1880 Prohibition National Convention

The 1880 Prohibition National Convention was a presidential nominating convention held at Halle's Hall, in Cleveland, Ohio on June 17, 1880, to select the Prohibition Party's presidential ticket for the 1880 presidential election.

1880 Prohibition National Convention
1880 presidential election
Neal Dow daguerreotype.jpg Henry A. Thompson.jpg
Nominees
Dow and Thompson
Convention
Date(s)June 17, 1880
CityCleveland, Ohio
VenueHalle's Hall
Candidates
Presidential nomineeNeal Dow of Maine
Vice presidential nomineeHenry Adams Thompson of Ohio
‹ 1876  ·  1884 ›

Presidential nominationEdit

On June 17, 1880, the national convention was called to open and was attended by 142 delegates. Reverend Alonzo Ames Miner was selected to serve as the president of the convention. Neal Dow, the former mayor of Portland, Maine, and Henry Adams Thompson were nominated for the presidential and vice presidential nominations by James Black, hoping that other national figures would seek the party's nomination, and were approved by acclamation.[1][2]

Presidential Ballot Unanimous Vice Presidential Ballot Unanimous
Neal Dow 142 Henry Adams Thompson 142

PlatformEdit

Although the platforms of the 1872 and 1876 included support and opposition to multiple issues, the platform drafted and accepted at the 1880 national convention only included support for issues relating to the prohibition of alcohol and women's suffrage due to the narrow guager faction, which supported a single issue prohibitionist platform, writing it.[3][4]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The National Prohibition Convention". The Greeley Tribune. June 25, 1880. p. 1. Archived from the original on March 28, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ Andersen, Lisa M. F. (September 9, 2013). The Politics of Prohibition. Cambridge University Press. p. 59. ISBN 9781107029378 – via Google Books.
  3. ^ "Page 9 Partisan prophets; a history of the Prohibition Party, 1854-1972".
  4. ^ "Prohibition". The Western Call. July 2, 1880. p. 2. Archived from the original on March 28, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.