, Malich, Liebert, Hennings 24½ 11
11   Poland Kostro, Bednarski, Doda, Schmidt, Adamski, Grąbczewski 23
12   Denmark Larsen, Brinck-Claussen, Hamann, Holm, Petersen, Nørby 21
13   Canada Yanofsky, Suttles, Macskasy, Allan, Day, Schulman 19
14   Philippines Reyes, Balinas, De Castro, Naranja, Bandal, Rodríguez 13½

Individual medalsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Although commonly referred to as the men's division, this section is open to both male and female players.